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§ FIFTEENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. §\ \ 

.1 ^^^ l.^j 






GARMENT'S 
DIRECTORY 

hx §alkit| anb district, 



AND 



YEAR BOOK 



FOR 



•^ 1S9Q. *^ 



S'R.ICE-THIK.ElEI'lLllTCE. 





,^9^^^^^^^:, DALKEITH. 



Founded 1805, The Oldest Scottish Insurance Office. 

GALEDONIAK 

INSURANCE COMPANY. 



INCOME, £628,674. FUNDS, £2,042,554, 

CLAIMS PAID EXCEED £5,500,000. 



LIFE ASSUEANCES AEE GRANTED WITH AND 
WITHOUT MEDICAL EXAMINATION ON VERY 
LIBERAL TERMS. 



Bonuses may le applied to make a whole-cf-life policy pay 

able diiriiig lifetime. 
Intermediate Bonuses are allowed. 
Perfect Non-forfeitable System. 
Policies in most cases unrestricted as regards Occupation and 

Foreign Residence or Travel. 
Claims payable 10 days after proof of death and title. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Security of the Highest Order. Moderate Premiums. 
Losses Promptly Settled. Surveys made J^ree of Charge. 



Head Office : 19 aEORGB STREET, EDINBURGH. 



Agents- IN Dalkeith — 
GEORGE JACK, S.S.C, Fairfield Place. 
JOHN GARMENT, 67 High Street. 
COLIN COCHRANE, Painter, 16 South Street. 
GEORGE PORTEOUS, 70 High Street 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



The Largest and Finest Sele ction of Music 
and Musical Instruments in the Kingdom. 

IMPORTANT. 
CHEAP AND GOOD PIANOS. 

THOROUGHLY GUARANTEED. 

An impression having got abroad that 
Paterson & Sons only deal in the Higher 
Class Pianos, they respectfully inform the 
Public that they keep always in Stock the 
Largest Selection in Town of the Cheaper 
Class of Good Sound Cottage Pianos, both 
New and Second H.and^ and their extensive 
deahngs with t^^e! • Che^^er Makers of the 
Best Class, eiiS^lgj;hg,isi|v^b, meet the Require- 
ments of all Mt^nding Bu^Vrs. 

These instruments may be purchased by 
Monthly Payments on the Hire System. 

Sole Agents for the PIANOFORTES of Bechstein, 
Steinway, Doerner, B. Squire & Son, Brooklyn Piano 
Co., and the Famous Estey Organs, 

All these Makers' Instruments can be compared 
side by side with those of Broadwood, Collard, 
Kirkman, Erard, Brinsmead, and Challen. 



PATERSON Sc SONS, 

Musicsellers to the Queen, 

27 George Street, Edinburgh; 

And at Glasgow, Perth, Dundee, Ayr, Dumfries, Paisley, Kilmarnock, London, 
and New York. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



EDINBURGH and :©ALKEITH 
©TARRIER, 
Address— 18 HIGH STREET, f^ 

nTTATj-rcDC / 7 Blackfriars Street, Edinburgh. /( 

QUARTERS- |„ South Street, Dalkeith. ' 1 

CRANSTON & ALLAN 

PRACTICAL BOOTMAKERS, 

60 High Street, DALKEITH 

(Successors to RICHARD ALLAN) 

Have always on hand a LARGE ASSORTiMENT of 

Ladios' and Gent/s BOOTS & SHOES from the 

Best Makers. 

Boots and Shoes made to Measure from best material — ^ 

Fit and Workmanship Guaranteed. 

A Speciality in Shepherds' Boots. 

Repairs Neatly and Promptly Executed. 

DRESSMAKER, 
ISLAY COTTAGE, ESKBANK. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Seedsmen, Fruiterers & Florists, 
BUGGLEUGH PLAGE, DALKEITH. 



(Opposite Railway Station.) 



Cut Flowers, Hand and Table Bouquets, Table Plants 
Wreaths and Crosses made to order. 

Experienced Gardeners sent out. 

Nurseries adjoining West Parish Church. 



David Grieve, 

C3- IR O O E I^, 

Tea and Provision Merchant, 

BU€€LEUGE PLACE, 

(Nearly Opposite Railway Station) 

DALKEITH. 



ADVFT^TISEMENTS 



JAMES ^^UNRO, 

DALKEITH STATION. 

Orders promptly delivered from the Local Coliieries. 
House Address — 

Amos' Court, Eskdaill Street. 



ESTABLISHED 1839. 

OFFICE, - - 55 BACK STREET. 
E. HANDYSIDE, Actuary. 



Open onTHUESDAY, - from 11 till 3 cclock 

SATUEDAY, - „ 1 ., 4 „ 

An on SATURDAY EVENING, „ (i , 8 

Total Deposits, £70,000. 

This Bank receives Sums of Is and upwards. The Int<*est 
allowed is at the rate of £2 10s per cent. Pass Books Free. 



! 



SEND 



for KEMP'S SAMPLE BOOKS of (i) Ball Pro- 
r;rammes, (2) Menu Cards, (3) Wedding Cards 
and (4) Fancy Cards. 100 High St., Ijalkeith. 



TJiCse can be completed icith the Printioig required, in Gold and Silver 
in an howr» 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



GEORGE MCDOUGAL, 

iClothier an5 Outfitter, 
31 HIGH STREET, 



Invites attention to his large and carefully selected 
Stock of Scotch and West of England Cloths in the latest Styles, 
Makes and Colourings, all of the best quality. 



Evening- Dress. 
Dress Suits, Fashionable Material', Satin Lined, an J with 
Rich Silk Facings, Superior Finish and Workmanship 
Novelties in Dress Shirts, Collars, Ties, Gloves, for Evening Wear. 



French Regatta, Oxford and Wool Shirts of all kinds in 
Stock, and made to order. 

Underclothing of the best Scotch Manufacture in weights 
to suit all Seasons. 



Christy's London Hats. 



Choice collection of Umbrellas, Paragon Frames, and 
covered with Silk, Guaranteed to Wear. 



Dent's Gloves. 



Ties, Scarfs and Neckwear ; the latest London Novelties. 



Waterproofs. 

The Newest Shapes and most approved Materials 
in Stock and made to measure. 

Warranted thoroughly Waterproof, 



ADVERTISEMENTS 




Butcher and Poulterer, 
Baeon & Ham Curer, Licensed Grame Dealer 



AND 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL SAUSAGE MAKER. 



Cambridge Sausages Fresh Daily. 

Always on hand a large supply of 
CORNED BEEF AND SALT TONGUES. 

^9 HZIO-H: ST. 

(Late Edinburgh Road) 



! 



jyiEtiEi^^miJ^T^i::^^^^. 



MISS V T E R V E T 

25ESK PLACE, DALKEITH, 

Returns thanks for the liberal patronage she has received 
since commencing business, and hopes by strict attention to 
Orders and Moderate Charges, to continue to merit a share 
of public support. 

Miss Tervet goes out by the Day as required. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



GEORGE SINCLAIR, 

Manufaeturipg Cabinetmaker & Upholsterer 

AUCTIONEER & APPRAISER, 

122 High Street, Dalkeith. 



HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE of every description either in Stock or 
made to orde •. Having erected Wood Working Machinery in our Work- 
shops, we are enabled to supply all varieties of Furniture on the best 
possible tenns. 

UPHOLSTERY WORK of all kin^ls tastefuUy carried out. Dining and 
Drawing llooni Suites recovered in Morocco, Tapestry, Velvets, Moquettea 
and other material at moderate prices. Estimates furnished. 

BEDS AND BEDDING.— Iron and Brass Beds in all the newest patterns, 
from ]7/6 U;>vvaids. Bedding of every description. Hair Mattresses cleaned 
and re-made in be.st Linen Cases, 16/6, Wool Mattresses cleaned and re- 
made in New Cases, from 9/6. These are cleaned by special Machinery. 

CARPETS a speciality. Tapestry Squares, from 18/-; Brussel Squares, £2 
a-d upwards— a splendid assortment always on hand. Stiir Carpets from 
6d yer yd. Ij nge assortment of Rugs and Door Mats at lowest prices. 
See our special line of Linoeum at 1/3 per sq. yd. ; also our new inlaid 
Linoleum at 4/-; good patterns. This quality never wears off. 

WINDOW BLINDS of all kinds fitted up on the shortest notice. Venetian 
Blinds re-painted and repaired. An assortment of Blind Hollands always 
in stock. 

CARPET BEATING by MACHINERY.— A perfect Job made of any 
size of Carpet. Carpets sent for and returned on receipt of post card, and 
men to lift and re-lay them if required. 

REMOVALS.— Household Furniture of every description carefully packed 
by experienced men and removed to any distance byroad or rail. Estimates 
given when requested. Furniture ttored by the Week, Month, or Year, at 
moderate rates. 

HOUSE JOBBING, ALTERATIONS, &c.— Houses Decwated for 
Parties, Dances, etc. Halls decorated for Concerts, Entertainments, Balls, 
Bazaars, etc. Ball Cloths supplied. Try our Dancing Floor Polish, simply 
to sprinkle on Floor from Tins. It is pertect. 

Workshops and Saleroom— HUNT'S CLOSE. 

(Opposite Corn Exchange.) 



House ;— The Loau, foot of Back Street. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



GEORGE A. BAIRD, 

CLOTHIER, HATTER, and OUTFITTER, 

FOR 

GENTLEMEN'S, YOUTHS', and BOYS' 
STYLISH CLOTHING. 



66 and 68 HIGH STREET, BALKEITH 

PFT^ER BUNGLE, 

ROPEj TWINE, Aii. SHEEP I^^^-T MANUFACTURER, m 

AND DEALER IN ^ 

Corn & Potato Bags, Cocoa Matting, Door M&ts, &c. I 



ELMFIELD PLACE DALKEITH 

WALTER DEAS, 

Wholesale and Retail Fish and Egg March , 
50 EIGE STREET, DALKEITH. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JOHN COPLAND, 

Wholesale and Retail Tin-Plate Worker, 

l@fSIMI Stlllf , 

:©ALKE1TH. 

House — Tliorburn's Buildings. 



i 

Ii3 msm mm^ mmm -.^g 

House Painter and Decorator, 
16 SOUTH STREET, 

DALKEITH. 

Branch Establishment at Gorebridge. 

Oils Colour?, and Brushes: 
Glass Cut to Order. Papei hangings in Great Variety 

Agent for the Plate Glass Insm^ance Office. 

Established 1850. 
House — 16 Abbey Road. 

BREAD. 
CAKES. BISCUITS. 

Fancy Tea Cakes in Great Variety. 



108 High Street, Dalkeith, 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



GEORGE DOUGLAS & SON, 

IRON AND SEED MERCHANTS, 

DEALERS IN AGRICULTURAL MANURES, OIL CAKES AND OTHER FEEDING STUFFS- 

21 South Street, Dalkeith. 



Tars, Oils, Paints and Sheeping Dips, etc. 
Agents for the Insurance Company of Scotland. 
Leith Office — S Bernard Street. 

THOMAS BBVBRIDGB, 

Plumber, Gasiitter, and Zinc Worker, 

WHITE iiiT STEIET, MiiEITIi 

(House— 72 High Street.) 

All kinds of Plumber and Gas- Fitting Work executed on the best and 
most economical principles. 

House Drains, Soil Pipes and Waste Pipes Tested by Smoke 
Machine, and all Repairs and Alterations Punctually and 
Carefully x\ttended to — Hot and Cold Water Pipes of every 
Def^cription — Baths, Wash-Hand Basins, Closets, Hot and 
Cold Tanks of every descriptioti fitted up on newest principles. 

All kinds of Gas- Fittings, Gas Fires, Gas Stoves and Ranges 
fitted up to be free from smell. 



Sole Agent for the 

WELSBACH INCANDESCEiNT GAS BURNERS, 

For Bonnyrigg, Gorebridge, and Dalkeith. 

All Orders receive prompt attention and personal supervision. 
Estimates Furnished. 




■ JAMES FORSYTH, 

^-^^ BUTCHER, /.^^ 

Blmfield Place, Dalkeith 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



JioFses, Cattle and Carriages 

INSURED BY 

%\jt prrrse, Carriage, mh §mtxd 
^mrnma Cog. S'tb. 

This Office is honoured with the patronage of Her Majesty 
the Queen. 

Chief Office: 17 QUEEN VICTORIA ST., LONDON, E.C. 

T/ie Oldest Office of its kind i7i the United Kingdom. 



DIRECTORS— 
Lieut-Col. G. A. Elliot, J.P.. DullaUir, Camberley, Surrey. 
Arthur Kimber, Esq., 3 Eoland Gardens, S.W. 
The Hon Randolph H. Stewart, Eccleston Square, S.W 
A. Waters, Esq., Coopersale Lodge, Epping. 
BANKERS— 
The London Joint Stock Bank, Ltd., Lothbury, London. 
The Commercial Bank of Scotland, Edinburgh. 

Managing Director — A. Waters. Secretary — R. Riddell Wilson. 

Stallions for the Year or Season. 
In-Foal Mares and Foals. 

Colts against Castration Risks, 

And all Classes of Farm Live Stock. 
Hunters for the Year or Season. 

Claims Paid exceed ;£200,ooo. 



DISTRICT MANAGER— 

J. PEARSON GALLUIV!, C.A. 25 Dublin St, Edinburgh 

Telegrams— <*Callum, Edinburgh." 

TELEPHONE No. loro. 



ADVJERTtSEMEKTS 



VIEWS OF DALKEITH 

& NEIGHBOURHOOD. 



J. GARMENT, 
BookBcUer, Stationer, mxh liibiariaii, 

67 High Street. Dalkeith, 

Would respectfully Invite attention to this 
Department of his business. By his special 
request a large number of New Views have 
been taken recently by 
Messrs Valentine & Sons, Ltd., Dundee, 



J.C. has also a large number of Views by 
Messrs W. Wilson & Co. Ltd., Aberdeen, 
both Scraps and Mounted. 



ALBUMS OF VIEWS. 

Garment's Album of Dalkeith and District 

Twelve Views, 6d. 
Garment's New Album of Dalkeith and 

Neighbourhood, Sixteen Fine Collotype 

Views, is. 



GUIDE BOOKS for the District. 

Large Variety of MxAPS of the District 

for Cyclists and Tourists. 



\ 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



HARROW HOTEL 
DALKEITH. 

This old-e4ablishp(i and favourite Hotel adjoins the 
Dalkeith Railv^ ay Station, and is a m<ist convenient and com- 
fortable house for Toiiiists, Travellers, and Commercial 
Gentlemen. 

BREAKFASTS, DINNERS, TEAS, 
MARRIAGES, SOIREES, 

AND 

SOCIAL PARTIES 

Purveyed for. 

Charges — Moofratf. 



JAMES BRUNTON, Proprietor. 

ISx, m^ Mn M&mmmihE^&m^ 

CLOTHIERS AND OUTFITTERS, 
1 High Street, DALKEITH, 

Have always on hand a Large and Complete Stock of every 
article requisite for Gentlemen's wear. 

Tailoring- Department. 

Overcoats, in Cheviots and Saxonys, to order, from 44s to 60s. 

Sac Suits, in Scotch Tweeds and Worsteds, to order, from 
48s 6d to 70s, 

Trousers, in Fancy Stripes and Checks, to order, from 13s 6d to 23s. 

Evening Dress Suits, Silk Lined and wnth Silk Facings, a 
Speciality. 

Estimates given for Liveries, 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



THE EAST END 



FUNERAL t DHDERTAKINfi 
^ ESTABLISHMENT, K 

122 HIGH STREET, DALKEITH- 

(Opposite Old CImrch) 

GEORGE SINCLAIR has now made this Department complete 
with New Funeral Car, Hearse, Mourning Coaches, etc., 
of the Newest Designs. All parties entrusting the above work 
to him will get prompt attention and every desired satisfaction in 
a Good Turn Out. 

Trade supplied at special terms. 

House: — The Loan, foot of Back Street. 



DALKEITH BRASS WORKS-GLEBE BANK, DALKEITH 



JOHN HOPE & SON, 

Brassfounders and Engineers, 
aiANUFAGTURERS OF ENC!H[ERS', COLLIERY, HIILL AND FACTORY FURNISHINGS- 

Patent-Welded Iron, StatfordshirP Tubing, and Fittings tor 

Steam and Ga^;. 

Mills, Factories, Public Buildings, &c., fitted for Steam, Water and Gas. 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED. 



£200 Free Insurance - See Coupon 



Fill in Your Nanne at once. 



FIFTEENTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 



-# 



PEf S DipCTOlY ^ 

& Year Boo.c for 1899- 








PAGE 


Dalkeith Societies and Institutions, 


I 


Dalkeith Directory, 


15 


Dalkeith Business Street Directory, 


33 


Dalkeith Professions and Trades Directory, 


41 


Blackshiels, 


70 


Bonnyrigg, ... ....... 


47 


Ford, 


69 


Gilmerton, 


58 


Gorebridge, ... 


^S 


Heriot, 


68 


Lasswade 


52 


Loanhead, 


55 


Milton Bridge and Greenlaw, ... ... ... 


61 


Penicuik, 


62 


Polton, 


54 


Rosewell, 


60 


Roslin, 


60 


Upper Keith, ... 


71 


Together with the 




Workmen's Compensation Act, 




List of the Principal F'airs in Scotland, 




An Almanac of General Information, ^00\ 


Tmrs^^^ 


And List of Mid-Lothian County Councillors, 


^^^-^^^ 


Etc, Etc , 


JAN. 9^' 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



NORTH BRITISH & MERCANTILE 

ESTD. 1809. ESTD. 1800. 

INSURANCE COMPANY. 

FIRE LIFE ANNUITIES. 

TOTAL ASSETS ;^I3,558,989 

TOTAL INCOME 1897 ... ^2,927,988 

LIFE BRANCH. 

Attention is invited to the following Schemes of Life Insurance 
recently adopted by the Company. 

Threefold Option Scheme. 

By wliieli the Policyliolder secures for himself 
A Cash Payment at a stated age, or 

An Annuity for life and a Cash Payment at death, or 
A larger Annuity for life. 

Family Settlement Scheme. 

By which a 5 per cent, investment is secured during life of 
widow — capital remaining unimpaired. 

Provident Assurances for Children Scheme. 

By which parents may secure to their children on attain- 
ing majority the benefit of Life Assurance at an excep- 
tionally low rate of premium irrespective of the state of 
health at that time. 

Children's Endowment Scheme. 

By which Parents may secure a Cash Payment to their children on 
attaining majority. 

Military and Naval Officers' Scheme. 

By which policies free from the outset of all restriction as to 
occupation, residence, and travel, are granted without any extra 
premium. 

ANNUITIES, immediate, Contingent, or Deferred, are granted on favourable terms. 

Net Fire Premiums for 1897, _ - - - ;^i,433,829 

Property of nearly every description Insured at Home or Abroad at the Lowest 

Rates of Premium corresponding to the risk. 

Losses settled with Promptitude and Liberality. 

Prospectuses may he had at the Chief Ofices, Branches, or Agencies. 

r-uTTTTT rkTrTJincQ. /EDINBURGH, 64 Princes Street. 

UHiii^ urriv.nj>. i^Loj^DON, . 61 Tiireadneedle Street, E.G. 

Agents at Dalkeith: 
Anderson & Chisholm, Solicitors. | G. H. Gorrie, Chamberlain's Office. 



See Page 7Q for Sj'^OO Free Insurance 



DALKEITH 

SOCIETIES, INSTITUTIONS, &c. 

Town Holidays — New Year's Day; Queen's Birthday ; Second Wednesday in 
April, August and September. Factory Holidays — Third Monday in April, 
and September. 



Municipal Management 

George Liddell, Provost. 

Dr Robert Lucas, and John C. Chisholm, Bailies. 

William Urquhart, James Dalgleish, Colin Cochrane, R. Handyside, Robert 

Storie, and Robert Murdoch. 

The ordinary meetings are held on the second Monday of each month, 
at 7-15. 

COMMITTEES. 

Bowling Green — George Liddell, convener, Wm. Urquhart and Jas. Dalgleish. 

Cleaning and Lighting — George Liddell, convener, Dr Robert Lucas, and R. 

Murdoch. 

Fire Engine — Colin Cochrane, convener, ■ William Urquhart, and James 

Dalgleish. 

Public Health — Dr Lucas, convener, Colin Cochrane, John C. Chisholm and 
Robert Murdoch. 

Roads and Market — R. Handyside, convener, J. C. Chisholm, James 
Dalgleish, and Robert Storie. 

Water — William Urquhart, convener, George Liddell, R. Handyside, and 

R. Storie. 

Finance — The Conveners of Committees. 

Thomas Sturrock, S.S.C., Municipal Buildings, Clerk to the Coumiissioners. 

William Millar, Treastirer. Walter J. Jones, Collector. 

Alexander Ballantyne, M. D. , Medical Officer. 

Geo. Jack, Burgh Pjvsecntor. 

R. Dryden, hispector of Lodging-houses and Nuisances, Cleaning and Light- 
ing, Surveyor of Dean of Guild Court, and Billet Master. 



Dalkeith 



Post Offices 

Dalkeith Postmistress — Jane L. M'Phersox. 

Deliverii:s. 

First Delivery, - - - - - - - 7.30 A.M. 

Second Delivery, - - - - - - 12.45 P.M. 

Third Delivery, - - - - - - - 5 P.M. 

Fourth Delivery, - - - - - - 7.20 P.M. 

Despatches. 
To Ford, Newtongrange, Cousland, and Millerhill, - - 7. 30A.M. 

First Despatch to Edinburgh, etc. , . . . . 9.25 A.M. 

Second do. do., .... 11.45 a.m, 

Third do. do,, .... ^ p.m. 

Fourth do. do., .... 5.10 p.m. 

Fifth do. do., .... 6.50 p.m. 

Sixth do. do., .... 9.30 P.M. 

Sunday Hours — Delivery, 9 to 10 a.m. (called for). Despatch, 5.50 p.m. 
Parcel Post — Deliveries, 7.30 a.m., 12.45, 5 and 7.20 p.m. Despatches — 

11.30 A.M., 3 and 6.40 p.m. 
EsKBANK Office— Box cleared at 7.45, 11.50 a.m.; 2.45, 6.50, and 9 p.m. 

Sundays, 5 P.M. 

Dalkeith Station Wall Box— Cleared hve minutes after Eskbank hours. 

Muirpark Wall Box cleared at 8.30 a.m.; r.15, 5.50 and 8 p.m. 

Abbey Road Wall Box— 7.45 and 11 a.m., 1.55, 5.10, and 8.55 p.m. 

High St., East Wall Box— 8.5o a.m., 1.30, 5.30 and 9.25 p.m. 

Park Road Wall Box — 9. a.m., 1.30, 6 and 9 p.m. 

Bridgend Wall Box— 9 and 10.50 a.m., 2.50 and 5.50 p.m. 

SUB POST OFFICES. 

Newtongrange — J. N. I Ford— A. D. Wallace I Heriot — Thomas Elder 

Armitstead | Blackshiels--A. Archibald | Tynehead — Wm.Dick 

Millerhill — George King I Upper Keith — E.D.Weir I Temple — ^John Currie 
Cousland— M. M' Alpine | Gorebridge — ^J. Wickham ' Carrington-M. Monilaws 

Banks 

Commercial Bank James Gray, Agent ; James P. Gray, Accotintant. 

National Bank W. Millar, Agent ; W. A. M'Pher.son, Accotintant. 

Royal Bank,..R. L. Paterson and W. Main, Agents ; J. Murray, Accotintant. 

Clydesdale Bank John Craig, Agent ; John R. Campljell, Accotintant. 

Bank of Scotland ...JohnC- Chisholm, Agent; W. Menzies, Accountant. 

Bank Hotirs — Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday, from 10 to 3. 

Thursdays, 10 to 4. Saturdays, 10 to 12. 

DALKEITH SAVINGS' BANK. 

Office — 55 Back Street. Acttiary — R. Handyside. 

Open on Thursdays from it to 3 o'clock ; Saturdays from i to 4, and from 6 

to 8 o'clock. 

Sums received from is to ;i^200, but not more than ;^50 in any one year. 

Societies may deposit much larger sums. The funds are invested vj'\\h 

Government. 

Coaches 

A Coach runs between Dalkeith and Edinburgh via Gilmerton and Liberton 
several times daily. Parcels are also carried. Agent, Miss M'Call, 62 Pligh st. 
Dalkeith and Path head Mail, (carrying Passengers) — Daily, from 

Dalkeith to Pathhead and vice-versa. See time tables. 
Cowing's brakes daily from Dalkeith to Pathhead and Blackshiels and viceversa. 
Brodie's Brakes daily from Dalkeith to RoseWell and vice versa. 



Dalkeith 



Carriers tD and from Dalkeith 



Dewarton— Alex. Scougall, Friday 
Edinburgh— Alex. Bryson, Daily 
Do. — -David Smith, Daily 
Do. & Leitfi — George Watt, Daily 
HuMBlE -David Pendreigh, Saturday 
Leith — Jas. Cruickshanks, Daily 



Magazine, Crichton-dean, & 
Pathhead — William Cockburn. 
From, Friday ; to Saturday 

Pathhead — Alex. Wallace, Tues- 
day and Friday 

Westruther — A. Mossman, Frid. 



Sheriff Circuit Court 

A Sheriff Court is held in the Foresters' Hall, Buccleuch Street, for cases 
under the Small Debt Act and Debts Recovery Act, on the third Thursday of 
every month, at Eleven o'clock, September excepted. A. Rutherfurd, Sherijff: 
John C. C\i\sh.o\m, Sheriff- Clerk Depute. Geo. McHardie, 6'/^^r/^-(9^(:^r. 



JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 



Duke of Buccleuch 
Marquis of Lothian 
Earl of Stair 
Earl of Dalkeith 
Viscount Melville, Las'd 
Viscount Dalrymple 
Sir T. Gibson Carmichael 
Sir George Douglas Clerk 
Sii John D. Hope 
R. Dundas of Arniston 
R. Dundas, jr., Arniston 
D. J. Macfie, Borthwick'll 
James Mercer, Southfiekl 
J. ]. Bell, Broomieknowe 
T. Morton, Redheugh 



John Cowan of Beeslack 
J. T. Burton, Toxside 
Col. Wauchope, Niddrie 
C.Aitchison, Loanhead 
T. Archbald, Lasswade 
W. Ritchie, Middleton 
John Tod, Lasswade 
J. G. Stewart, Lasswade 
D. Blaik, Gorebridge 
John Colder, Loanhead 
Peter Simpson, Pathhead 
Arch. Cowe, Penicuik 
Wm. Dow, Gilmerton 
J. M 'H. Dobbie, Campend 
J. Donaldson, Bonnyrigg 



Geo. Liddell, Dalkeith 
Geo. Douglas, Dalkeith 
R. L. Paterson, Dalkeith 
James Gray, Dalkeith 
George Gray, Dalkeith 
R. Somerville, Dalkeith 
Dr Ballantyne, Dalkeith 
W. White Millar, Dunesk 
J. Romans N'gr'ge ho, 
Jas. Simpson, Fala 
J. C. Dewar of Vogrie 
A. W. Inglis of Glencorse 
Robert Brown, Dalkeith 
R. Ketchen, Bonnyrigg 



County Constabulary— Dalkeith District 
BURGH OF DALKEITH. 

John Forbes, inspector ; A. M. Christie, sergeant; and four police constables. 
DALKEITH DIVISION— John Forbes, Inspector. 



Bonnyrigg — Martin Campbell, and 

A. Scott, constables 
Pathiiead^Geo. Dunbar, constable 
Newbattle— R. Graham, constable. 



Newtongrange — Geo. Little, constable 
Rosewell — A. Wilson, constable 
Lasswade- -A. Kerr, constable 
Cousland — Alex. Bremner 



GOREBRIDGE DIVISION. 

Gorebridge — Sergeant Gardner, and A. Nithrie, constable. 
Stow— F. Wedderburn, constable \ Temple — A. Mitchell, constable 
Heriot — ^J. Kidd, constable. 

PENICUIK DIVISION. 

Penicuik— Alex. Reid, inspector, I Loanhead— A Russel, inspector, and 

and three constables | P. Henderson. 

Milton Cot.— G. Simpson I Straiton— Constables T. Howden and 

Roslin — C. Robson, constable A. Kinloch 



Dalkeith 



Burgh Police Court 

A Police Court is held fortnightly on Monday, at 10.30 o'clock, at which 
police cases and complaints as to breaches of the Police Regulations are dis- 
posed of. Special Courts are also held as necessity requires. 

G. Jack, Burgh- Prosecutor. Thomas Sturrock, Clerk to Court. 

Registry Oflace for Births, Marriages, and Deaths 

The Office, White Hart St., Dalkeith, is open daily (Saturdays excepted) from 
10 A.M. to 4 P.M., and from 6 to 7.30 P.M. Saturdays from 10 A.M. to 2 P.M., 
and from 6 to 7. 30 P. M. Walter J. Jones, Registrar. 

Burgh School Board of Dalkeith 

Elected 1897. 

William Watson, Chairman ; W. Millar, John C. Chisholm, D, Grieve, 
Dr Robert Lucas, R. Handyside, and E. B. Richards. 

T. Sturrock, Clerk and Treasurer ; Jas. Cavanagh; Compiilsory Officer. 

Parish School Board 

Elected 1897. 

Rev. And. Gray, D.D. , Chairman ; John McHutchen Dobbie, Campend; John 
Dickson, Buccleuchpl; Richard L. Paterson, Royal bank; Ivie Warden, Easter 
Cowden. George H. Gorrie, Clerk and Treas. Henry J. Jones, Officer. 

Newbattle School Board 

Elected 1897. 

J. Romans, Nev^^tongrange , Chairman ; Rev. J. C. Carrick, Newbattle ; Rev. 
A. Hardie, Newtongrange ; John Callender, Newbattle Colliery; and Johnson 
N. Armitstead, Kewtongrange. Walter J. Jones, Clerk and Treastirer. John 
Mackay, Officer. 



Schools 



High School — Wm. Young ; Wm. 
Lindsay, and Miss M. Nisbet, 
assistants. 

Dalkeith Academy — W. E. Smith; 
Thos. Smith, and Misses Whyte 
and Currie. 

St. Mary's School — Boys Depart- 
ment — }. E. Sherrin ; Girls' De- 
partment — Miss Baldry. 

St. David's School — Under the care 
of the Sisters of Mercy. 



Burgh Public School — Patrick 
Marshall, M.A. ; Jas. Martin, 
Wm. Baikie, and Misses Black, 
Swan, Baillie, and Baxter. 
Secondary School, G. N. Ritchie, 
M.A., and Miss Hogg. 

Private Schools — Miss Shiells, 
Rosehill ; Mr and Mrs Ames, 
Lothian bank. 



Educational Institute of Scotland— Dalkeith Branch 

The members hold occasional meetings at which papers on educational 
matters are read and discussed. 

Pres^ Wm. Chalmers, Secy., R. Henderson; Treas., P. Stirling. 



Jbalkeith 



Clergy in Dalkeith- Churches with Hours of Service 



Parish Church — Rev. Andrew Gray, D.D., Rev Andrew \ 

Gray, B.D., Assistant ... .. .../ 

Buccleuch or West Parish Church — Rev. H. Farquhar, B. D. 
Free Church, Buccleuch St. —Rev. N. D. Maclachlan, B.D. 
Buccleuch Street United Presbyterian Church — Rev. J. ~| 

Fraser ... ... ... ... .../ 

King's Park United Presbyterian Church — Rev. Andrew 1 

Hunter, B.D. ... ... ... ... j 

Congregational Church, High Street — Rev. Wm. M. R. \ 

M'Aleese ... ... ... ... ...] 

E. U. Congregational Church, Croft Street — Rev. R. D. ) 

Mitchell ... ... ... ... .../ 

Wesleyan Methodist Ch. , Westfield— Rev. E. S. Eillis 

Baptist Church, London Road — Rev. H. Maclean 

St Mary's Episcopal Church, Dalkeith Park— Rev. W. \ 

Smith-Dorrien, B.D. ... ... ... ... / 

St David's Roman Catholic Church, Eskbank Road — 1 9 

Rev. Joseph Head and Rev. P. Sherlock. . . . j 

Clergy in Adjoining Parishes 



II A.M. and 2 P.M. 

1 1 A. M. and 6 P. M. 
II A.M. and 2 P.M. 

1 1 A. M. and 2 P. M. 
II A. M. and 2 P. M. 

II A.M. & 6.30 P.M. 

II A.M. and 2 P.M. 

II A.M. & 6-30 P.M. 

II A.M. and 2 P.M. 

II A.M. & 3-30 P.M. 

9, 11-30 A.M., and 
6 P.M. 



CHURCH 

Borthwick— Walter Waddell 
Carrington — W. G. Core, M.A. 
Cockpen— D. W. L. Wallace 
Cranston — George S. Smith, D.D. 
Crichton— A. W. Fergusson, B.D. 
Fala and vSoutra — ^James Hunter 
Glencorse — W. B. Strong, B.D. 
Heriot— John Francis Brown 
Inveresk — ^James Sharp 
Lasswade — ^J. A. Burdon 
Loanhead — Alexander Stewart 



OF SCOTLAND 

Newton— John McBeth, B.D. 
Newbattle— John C. Carrick, B.D. 
New Craighall — Archibald Prentice 
Northesk— H. M. M'Gill 
Ormiston — Wm. Johnstone, B.D. 
Penicuik — R. Thomson, B.D. 
Rosewell — ^John Hunter, B.D. 
Roslin —Joseph Loudon, M.A. 
Stobhill— David Wilson, M.A. 
Temple— J. W. Blake, M.A. 



FREE CHURCH. 



Newbattle — Alex. Hardie 
Ormiston — Thomas Robertson 
Penicuik— Robt. T. Jack, M.A. 
Roslin — David Barnetson 
I Temple — R. Gilmour. 



Carlops— W. W. Aitken ; George W. 

Taylor, M.A., Col. and Sue. 
Cockpen — R. Thomson Loudon. B.D. 
Gorebridge— H. M'Lean, B.D. 
Loanhead — Wm. Johnston, M.A. 
Musselburgh — Alex. W^right, M.A. | 

UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

Fala— John Watt I Musselburgh — Alex. Scott, B.D. 

Ford— Andrew Gemmell, B.D. [ Do. — David Gilchrist 

Gorebridge — Robert James, M.A. | Penicuik — ^John M'Kerrow, B.A. 
Howgate — David Thomas, M.A. I Tranent — ^J. Dick Fleming, B.D. 

Lasswade -W. P. Rodgerson, M.A. | Straiton and Pentland — D. Sutherland 

Indigent Sick Society 

This Society, instituted 1808, bestows its benefactions in cases, which do 
not properly come within the scope of parochial aid. It is maintained by 
contributions made annually. 

George Douglas, President. 
Thomas Porteous, Secretary, George Gray, Treasurer, 



Dalkeith 



The General Town Mission 

This Mission was organised in 1846, with the object of extending the 
knowledge of Divine truth among the inhabitants of Dalkeith and vicinity bv 
employing a missionary whose duty it is to visit, and read the Scriptures'. 
Meetings are held in the Douglas Memorial Hall, Tait Street. The affairs of 
the Mission are conducted by a Committee, composed of the ministers of the 
town (if subscribers), and members of the various rehgious denominations, and 
is supported by voluntary contributions. 

President — George Douglas. Secretary and TreasiD-er — Robert Wight. 

Missionary— ']2.vl\.q.'~, Fleming. 

Nursing- Association 

Formed in 1895, affiliated with the Scottish Branch of Queen Victoria's 
Jubilee Institute for Nurses. 

Pre,sident — Duchess of Buccleuch ; Vice-President — Mrs Wauchope of Niddrie; 

Ho7i. Secretary — Mrs R. Somerville; Hon. Treasurer — ^James Dawson. 

Royal Infirmary Auxiliary Society 

This Society was instituted in 1841, and raises annually, by voluntary sub- 
scriptions, upwards of ^^70. When contributions from other parties are taken 
into account, Dalkeith contributes annually to the Royal Infirmary above £"100. 

William Millar, banker, Secretary and Treasztrer. 

Dalkeith Auxiliary to National Bible Society of Scotland 

This Society, which was formed in 1S64, has for its object the circulation 
of the Scripture in the native tongue throughout the world. 
Robert Wight, Secy, and Treas. 

Inland Revenue— Excise Licences 

Licences can be obtained from Collectors of Inland Revenue, Stamp 
Offices, and at Post Office, Dalkeith. Gun and Dog Licences are also issued 
at any ordinary Money Order Office. William Lyons, jMusselburgh, Officer. 

For every Carriage with four I Armorial Bearings otherwise 

or more wheels, and fitted | used, - - ■ - - £l l o 

to be drawn by 2 or more I To carry a gun (expiring 31st 

horses or mules, or by me- | Jidy), - - - - o 10 o 
chanical power - - ;i^2 2 o | Yearly Game Licence (opir- 

For every Carriage with four I ing 31st July), - - 300 

or more wheels, and fitted I Part Year, ending 3Tst Oct., 200 

to be drawn by I horse or | Plalf Year, cnth'ng 31st July, 200 

mule only, - - - i i o Gamekctper's Licence (cxpir- 



For every carriage with less 

than four wheels, - - o 15 o 
Hackney Carrrage, - -0150 
For every Male Servant, -015 o 
For every Dog, - - -076 
Armorial Bearings on Car- 



ing 31st July), 

Game Dealer's Licence (ex- 
piring 1st July), - 

Hawker's Licence (expiring 
31st March), 

Occasiona] Came Licence(for 



riages, - - - - 2 2 o | 14 days) 



Dalkeith 



Parish Council 

Wf New Ofifices — White Hart St. (formerly Anderson & Chisholm's). 
Elected 1S98. The Council meets on the evening of the tirst Tues- 
day of every month. The gross rental for the year 1897-8 was ^^41,046 2s 2d, 
Total assessments collected for 1897-93 — Poor Rate, Registration and Valua- 
tion, Burgh and Parish School Rate and Landward Special Rate ;!^2729 15s 7d4. 
The assessment for the Poor for the current year is at the rate of i/- per £; 
Burgh School Rate, 8d pei- £ ; Parish School Rate, lod per £ ; Registration 
Rate, ^d per £; Landward Special Rate, nil. 

Note. — The gross rental for the current year is ;!^40,090 12s iid. 
Medical Officer — Ur Robert Lucas. Inspector and Clerk — Walter J. Jones. 

Members — 
Burgh. — William Young, Chairman; John C. Chisholm, Robert Brown, 
Stephen Plair, Ebenezer P'orrester, V\/'illiam Watson, William C. Byers, 
Wm, M'Gill, John Garment, John Fraser, James Bruce, James Brown, and 
Mrs A. Jane Somerville. 

Landward Representatives — Ivie Warden and John Dickson. 
Landward Committee Elected 1898 — 
Ivie Warden, John Dickson, Joseph Simpson, Abner Borthwick, and James 
L. Gray. 

The Union Poorhouse 

Is a large and commodious structure, situated at Eskbank, Dalkeith. It 
is capable of accommodating 120 inmates, and was erected at a cost of upwards 
of ;:^4000. It was opened for the poor of four parishes in 1849, but there are 
now twelve parishes in combination. In order to provide additional 
accommodation for the sick, the building was extended in 1867, the workshop 
being also enlarged, at a cost of about ;!<,8oo. The average number of inmates 
during the past year has been 55. There have been 16 deaths, the average age 
being 69 years. 

Members of Poorhouse Board— 1897-98. 

1. Dalkeith— Robt. Wight, Robert { 5. Newbattle — James Snodgrass, 

Brown, J McHutchen Dobbie, | David Lowe. 

William Watson. | 6. Cockpen — James Moffat, 

2. LiBERTON — G Dickson, T Bowie, j Thomas Robertson. 

D. S. M 'Donald. I 7. Cranston— James Mercer. 

3. Lasswade— Geo. Storie, J. Scott. | 8. Temple — Rev J. W. Blake. 

Arch. Gilchrist | 9. Borthwick — D. Duncan. 

4. Newton — ^John M'Farlane, John I 10. Crichton — Robert Maclean 

Gray. | ii. Carrington— Adam Inch. 

12. Fala and Soutra — William Prentice. 

Chair /nan — R. Wight. 

Seo'etary and Treasurer — ^James Gray, Commercial Bank. 

Medical Officer — Dr Alex. Ballantyne. 

Governor— Qi&o. R. Hutton. Matron — Mrs Jiutton, 

Independent Order of Rechabites 

Salford Unity. 
Phoenix Tent, 2042. Instituted 31st Oct. 1890. James Gray, C.R. 
John M' Allan, Secretary. Meets every alternate Friday, in the Templar's 
Hall, at 8 o'clock. Abstainers are admitted up to 50 years of age. 

Edinburgh District, No. 35.— D.C. Ruler, Jas. M'Kinlay; D. Secy., 
Robert Simpson. D.S.J.T., A. Bennet. 



S Dalkeith 



Dalkeith Total Abstinence Society 

Instituted 1837. Object — The complete suppression of Intemperance. 

Hon. President — ^John Davidson. 

Hon. Vice-President — George Gray. 

President— R.^v. R. D. Mitchell. 

Vice-President — R. T. Taylor. 

Treas. — ^John Davidson, jun. Secretary — J. Garment, (y"] High Street. 

Gommittee — The above office-bearers, and — 

J. Davidson, John Davidson, iron mills, Geo. A. Aitken, Richard Allan, 

Miss Finlayson, Miss Dalgleish, Miss Nellie Davidson, and Miss Mitchell. 

Dalkeith Temperance Federation 

Instituted 1898. 
Pres., Rev R. D. Mitchell; Vice-Pres. W. Buchan; Secy. John Davidson, jr. 
Treas. T. Wallace. 

British Women's Temperance Association, SCU. 

President — Mrs R. Somerville; Vice-President — Miss Macfarlane; Secy. — 
Mrs Grieve; Ti'eas. — Miss Stirling. 

Eskdale Band of Hope — Pres. Mrs Grieve; Secy.., Miss Somerville; Assistant, 
Miss Grouch. 

There is also a Savings Bank, in Douglas Hall, on Mondays at 7 p.m. 

"Daniel" Band of Hope 

Instituted 1877. 

Meets in the Gongregational Ghurch every alternate Thursday at 7-30 p.m. 

Hon. President — George Gray. President — Robert Somerville. Vice-Pres. 
— RevW. M. R, M'Aleese. Secretary— T. A. Buncle. Treasurer — A. Brown. 

There is also a INIutual Improvement Association in connection with this Band 
of Hope. Hon-Pres., R. Somerville; Pres., A. S. Gray; Vice-Pres., John 
Meek; 5^rj/, Peter B. Garment; Treas., Miss Flockhart. 

Buccleuch Street Band of Hope 

This Society was formed in November 1887. Meetings are held every 
alternate Friday evening at 7-15. President — Rev. James Fraser ; Vice-Pres. 
Robert Baxter; Superintejident — Robert Baxter; Secretary — William Fal- 
coner; Treasurer — Mrs Kirk. 



Westfield Band of Hope 

President — James Golder. Vice- 'res..]. S.Morrison. Sccv., Miss H. Golder. 
Meets in the Factory Hall every Thursday evening at 7 p.m. The number of 
members on the roll is 120. 



Dalkeith 



Scientific Association 

This Society, instituted in 1832, holds occasional meetings for reading 
essays on literary or scientific subjects. There is a good library of books con- 
nected with the Society, and the more important magazines are circulated 
among the members. The library is open on Mondays and P'ridays, from 6 to 
7 o'clock. The annual payment is 5s, or with magazines as published 6s, The 
number of members is about 120. 

Directors, 
Robert Storie, President; Geo. H. Gorrie, Vice-President ; Walter J. 
Jones, Hon Secretary; Thomas Kemp, Hon Treasurer; Jas. Dalgleish, Patrick 
Marshall, Dr Whyte, George H. Gorrie, George M'Dougal, Edward Ames, 
William Young, Dr Lucas, Wm, Millar, Malcolm Dunn, Peter Stirling, 
and Robert Storie. 

Lewis Young, jun., Librarian. 

"West Parish Scientific Association. 

Formed in 1892. _ Meetings are held on the last Tuesday of each month 
during winter, at which lectures are delivered on subjects of scientific, literary, 
or antiquarian interest. There is a library of scientific works in connection; 
annual subscription, is. A Summer Science Class is also held weekly during 
May, June, and July, conducted by Rev. H. Farquhar. 

President — Thomas Alison. Joint-Secretai-ies — C. J. B. Dalgleish and H. 
PL Greig. Treastircr—Q,. Dalgleish. Librarian — H. Greig. 

Buccleuch Street U.P. Literary Society. 

This Society has for its object the moral and intellectual improvement of the 
members by means of Essays, Debates etc. 

Hon. President — Rev. James Eraser. President — Alfred F. Davidson. 
Vice- Presidents — Miss J. W. Aitken and James A. Tod. Treasurer — 
Thos. Kemp. Secretary — Thomas S. Somerville. Covimittee—W\%^ Alison, 
Mrs Davidson, Mrs Kirk, W. R. Aitken, Thos. Alison, Robert Baxter. 

Dalkeith Philharmonic Society 

Instituted 1875 

Hon. President — The Duke of Buccleuch. 
Hon. Vice-Presidents. 
The Earl of Stair I The Marquis of Lothian I The Earl of Dalkeith 

Viscount Melville j SirRobt. Dundas, Arniston | 

Conductor — Charles Guild. Accompanist — Miss Steven. 
Secretary^ Peter D. Dalgleish. Treas7irer, Geo. W. Porteous. Libraria7i, Geo. 
A. Aitken. President, James A. Tod. Vice-President, S. Potter. Coinmittee, 
W. C. Gray, James L. Gray, A. S. Gray, Wm. Main, jr., and W. Steven. 

Dalkeith Harriers 

This Club was formed in November 1889, with the object of promoting 
athletics generally, and particularly cross country running during the winter 
months. 

President — Rev. Dr Gray; Vice-Presidents — ^Jas. C. Paterson, Jas. P. 
Gray, and George G oldie; Captain — C. E. Alison; Vice- Captain — R. E. 
Benner; Hon. Secy, and Trcas., L. C. Dalgleish; Committee — Robert Dods, 
T. W. Dods, Arch. Dods, jun., Ingram Muirhead. 

Head Quarters^Cricket House. 



iO I)atkeitk 



Dalkeith Bowling Club 

Formed in 1857. 

This Club possesses a green of large dimensions — being 40 yards long by 
45 broad, which is well kept, and situated at a convenient distance from the 
town. The entry-money — including first year's subscription — is 20s, and the 
annual subscription, 123 6d. 

The Duke of Buccleuch — Patron. 

Dr Lucas, President. J. E. Sherrin, Vice-President. J. R. Burnett, Secretary. 

Richard Dodds, Treasurer. W. F. Duncan, Ranger. 

J. Inglis, Wm. Robb, James Kinnear, and J, Irvine, Directors. 

Dalkeith Cricket Club 

For the use of this Club the late Duke of Buccleuch kindly turfed and 
railed off a portion of the King's Park near the Railway Station, where members 
practice in the evening, and play matches on Saturdays during the Summer 
Season. 

Patron — The Duke of Buccleuch. 

Vice- Patrons — The Marquis of Lothian, the Earl of Dalkeith, and 
the Hon. Hew Dalrymple. 

President — Charles Craig. 

Captain — Geo. Goldie. Vice- Captain — Ing. Muirhead. Hon. Secretary^ 

— [as. N. Murdoch, 25 High st. Hon. Treasicrer — H. O. Macgregor. 

Captain of 2nd XL — P, Rough. Hon. Secy. — R. E. Benner. 
Dalkeith Curling" Club 

This Club was instituted in 1839, and in 1841 was admitted into the Royal 
Caledonian Curling Club. 

Patrons — Duke of Buccleuch and Marquis of Lothian; President — ^John T. 
Laing; Vice- President -i — Dr R. Lucas and W. H. Gray, B.D.; Secy, and 
Treas. — A. Gray, jun. 

Dalkeith Lawn Tennis Club (Limited) 

This Club was formed in 1888. There are three courts situated at Bank- 
head, Eskbank road. The Entry-money is — Ladies, 5s, and Gentlemen, 5s. 
The Annual Subscription for Playing Members — Ladies, los 6d, and Gentle- 
men, £1 I. Annual Subscription for Honorary Members, 5s. 

Directors — Dr Ballantyne, J. C. Chisholm, Abram Douglas, J. A. Tod, 
R. Handyside, Dr Lucas, A. M'Lennan, W. Millar, and William Urquhart. 
Secretary — ^J. C. Chisholm. Treasurer — Wm. Millar. 
Auditor — R. Handyside. 

Rangers Football Club 

This Club, which was formed in October 1889, has the use of Dods' Park, 
Bridgend, and there matches are played on Saturday afternoons during the 
season. Hon Secretary — A. Wright. 



batkeith ll 



Golf Clubs 

Dalkeith and Newbattle Golf Club— 

The King's Park, Newbattle, was leased from Lord Lothian, anJ a 9-hole 
course laid out in 1896. There are 200 members. 

President — -Lord Lothian; Vice-President — Ex-Provost Murdoch ; Captain — 
Dr Lucas; Vice-Captain — John T. Laing; Secretary — ^D. W. Anderson; 
TreusiLrer — ^J. G. Patterson. 



Dalkeith- Formed in July 1880. 

Captain — ^John Lo^/rie; Vice- Captain, Charles Guild ; Secretary and 

Treasurer — Charles L-uild ; Chaplain — Rev. Dr Gray ; Committee of A'lanage- 
ment — ^Dr Ballantyne, W. Millar, J. P. Gray, J. Laing, W. Urquhart, Dr 
Lucas, and Rev. A. A. Gray. 

Winner of Gold Challenge Medal — Rev. A. A. Gray. 

Cycling" Clubs 

Dalkeith. 

W. A. M'Pherson, President-, P. Deas, Captain; A. Keddie, Vice-Capt.; 
Secretary and Treaszirer, J. La\\son. W. Glass, A. Balgarnie and W. Scott, 
Committee. 

D.B PL 

Thomas A. Buncle, Captain; Andrew S. Gray, Vice-Capt.; J. Maxwell 
Garment. Secretary and Treasurer; Miss N. Young, T. A. Buncle, W. Kemp, 
and H. M'Dougal, Committee. 

Homing" Pigeon Society 

The object of this Society is the promotion of pigeon fancy by soci«l inter- 
course, discussion of the varieties, training, racing, and improvement of the 
various varieties of pigeons. 

Ho7i. Preside7it — ^John Watson. President — Alexander Nisbet. 

Secy, and Ireas. — ^James Preacher; and 6 of a Committee. 

3rd Battalion The Royal Scots 

Head-Quarters — Glencorse. 

Establishment of the Corps (all Ranks), 904. 

Officers. 

Hoji. Colonel — The Marquis of Lothian, K.T. 

Lieut. -Colonel Commaiuiing — Col. George Grant Gordon C.B. (late Scots 

Guards). 

Staff Officers. 
Adjutant and Captain — PI. H. Francis, (late 1st Batt.). Surgeon-Lieut .-Col . , 
Robert Lucas, M.D. Quartermaster—^ . F. Horniblow (Hon. Capt.) 
(late 1st Battahon). 



i^ l)alketth 



The Corn Exchange 

Opened in August 1854. It is one of the most commodious structures of 
the kind in Scotland ; was erected from plans by D. Cousin, architect, Edin- 
burgh, at a cost of £z^O':i, and it is maintained by poll-tax, paid by entrants, 
rent of stalls, &c. The great hall is 172 feet in length by 50 feet wide, and 
about 45 feet high. The management is carried on by a committee of the 
Burgh Commissioners. 

W. Millar, National Bank, Treasurer for Dalkeith Burgh Commissioners. 

William Clark, Officer. 

Corn Market 

The weekly Grain Market for the sale of Wheat, Oats, Barley, Peas, and 
Beans, is held on Thursdays in the Corn Exchange. The grain is pitched in 
bulk, and all purchase, are paid prompt cash. Business opens at 11.45, when 
the sale of oats commences. The market for wheat and beans opens at 12; 
and barley at 12. 15. 

Total Quantities of Grain for Sale in Dalkeith Corn Market for the Years 
ending September 1897 and September 1898. 





Qrs. Wheat. 


Qrs 


. Oats. 


Qrs 


. Barley. 


Qrs. Beans. 


To September 1897 
1898 


125 
80 




86584 
61424 




476 
307i 


10 
10 


Decrease 


45 




25^6i 




1 681 


- 




Totals 


to September 
Do. 


%\ 




92694 
65394 



Decrease, 2730 

Thos. Kemp, Market Clerk. 

Dalkeith Agricultural Society 

Instituted 1805 

This vSociety was designed to promote improvements in Agriculture and 
rearing of Stock. Three exhibitions are held annually— one in March for oats, 
barley, beans, and potatoes ; — (the annual business meeting is held on the day 
of the potato show), one on last Saturday of July for horses, cattle, sheep, etc., 
and one in October for seed wheat. It consists of about 220 members. 

President— T\iQ Duke of Buccleuch ; Senior Vice-President — R. Dundas. 
Treasurer and Secretary — ^John McHutchen Dobbie, Campend. 

Committee— 

Robert Ainslie, John Edgar, Wm. Harper, Ivie Warden, Thos. Torrance, 
Jas. Deans, A. Howie, William Park, George Pendreigh, Thos. M. Skirving, 
W. Crichton, J. S. Dickson, Adam Gardner, Wm. Howden, Stair M'Harrie. 



Dalkeith 13 



Dalkeith Liberal Association 

This Association was formed in February 1878 for the promotion of 
Liberal principles in the town and district. In connection with the Association 
there was opened, in December 1881, a Hall for a Reading-Room, etc., and 
Meetings. The Reading-Room is open every lawful day from 9 a.m. to 
10 P.M., and is provided with newspapers and magazines, also billiard tables 
and other amusements. The Office-Bearers for 1898-99 are — President, James 
Gray; Vice-Presidents, Robt. Brown, A. F. Davidson and Adam Thomson; 
Treas., Thos. Taylor; Secy., R. Handyside. 

Dalkeith Women's Liberal Association 

This Association w" formed in 1895. Object — To promote and extend 
the knowledge of sounc .id Liberal principles. 

Pres. — Mrs A. Dalgleish. Vice-Pres. — Mrs Secy. — Mrs J. 

Garment, Melville Terrace, Eskbank. Treas. — Mrs Allan, Tayville. 

Dalkeith District Conservative Association 

The Reading and Recreation Rooms belonging to the Association are open 
every lawful day from 9 A.M. to 10 P.M., and are furnished with newspapers 
and magazines. There is also a billiard table and facilities for other games. 
Membership upwards of 650. 

President — The Earl of Dalkeith. 
Vice-Presidents — Robert Lucas, ALD. ; John McHutchen Dobbie ; Peter 
Stirling; Major Young; Sir Charles Dalrymple; J. C. Patterson; Provost Liddell. 
Secy, and Treas. — C. H, Jones; and 30 Members of Committee. 

Junior Conservative Club 

This Club holds meetings in its Hall, and has for its object the mutual im- 
provement of members. Hon. President — The Earl of Dalkeith ; Hon. Vice- 
President — Peter Stirling ; Hon. Secy and Treas. — C. W. Benner; Committee 
J. D. Main, A. Forrest, W. Chouler, W, Muirhead, and Ingram Muirhead. 

Dalkeith and District Liberal Unionist Association 

Instituted 1887. The object of this Association is the adoption and 
furtherance of Liberal principles in the constituency, including the maintenance 
of legislative union between Great Britain and Ireland. 

President — Robert Murdoch, Vice-Presidents — David Grieve, James 
Dalgleish, and Abram Douglas. Secretary and Treasurer — George Jack, 

S.S.C. Committee — R. Somerville, D. Thomson, John Payton, John 
Davidson, jun., John Landers, Geo. Alex. Aitken, John Davidson, James 
Scott, William Porteous, James Aitken, and J. Wallace. 

Irish National League of Great Britain 

" DAWN OF LIBERTY " BRANCH, Instituted 1887. 
The object of the League is the attainment of that form of self-government 
which is desired by the majority of the Irish people, and other reforms. 



14 Dalkeith 



6th Volunteer Battalion The Eoyal Scots 

Staff Officers. 
Colonel — Sir George D. Clerk, Bart,, late Lieutenant 2nd Life Guards. 
Lieut. Col. — R. G. W. Ramsay, Captain 2nd H.L.L 
Adjutant — Major W. E. G. Login, Royal Scots. 
Quartermaster — Capt. Craster. 

Stirgeons—']. Cameron, J. D. Cox, Alex. Ballantyne, and C. Allan. 

AcijHg Chaplains — Revs. Andrew Gray, D.D., J. A. Burdon, R. Thomson, 

M. Gardner, J. Sharp, A. Stewart, and J. Boyd. 

Officers of the Dalkeith Companies (A.B.C.) 

J.Dawson, Major; C. E. Hutchinson, and D. W. Anderson, Capts ; 

James Eraser, J. L. Cockburn and W. T. Urquhart, Lieutenants. 

Sergeant Instructor— C. Brady, Royal Scots. 

Dalkeith Youths' Friendly Society 

This is the oldest permanent Benefit Society in Dalkeith, making provision 
for its members in sickness, in old age, and at death, and has existed for upwards 
of ninety years. Capital, ^1753; number of members, 304. Its present Ofifice- 
Bearers and Committee are — J. Lindsay, President ; James M'Lareri, sen., 
and Andrew Haig, Vice-Presidents ; David Thomson, Treasjt-rer; John 
Deans, Secretary. Committee — William M'Laren, William Proctor, William 
Hare, William Dalgetty, William Monteith, Thomas Crawford. Trustees — 
W. A. M'Pherson and Geo. Liddell. Auditors — ^J. Biggans and R. Young. 

National Independent Order of Oddfellows 

LOYAL STAR OF MID^LOTHIAN LODGE, No. 929. 

This Lodge was opened on 15th of March 1877, and is a branch of the 
Edinburgh District. It makes provisions for its members in sickness and at 
death. Admits members from 9 to 40 years of age, and honorary members 
at any age above 18 years. Meetings held every second Friday evening, in 
the Masonic Hall, for the purpose of initiating new members, &c. It has a 
membership of about 840. Capital, ^^1750 

Officers for 1899. — ^John Loudon, G.M. ; George A. Aitken, N.G. ; 
R. Roy, Treas. ; Dr J. Curtis Whyte, Surgeon ; T. Sim, Secy. 

Independent Order of Good Templars 

St. John's Lodge, No. 72. — Instituted 2nd July 1870. Thos. Hope, 
C.T. ; Jas. Naylor, Secretary; John McAllan, Z.i?. Meets on Tuesdays 
at 8 o'clock in their Hall, High st. 

Diamond Jubilee Lodge ISTo. 755, meets every Thursday in the Ciood 
Templar's Hall. T. Wal'ace, C. T. J. Colvin, Secy. 

Lodge Dalkeith Kilwinning- [of Freemasons,] No. lO 

Was instituted in December 1724. It possesses a Hall, in which the meet- 
■ ings are held. R. W.M., G. Liddell: Treas., J. Morton ; Secy., A. Chisolm. 



-^g^-<^^ 



Population of Police Burgh, 6870. 



^ Abernethy, D. A., clerk, Gladstone cottage 
' Adams, Alexander, tailor, Young's cl 
Adams, James, painter, 128 High st 
Adams, Wm., labourer. Young's cl 
Addison, Henry, groom, Chalmer's cl 
Affleck, James, boot and shoemaker, 96 

High St ; house 4 Muirpark pi 
Ainslie, Mrs, Ancrum road 
Aithie, John, guard, 5 Westfield cotts 
Aithie, George, guard, 3 Muirpark 
Aitken, Richard, billposter. North wynd 
AITKEN, JAMES, shoemaker, 20 South 

St ; house 71 High st — see.advt 
Aitken, John, M.R.C.V.S., White Hart st 
Aitken,}, jr., M.R.CA^.S., White Hart st 
Aitken, Miss, dressmaker, 71 High st 
Aitken, George Alex., printer, 36 High st 
Aitken, Mrs, "Harford ho, Waverley rd 
Aitken, Miss, Orwell bank 
Aitken, Miss, 55 Back st 
Aitken, Mrs W. , grocer, etc. , 95 High st 
Alexander, J. , & Co. , shoemakers, 46 High st 
Alexander, Mrs, 92 Rack st 
Ahson, John (W. A. & Son), Buccleuch st 
Alison, John P., farmer, D'ar^-y 
Ahson, J\Irs Thomas, Rosehili, Eskbank 
Alison, William, & Son, coachbuilders, 

&c, , Buccleuch st 
Alison, Wm., postman. Croft st 
Allan, D. , engine driver, Brunton's cl 
Allan, John, grocer, wine and spirit mer- 
chant, 26 South st ; house 27 South st 
Allan, John, shoemaker, Wardlaw's cl 
Allan, Mrs, 7 Esk pi 
Allan, Mrs Jane, 14 Esk pi 
Allan, Richard, Tayville, Park rd 
Ames, Ed. , teacher, Dalhousie rd 
Anderson, W. M., Belmont 
Anderson, Wm., sawyer, 17 Jane pi 
Anderson, Mrs, Relief pi 
Anderson, Mrs, Newmills rd 
Anderson, Mrs, Lothian st 
Anderson, David W., S-S<C., Hazelbank 



Anderson, Mrs W. P. , Hazelbank, Esk'bk 
Anderson, James, tinsmith and gas fitter, 

56 High st ; house 6 Lothian bank 
Anderson, Miss, Wardlaw's cl 
Anderson, Mrs John, 12 High st 
Anderson, Mrs Joseph, Berrie's ct 
Anderson, Jas. W., postman, 12 High st 
Anderson, John, labourer, Dalkeith park 
Anderson, John S. , miller, 1 1 Jane pi 
Anderson, Robert, joiner, Millerhill 
Anderson, Robt., irondresser, Tolbooth cl 
Anderson, Andrew, Smeaton shaw 
Anderson &Chisholm, S.S.C. , Woodville 
Anderson, Wm. , sawyer, 1 7 Jane pi 
Anderson, W. , moulder. White's close E. 
Andison, Miss Margaret, Buccleuch st 
iVndison, Mrs, Lothian ter 
Andrew, Wm., Melville villas 
Andrew, James, moulder, 66 High st 
Andrews, James, Tolbooth cl 
Andrews, Henry, labourer, 128 High st 
Andrews, W. , irondresser, 68 High st 
ARCHER, G. B. W., chemist, 87 High st 

— see advt 
Archibald, Mrs, lol Lligh st 
Armitstead, Johnson N., boot and shoe- 
maker. Post Office. Newtongrange 
Armstrong, George, 113 High st 
Arnot, Jas., plumber, Plummer's cl 
Arnot, Mrs, 10 Jane pi 
Aytuun, Alexander, Chalmers' cl 
Aytoun, Rich., jr.. North wynd 
Aytoun, Richd., publican, 172 High st 



Baigrie, William, corkcutter, loi High st 
Baillie, James, groom Dalkeith park 
Baillie, John, groom, 90 Back st 
Baillie, William, Thornybank 
Baillie, Thomas, coachbuilder, London rd 



16 



Dalkeith 



Bain, Miss, 65 High st 
Bain, Wm., farmer, Cairnie, Newton 
Bain, John, gardener, Hadfast, Cousland 
Baird, Francis, painter, Roberton's c) 
BAIRD, GEO. A., clothier, 68 High st; 

house 41 Mitchell st — see advt 
Baird, Robert, engineer. Young's cl 
Baker, Wm, hairdresser, 6 South st 
Baldry, Mrs S. T., 163 High st 
Ballantyne, Alex., M.D., Ashton 
Balgarnie, Mrs J., Elmfield pi 
Bambery, Robt., smith. Wester Cowden 
Bank of Scotland, Woodville, Eskbank 
Baptie,C. & R., carters, Harelaw, Newton 
Baptie, W. B., knitter. Miller's cl 
Barber, Arch., carter, Eskdaill st 
Barber, Mrs, Buccleuch st 
Barclay, John, joiner, Berrie's court 
Barclay, Mrs, Melville villas 
Barker, Arch., fireman, iVHan's cl 
Barnes, Gavin J. D., teacher, Cranston 
Barnes, John, gardener, Bridgend 
Bathgate, R., Buccleuch st 
Baxter, Jas. , gardener, Redrow, Newton 
Baxter, Robert, forester, Lugton 
Beaton, Mrs, Roberton's cl 
Bee, David, vanman, Roberton's cl 
Bee, James, labourer, Roberton's cl 
Bee, Thomas, cellarman, 15 Back st 
Bell, Alex, brushmaker, 86^ High st 
Bell, Alex., gas manager. Croft st 
Bell, David, miller, Lugton 
Bell, Miss, dressmaker, Edinburgh rd 
Bell, Mrs C. , Lugton 
Bell, Mrs, Buccleuch st 
Bell, Peter, labourer, Gray's cl. W. 
Bellamy, Mrs, 1 1 Westfield pk 
Benner, John R., agent. Midland Railway 

Company, Edin. : house Torsonce rd 
Bennett, G. W., brushmaker, 10 Abbey rd 
Bennett, Mrs R., 80 High st 
Bennett, Mrs Arthur, brush manufac- 
turer, 182 High st 
Bertram, T., plumber, Larkfield 
Beveridge, John, 43 Back st 
Beveridge, Robt., dairyman, Easthouses 
Beveridge, Robt., joiner, Lothian rd 
BEVERIDGE, T., gasfitter, plumber, &c.. 

White Hart st — see advt. 
Bickenstaff, Thomas, 7 Westfie'd park 
Biggar, Robt., engineman, 117 High st 
Biggins, John, brushmaker. Back st cot. 
Binnie, Wm., brush finisher, 13 Esk pi 
Bishop, Robert, grocer, 33 High st; house, 
29 Mitchell st 



Bishop, William, grocer, 24 Mitchell st 
Black, James, plumber. White's close west 
Black, Wm. , labourer, 176 High st 
Blaik, Mrs, 18 Esk pi 
Blaikie, George, fireman, 190 High st 
Blair, x\lex. , mason, Monteith's cl 
Blair, James, brushmaker, 8 Mitchell st 
Blake, David, baker, 37 High st ^ 

Blake, Mrs, seamstress, Bellybught cott 
Blanshard, Miss, 2 Eskbank ter 
Borland, J.^ labourer, Plummer's cl 
Borthwick, Abner, smith, Whitehill m. 

Borthwick, Jos., joiner, Newmills W 

Borthwick, Mrs, Wilson's close east 
Borthwick, Wm. , Plummer's cl 
Bourhi 1, Wm. , ropemaker, Leyden's cl 
Bowers, Jas., contractor, Lothian road 
Bowes, Misses, Maryville, Dalhousie rd 
Boyd, Mrs, 5 Lothian bk 
Boyd, William, labourer, Tait st 
Boyd, Thomas, carter. Loan 
Boyd, William, labourer, Newfarm 
Bourhill, Wm. , bootmaker, 3 Eskdaill st 
Brady, Col.-Sgt, drill instructor, D.R.V. 

5 Mitchell st 
Braid, John, fancy warehouseman and 

newsagent, 3 High st ; house Parkside 

place 
Braid, Robert, forester, Dalkeith park 
Braid, Wm., postman, 88 High st 
Bradford, John, painter, Pursell's cl 
Briggs, Mrs, High school d 
Briggs, Thomas, weaver, 31 Westfield cot V 
Brannigan, Peter, painter, Bridgend 

BRODIE, JOHN, Cross Keys Hotel, 

144 High st — see advt 
Brodie, William, plumber, Buccleuch st 
Broomfield, David, Laurelbank, Eskbank 
Brotherstone, Jn. , miller, Dalkeith mills 
Brown, Andrew, 17 Esk pi 

BROWN, C. K., & SONS, grocers & spirit 

merchants, i Eskdaill st — see advt. 
Brown, David, fruiterer, no High street; 
Brown, Geo, insurancesupt, 7 Muirpark pi 
Brown, James, draper, y] High st ; 

house 21 Mitchell st 
Brown, James, porter, 19 Westfield park 
Brown, Jas., publican, 170 High st 
Brown, Robert, agent, Lothians' Miners, 

37 Muirpark 
Brown, Mrs, Wilson's close west 
Brown, John, weaver, 27 Westfield cot 
Brown, John, compositor, 15 High st 



Dalkeith 



Brown, Robert, gardener, Lugton 
Brown, Miss, Wheat Sheaf inn, 8i Back: 
Brown, William, tailor 3 Westrield park 
Brown, Wm. & Chas. , farmers, Newton 
Bruce, Mrs, Lothian rd 
Bruce, And., porter, 113 High st 

^ Bruce, Jas. S., fancy dealer, 44 High st 

^ Bruce, Wm., dairyman, 16 Back st 
Brunton, Mrs Ann, Milers cl 
BRUNTON, JAMES, Harrow hotel- 
see advt 

H Bryce, Jas., miner, Wilson's cl E. 

W Bryson, A., Edinburgh carrier, Parkside pi 
Bryson, James, watchmaker, 65 High st 
Bryson, John, carter, 48 Back st 
BRYSON & SONS, watchmakers and 

jewellers 65 High st — see advt 
Bryson, John, (B. & Sons), Woodstock 
Buccleuch and Queensberry the Duke of, 

Dalkeith house 
Buchan, A,, & Co., grocers, 30 Eligh st 
Buchan, Mrs, Relief pi 
Buchan, John, grocer, Rosetta, Waverleyrd 
BUCHAN, N.&J, Buccleuch Temperance 

Hotel, 41 High st — see advt 
BUCHAN. WM., auctioneer. North wynd 

— see advt 
Buncle, John, ropemaker, Duncraig 
Buncle, Thos. A., Woodbine 
BUNCLE, BETER, rope, twine, and net 

manufacturer, Elmfield pi— see advt 
Bunyan, M., Campbell's cl 

[P Burnett, J., factory overseer, 35 Muirpark 
Burnett, Alex., Lothian st 
Burnett, Wm., 5 Stewart's cott's 
Burns, Robt. , Buccleuch st 
Burnside, Wm., 12 Westfield pk 
Burrell, Miss E. , dressmaker, 30 South st ; 
Byers, Thomas, labourer, Scott's cl 
Byers, Wm. , cropper, Wesley cot 



Cairnie, John, heckler, 40 Back st 
Cairnie, Thos., ropespinner, 10 Relief pi 
Cairney, R., Eskdaill st 
Cairns, Mrs, 3 Eskdaill st 
Calder, John, Vint's cl 
Calder, Miss Annie, Fairhaven 
Calder, Peter, tailor. Miller's cl 
Calder, William, tailor, Lothian st 
Callender, John, Newbattle collieries 
Cameron, Miss, Rosetta, Waverley rd 
Cameron, William, Tait st 
Campbell, Geo., guard, Buccleuch st 



'-nmpbe'.l, .\., caljinetmaker, White's cl, e 
CA.M-'J£LL, D. & J., dairymen etc, 83 

jJack sr — sec advt 
Campbell, Don., engineman, 119 High st 
Campbell, John, painter. Wicket 
Campbell, Wm., Victoria lodging-house 

keeper, 22 Eskdaill st 
Carlyle, Mrs, fancy warehouse, 99 High st 
CARMENT, JOHN, bookseller,- news- 
agent, stationer, printer, Hbrarian, ship- 
ping agent, and publisher of Carineufs 
Directory, 67Highstj house Melville- 
terrace — see advts. 
Carrick, Rev. John C, B.D., Newbattle 
Carson, Robt., draper, Newtongrange 
Cassie, James Scott, 30 Muirpark 
Cathie, John, coachpainter, Croft St 
Cathie, Robert, 47 Muirpark 
Cathie, Thos., coachman, Eskbauk lodge 
Cavanagh, James, 3 Esk pi 
Cessford, Wm. , vannian, 15 Back st 
Chalmers, C, shoemaker, Tait st 
Chalmers, Mrs, 113 High st 
CHALMERS, T. S., painter, 160 High st 

and Tait st — see advt 
Chapman, Robt., engineman, Cowdenfoot 
Chisholm, Alex., 4 Back st 
CI-HSHOLM, A., & SON, joiners. Elm- 
field pi ; house 1 1 High st— see advt 
Chisholm, Miss, 43 Back st 
Chisholm, John C. (Anderson & Chis. ), 
Bk of Scot; ho Avenue villa, Eskbank 
Chouler, Chris. , keeper, Dalkeith pk 
Christie, Miss, 37 Westfield cotts 
Christie, James, printer, 42a Back st 
Clark, James, corkcutter, Tolbooth cl 
Clark, Thos., miner, 17 Croft st 
Clark, Jas, (Glenesk colliery) Westbourne 
Clark, John, 6 Mitchell st 
Clark, Michael, labourer, Pettigrew's cl 
Clark, Robt., brewer, 58^ High st 
Clark, Mrs, spirit merchant, 136 High st 
Clark, Wm. , surfaceman. Croft st 
Cleghorn, T., timekeeper, 23 Westfield pk 
Clydesdale Bank, Limited, 86 High si ; 

John Craig, agent 
Clyne, Mrs, North Wynd 
COCHRANE, ANDW., grocer and wine 

merchant, 17 South st — see advt 
COCHRANE. COLIN, painter, 16 South 

st; house, 16 Abbey rd, — see advt. 
Cochrane, William, painter, 4 Back st 
Cockburn, And., shoemaker, Tolbooth cl 
Cockburn, A. W., C.E., Parkend ho 
Cockburn, Philip, 43 Back st 



18 



Dalkeith 



Coleman, John, labourer, Parkside pi 
Coleman, Thos., weaver, Parkside pi 
Cole, H. , weaver, 4 Jane pi 
Collier, Francis, blacksmith, Millerhill 
Colvin, Wm., weaver, 14 Back st 
Colvin, David, Brunton's cl 
Colquhon, J., currier, Crcft st 
Combe, D., bootmaker, 123 High st 
Commercial Bank of Scotland, Limited 

118 High st; James Gray, agent 
Comrie, Mrs, 9 Lothian bk 
Conlon, Thos,, labourer, Robertson's cl 
Connell, Wm., fireman, 9 Jane pi 
Connolly, James, labourer, Buccleuch st 
Connolly, John, surfaceman, 46 Back st 
Connolly. M., enginedriver, y] Back st 
Connolly, Patrick, roadman, Parkfoot 
Co-Operative Store Co., Elmfield pi 
Copland, Mrs, Buccleuch st 
COPLAND, JOHN, tinsmith, Lothian st 

— see advt 
Cordery, Geo., bricklayer, Eskdaill st 
Cornwall, Andw. , moulder, Vint's cl 
Cornwall, Mrs Thos, dairy, Lothian st 
Cornwall, Thomas, ininer, Lothian br 
Cossar, John, painter, Buccleuch st 
Cotton, George, Clunie 
Coutts, A. M,, clerk, 26 Muirpark 
Coventry, Mrs John, High School cl 
Cowan, Mrs, 9 Lothian bank 
Cowan, Mrs, 18 Abbey road 
Cowan, Mrs Agnes, Newmills 
Cowan, R. , contractor, 1 1 Abbey rd 
COWAN, Miss, china merchant, 35 High 

st — see advt. 
Cowe, Mrs, Gordon's cl, 52 High st 
Cox, Thomas, weaver, 5 Westfield pk 
Craig, Alexander, joiner, Porteous' pi 
Craig, D.,&Sons, ironfounders, Millerhill 
Craig, John, agent, Clydesdale Bank, Ltd., 
Craig, Wm., weaver, Wesley cotts 
Craik, Nicol, station agent, Millerhill 
Craik, Wm., and Sons, watchmakers and 

jewellers, 90 Pligh st 
Craik, Wm., jeweller, 90 High st 
Craik, W., jun., watchmaker, 90 High st 
Craik, Thos. U., forester, London road 
CRANSTON & ALLAN, bootmakers, 

60 High st — see advt. 
Cranston, John, shoemaker, Eskbank road 
Crawford, John, weaver, 61 Westfield cotts 
Crawford, T., cabinetmaker, 21 Esk pi 
Crawford, D., 56 Westfie'd cotts 
Crawford, Mrs John, 32 Westfield cott 
Crawford, Mrs, machinist, White Hart st 



Crichton, Jas., market gardener, 95 Back s 
Crichton, Mrs [ames, Brunton's cl 
Crooks, Mrs, Cowden cleuch 
Crooks, William, mason, Lothian rd 
Crooks, Mrs, Marchbank, Bridgend 
Crouch, H. B., jeweller. Oriel cot 
CRUICKSHANK, JAS., Leith carrier, ^ 

Marchbank — see advt. 
Gumming, Farquhar, tailor. Croft st 
Gumming, R.. jun.. Young's cl 
Gumming, R., labourer, Moffat's cl 
Gumming, Wm., tailor, 14 Back st «ffi| 

Cummings, G. , tailor, Edinburgh rd -^ 

Cummings, Wm., brushmaker, Croft st 
Gumpstie, John, miner, Wardlaws cl 
Cumpstie, R., shoemaker. White's cl E. 
GUMPSTIE, THOMAS, bricklayer and 

furnace builder, Bridgend — see advt. 
Cunningham, Thomas, 12 Glenesk cres 
Curties, Ed. H., designer, I Westfield pi 
Curran, F., bricklayer, Miller's cl 
Currie, Andw., signalman, Hardengreen 
Currie, James, groom, Candlework cl 
Currie, J. , White's close east 
Currie, A., baker, Roberton's cl 
Gurror, John, gardener, Waverley rd 
Cuthbertson, G., weaver, 55 Muirpark 

Dalgettie, Andw., Berrie's ct 
Dalgettie, Ross, fireman, Buccleuch st 
Dalgleish, Alexander, & Son, cork manu- 
facturers, 90 Back st g| 
Dalgleish, A., Moffat's cl '^ 
Dalgleish, Alex. (A. D. & Son), Appin lo. 
Dalgleish, James, corkcutter, 42 Back st 
Dalgleish, John (A. D. & Son), Rowan 

brae, Muirpark pi ^. 

Dalgleish, Miss, 2 Westfield place 
DALGLELSH, P. and L., clothiers, I 

High st — see advt 
Dalgleish, Robt.. corkcutter. 113 High st 
DALGLEISH, WM.,& SON, cork manu- 
facturers, 115 High st — see advt. 
Dalkeith Conservative Association, White 

Hart st — H. Reid, keeper 
Dalkeith Gas-Light Company, Croft st — 

Alex. Bell, manager 
Dalkeith Liberal Association, Tait st 

— William Cameron, keeper 
DALKEITH SAVINGS' BANK, Office, 

55 Back st — see advt. 
DALKEITH SHIPPING & EMIGRA- 
TION OFFICE, 67 Fligh ^t— see advt 
Dalkeith Volunteers — (6th V.B.R.S.) — 
Orderly room, Newmills rd 



Dalkeith 



19 



Darling, Mrs, lo Mitchell st 
Darling, R., Elm lodge 
Davidson, A., mechanic, 25 Westfield pk 
Davidson, Alfred F. , teacher, 63 Muirpart 
DAVIDSON, BROS. , grocers and provi- 
sion merchants, 13 High st — see advt. 
J^ , Davidson, David, Newtongrange 

Davidson, John, house agent, London rd 
Davidson, John, nurseryman, Water tower 
nursery, Eskbank rd; ho, Bridgend. 

• Davidson, John, fireman, Bennett's cl 
Davidson, J., jun. , grocer, I'lorth Esk ho 
Davidson, Mrs, 5 Muirpark 
Davidson, Peter B. , grocer, Ironmills 
Davidson, R. J. , shopman, 6 High st 
Davidson, T. , shoemaker, 40 High st 
Davidson, Wai., East lodge 
Davie, Charles, 7 Jane pi 
Dawson, And., & Co., tanners, curriers 

and leather merchants. Croft st 
Dawson, Mrs Eben., Glenesk, Eskbank 
Dawson, Ebenezer, (A. Dawson & Co.), 

Beech wood, Eskbank 
Dawson, James, & Co., brush manufac- 
turers, 24 High st 
Dawson, J. (J. D. & Co.), Thoinybank 
Dawson, Misses, Thornybank 
Deafly, John, labourer, Brunton's cl 
Deans, J., brushmaker, 5 Relief pi. 
Deans, G. , brushnraker, 89 Back st 
Deans, Jas. , home farm, Dalkeith park 

» Deans, Thos. , banksman, Donaldson's cl 
DEAS, WALTER, fishmonger, 50 High 

st ; house Edinburgh rd — see advt. 
Dempster, x\lex., Charles' court 
Dennis, John, brickbuilder. Park road 
•» Dewar, Alex., shopman, Lothian ter 
Dev/ar, Duncan, forester, Snieaton 

Dick, James, weaver, i Muirpark 
DICK, ROBERT, blacksmith, 28 Pack 

st — see advt 
DICKSON & SON, seedsmen and 

fruiterers, Buccleuch pi — see advt. 
Dickson, Geo., carter. North wynd 
Dickson, George, 90 Back st 
Dickson, Henry, gardener, Gibraltar 
Dickson, Jas., fireman, White's cl east 
Dickson, William S., grocer, 16 High st 

house, 12 do. 
Dickson, Mrs, Tolbooth cl 
Dickson, Mrs R., 28 South st 
Dickson, Mrs, Young's cl 
Dickson, Mrs, 35 Mitchell st 
Dickson, Miss Mary, Buccleuch st 



Dickson, Mrs, 15 Esk pi 

Dickson, Thomas, grocer, Buccleuch pi 

house 31 Mitchell st 
Dickson, Wm., Mary villa, Eskbank rd 
Dixon, Wm. J., Buccleuch st 
Dingwall, James, N.B. Railway, Dalhousie 

Dingwall, Watson, grocer and wine 

merchant, 52 High street ; house 

6 Mitchell st 
Dobbie, J. M'Hutchen, farmer, Campend 
Dobbie, Mrs John, Berrie's court 
Dodds, Miss C. , laundress, Wicket 
Dodds, Mrs, ladies' nurse, Monteith's el 
Dodds, Robert, bootmaker, and sewing 

machine agent, 47 & 85 High st ; 

house Edinburgh rd 
Dods, John, fruiterer 38 South st 
Dods, Archibald, auctioneer and live 

stock salesman, Bridgend 
Dods, James, publican, 43 High st 
Dods, Miss, 30 Westfield cott 
DODDS, R., cabinetmaker, Buccleuch st 

— see advt 
Dodds, Thomas, miner, Croft st 
Dods, Wm. , baker, Edinburgh rd 
Dods, Mrs Wm., Lugton house 
Donachie, E. , plasterer, Eskdaill st 
Donachie, J., hairdresser, Edinburgh rd 
Donaldson, David, Buccleuch st 
Donaldson, James W. , 120 High st 
Doughty, John, com. traveller, Bridgend 
Doughty, J. H., traveller, 1 1 Mitchell st 
Douglas, A., shoemaker, Leyden's cl 
Douglas, Thos, Eskside Llouse 
Douglas, Walter, farmer, Mayfield farm 
Douglas, A. & W., Dalkeith mills 
Douglas, Geo., ironmonger, (G. D. & S.), 

the Birks, Eskbank 
DOUGLAS, GEORGE, & SON, iron- 
mongers and seedsmen, 21 South st 

— see advt. 
Douglas, J., farmer, Northfield, Cousland 
Douglas, Mrs A., Mayfield lodge 
Douglas, Abram, millmdster, Hazelbank ho 

Newbattle rd 
Douglas, John P., Dalkeith mills; houssj 

Millhill, Newbattle 
Dove, Miss, Waverley cottage, Eskbank 
Downie, Neil, currier. Croft st 
Drew, John, grocer, Eskdaill st 
Drone, Mrs H. , Moff"at's cl 
Drummond, Miss, confectioner, 20 Jwne, pi 
Dryden, R., Burgh Surveyor, 90 Back st 
Drysdale, James, labourer, Bridgend 



20 



Dalkeith 



Drysdale, Wm , surfaceman, Hardengreen 
Duncan, Arch., lorryman Lothian st 
DUNCAN, J., & SON, bootmakers, 26 

High st — see, advt 
Duncan, John, grocer, 45 Vv'estfield cotts 
Duncan, Peter (Metcalfe, Duncan & Co.) 

Torsonce liouse, Newbattle rd 
Duncan, Thos., contractor, Newmills rd 
Duncan, T., bootmaker, i Mitchell st 
Duncan, Wm. F., ironmonger, (Metcalfe, 

Duncan and Co) ; house East glebe 
Duncan, J., 25 Mitchell st 
Dunlop, Mrs, White's cl E. 
Dun, Miss, Gilston lodge, Eskbank rd 
Dunn, Malcolm, gardener, Dalkeith pk 
Durie, Mrs Adam, Bridgend 
Dyce, George, gardener, 8 Jane pi 



Easton, Mrs, Lothian st 

Edgar, Mrs, Lothian st 

Edington G. , contractor, North wynd 

Elder, Mrs Chas. C, 35 High st 

Elder, John, painter, Buccleuch st 

Elder, James, overseer, 7 High st 

Ellis, Rev E. S., (Wesleyan Church), 

16 Muirpark 
English, Peter, tailor, Buccleuch st 
Eskbank Feuing Coy. Ltd. , Eskbank 
Ewart, Robt., Thornybank 
Ewart, Wm., carter, Lugton 
Ewing, James, weaver, 58 Westfield cot 
Exelby, Misses, Parkside pi 
Exelby, Wm. T. , moulder, London rd 



Fairbairn, A. miner, Miller's cl 
Fairbairn, James, Roberton's cl 
Fairbairn, Thos., I Jane pi 
Fairweather, R., drysalter, Edinburgh rd 
Fairley, Geo. , 4 Westfield pk 
Falconer, Miss, 23 Mitchell st 
Falconer, J. T., cabinetmaker, Buccleuch st 
Falconer, Miss, Bridgend 
Falconer, T. , shoemaker. White's cl west 
Falconer Richard, Buccleuch st 
FALCONER WILLL\M, & SON, tin- 
smiths, Buccleuch st — see advt 
Farrell, Patrick, miner, Ward'aws cl 
Fairnie, Danie', currier, Bucc euch st 
Eraser, James, 41 Muirpark 
Farquhar, Rev. H. , West Parish manse 
Farrell, Edward, gasman. North wynd 
Ferguson, Wm., painter, 11 High st 
Ferguson, T. J. 7 Lothian bk 



Ferguson, WiUiam. carter, Scott's cl 

Ferguson, John, pub ican, 124 High st 

Fin'ay, George, 27 South st 

Finl^y, V-.'m., butcher, t6S High st 

Finien, i/irs, loi High st 

Firth, John, Miller's cl 

Fleming. Jas., missionary, 32 Muirpark .\^ 

Fletcher, E. R. , Cousland lime works 

Flockhart, John, publican, 21 Back st 

Flockhart, Miss Jane, Wicket 

Forbes, Lispector, Police station 

Foreman, Fred., confectioner and florist w 

sub post-ofl&ce Bankhead, Eskbank 
Foresters' Hall Company (Limited) 
Forrest, James, I High st 
Forrest, Alex., Orwell bank 
Forrester, Ebenezer, grocer. 55 High st ; 

house Abbey rd 
FORSYTH, JAMES, butcher, Elmfield 

pi — see advt 
Forsyth, Wm. butcher, 4 Back st 
Forsyth, Wm., gardener, Buccleuch st 
Forsyth, Mrs Margaret, 6 High st 
Fox, Jas., banksman, Wicket 
Fraer, James, Tait st 
Eraser, James, 41 Muirpark 
Eraser, Mrs, Young's cl 
Eraser, John, insurance agt., l^i Highst 
Fraser, Rev. James, U.P. Manse, Park rd 
Eraser, Mrs, Lothian st 
Fraser-Nichol, Major J. T., Rosegarth 
Frater, Jas., mechanic, 4 Stewart's cotts <» 
Freeland, Mrs, Donaldson's cl 
Freeland, M., weaver, 40 Westfield cotts. 
Frood, Jane, 2 Jane pi 
Fulton, Mrs, Monteith's cl 



Gair, James, forester, 93 Back st 
Gallacher, Peter, hawker, Eskdaill st 
Garvie, Hugh, gardener, Vint's cl 
Garden, James, 24 Muirpark 
Gerrie, Geo. R., bank teller, 118 High st 
Gibson & Mercer, farmers, Southfield 
Gibson, Alex., joiner, Lothian bk 
Gibson, Wm., coach wright, Lothian bk 
Gibson Bro==., joiners, Lothian bank 
Gilbert, Joseph, M., joiner, North Esk 
Gilchrist, Anthony, 16 Westfield pk 
Gi es, James, coal agent, 2 Westfield pi 
Gillan, James, overseer. King's gate 
Gillon, James, hawker, Eskdaill st 



Dalkeith 



21 



GLASS, A. & W., Cycleclom, Buccleuch 

St -see advt. 
Glass, xA.lexander, fireman, Buccleuch st 
Glendinning, W., pack.er, 57 Westfield cot 
Golder, James, weaver, 44 Westfield cott. 
Golder, Mrs, 53 Westfield cott 
Goldie, Geo., Eskdale lodge 
% Goldie, Misscs, Goldie lea. Park rd 
Goodall, P., Moff'at'scl 
Goodall, John, gardener, North Wynd 
Goodfellow, J. 5 brushmaker, 34 South st 
Goodfellow, Misses, Thomson's cl 
P Goodwin, Mrs, 174 High st 

Gordon, Francis, tailor, Newmills rd 
Gordon, W., surfaceman, Buccleuch st 
Gordon, Thomas, labourer, Tait street 
Gorrie, George H. , Bridgend 
GOUGH, ALEX., baker, 176 High st— 

see advt 
Graham, James, Newtongrange 
Graham, J. A., enginekeeper, Bridgend 
Graham, xMrs C. W., 139 High st 
Graham, R., constable, Whitehill 
Graham, Robt., farmer, Dalhousie mains 
Graham, Mrs, Maryville, Dalhousie rd 
Grant, Alex., smith, White's close east 
Grant, Alex. , moulder, Young's close 
Grant, Daniel, miner. White's cl east 
Grant, James, hawker, Watson lane 
Grant, John, baker, 5 South st 
Grant, R., plumber, Newmills rd 
Gray, Ed. G., ironmonger, Willow bank 
IP Gray, George, ironmonger, (G. & Taylor) 
^ Murrayville, Park rd 

Gray, James, agent. Commercial Bank, 118 

High st ; house Dunallan, Eskbank 
Gray, Jas. P., bank accountant, Dunallan 
■* Gray, James, corkcutter, Eskdaill st 
Gray, James L., Elginhaugh 
Gray, John, corn merchant, Elginhaugh 
Gray, Joseph, di-aper and outfitter, 72 and 

74 High st 
Gray, Mrs Alexander, Lothian bank 
Gray, Rev. Andrew, D.D., the manse, 

Edinburgh rd 
Gray, Robert, signalman, Thornybank 
Gray & Handyside, S.S.C., 118 High st 
Ciray, WilHam, tailor, 23 Esk pi 
Gray & Taylor, ironmongers and seed 

merchants. 73 High st 
GRAY, WILLI AiM C., grocer, 4 High st; 

house Maybank, JM'park pi — see advt. 
Gray, Wm., engineer, Buccleuch st 
Greig, Mrs, 13 Muirparl 



Greig, Thomas B. , Ancrum rd, Eskbank 
GRIEVE, DAVID, grocer and provision 

merchant, Buccleuch pi — see advt. 
Grieve, George, & Son, slaters, 32 Back st 
Grierson, Charles, smith, 6 Muirpark pi 
Grossert, Adam, smith, Millerhill 
Grossart, James, blacksmith. Croft st 
Guild, Charles, organist, Melville villas 
Gulland, Wm., miner, Monteith's cl 
Gunn, J., jobbing gardener, 5 South st 
Guthrie, Mrs, 6 Abbey rd 



Hadden, Adam, Whitehill 
Haggart, David, agent, London rd 
Haig, Brothers, grocers, 106 High st 
Haig, Andrew, ropemaker, 133 High st 
Haig, A. W., joiner, Buccleuch st 
Haig, William, gardener, Lothian st 
HAIG, J., & SONS, funeral undertakers, 

Croft st — see advt 
Haig, M. & J., fish and egg merchants, 

38 High st and 47 Back st 
Hair, Stephen, builder. White Plart st ; 

house, Brewlands house 
Haldane, John, Langside 
Hall, James, miner, Wardlaw's cl 
Halliday, Francis, Moffat's cl 
Hamilton, J. D., barber, Eskdaill st 
HAMILTON, JOHN, butcher, Buccleuch 

pi; house 17 Abbey rd — see advt. 
Hamilton, Joseph, draper, Buccleuch pi 
Hamilton, Mrs James, Porteous' pi 
Hamilton, Mrs, 79 Back st 
Hamilton, Mrs, Wicket 
Hamilton, James, 113 High st 
Hamilton, J., weaver, 60 Westfield cot 
Hamilton, James, jr., 41 Westfield cot 
Handasyde, C. H. & Co., oil refiners, 

Dean Works, Newbattle 
Handasyde, C. H., Craigesk 
Handyside, Robt. (G. & PL), Melville villas 
Hannan, Geo., brushmaker, 93 Back st 
Ilannan, James, Kippilaw 
Hannan, Miss, Lugton 
Hannah, J., brushmaker, High School cl. 
Hanton, John, engineer. White Hart st 
Hanton, Thomas, soHcitor, White Hart st 
Happer, W.R.. insur. agt., Stewart's cotts 
Hardie, Rev. Alexander, M.A., Free 

Church manse, Newtongrange 
Hare, Mrs George, 145 High st 
Hare, John, pattern maker, 4 Esk pi 



Grennan, Patrick, engineman, Buccleuch stllar^, James, joiner, Tait st 



22 



fe 



Dalkeith 



Hare, Wm., brushmaker, 28 Back st 
Harper, Wm., farmer, vSheriffhall mains 
Harper, And., tailor, Moffat's cl 
Hart, Alexander, plumber and gasfitter, 

22 South St; house "White Hart st 
Hart, Alexander, (Mitchell Bros.) 77 

High st 
Harrison, Wm., cabman, Buccleuch st 
Hastie, Andrew, Whitehill 
Hastie, George, cabman, Buccleuch st 
Hastie, Wm., currier, I Relief pi 

Hay, Mrs John, High school cl 
Hay, Thomas, 12 Muirpaik pi 

Head, Rev. Joseph, St David's C.C. 
Hedley, J. T., 2 Muirpark 

Henderson, Mrs John. Newbattle 
Henderson, Alex., pubhcan, Newtongrangf 
Henderson, Robert, butcher,86 High streei 
Henderson, Robert, tailor, 26 High st 
PTenderson, W. J, shipbroker, Craigesk 
Henderson, Mrs, Bridgend 
Henderson. Mrs, 4 Muirpark pi 
Henderson, Wm., Bridgend 
Henry, Thomas R., tailor, 128 High st 
Henny, Thomas, labourer, Gordon's cl 
Herron, S., weaver, 6 Westneld park 
Hewat, Miss, Westfield house 
Hewat, Thomas D., Westfield house 

Hill, Wm., gardener, Wardlaw's cl 

Hill, Wm., plasterer. Young's cl 

Hill, Wm., jun.. Young's cl 

Hindes, Miss, 21 High st 

HISLOP, R. & A., coach hirers, Justinlees 

stables, Eskbank — sec aclvt. 
Hislop Robt., cabman, Islay cot 
Hislop, Alexander, Justinlees 
Hobday, Mrs, Glebe bank cott 
Hodge, Mrs, Brunton's cl 
Hodgson, John W., clerk, Bellevue pi 
Hood, J., hawker, 34 South st 
Hogg, Jas., potato merchant, Buccleuch pi 

house Croft st 
Hogg, MrsWm., Laurel villa. Glebe 
Hogg, Mrs C., Croft st 
Hogg, Mrs, Hunt cl 
Hogg, Robert, joiner, Edinburgh road; 

house Buccleuch st. 
Hogg, Wm., smith, Wilson's cl, east 
Home of Rest, Fairfield ho 
Hook, John, carter 128 High st 
Hope, John jr., Glebe bank ' 



Hope, Archd., vanman, 14 Back st 
Hope, Robert, mason, London rd 
Hope, Mrs Ann, W^ilson's land 
HOPE, J., & SON, brassfounders, North 

wynd ; — see advt. 
Hope, John, sen.. Glebe bank 
Hope, Thos, bras^.finisher. Tabernacle cl 
Hope, John, keeper, Foresters' hall. Buc- | 

cleuch st 
Horsburgh, Mrs G., 7 Muirpark 
Horsburgh, Peter, Edinburgh rd 
Howden, John, Croft st - 

Howieson, Jas., smith, Jane pi ■ 

Howieson, J., miner, 10 Jane pi " 

Hoy, Mrs, Donaldson's cl 
Hoy, W., moulder, Plummer's cl 
Hume, Mrs, Tait st 
Hume, Robert, labourer, Newmills rd 
Hume, James, saddler, 1 1 South st 
Flunter, David, shoemaker, Eskdaill st 
Hunter, E. & A., farmers, Longthorn 
Hunter, Rev. Andrew, M.A., B.D., 

Hollybush, Park rd 
Hunter, John, vanman, 14 Back st 
Hunter, Peter, hawker, Watson's lane 
Hunter, Wm. , labourer. Young's cl 
HUNTER, WILLIAM, & Co., clothiers 

and outfitters, 83 High st — sec aiivt 
Hutchison, C. B. , registrar, &c., l\ii!lerhi!l 
Hutchison, John, dairyman, Westlands 
Hutchison, Mrs A., Buccleuch st 
Hutchison, Robert, Elliot's cl 
Hutchison, I., plumber, 79 Back st J 

Hutchison. James, waiter, Lothian st 
Hutton, Ebenezer, porter, Elmfield pi 
Hutton, Geo. R. , governor. Combination 

Poorhouse — Eskbank 



Inch, Miss, Sheriff hall 
Inglis, Andrew, baker, Wicket 
Inglis, Mrs, teacher, Newtongrange 
Inglis, James, law clerk, Sheriff hall 
Inglis, P., clerk of works, Thornybank 
Inclis, Mrs, Eskdale lo 
I. ^b. G. T. Hall, loi High st 
Irvine, Alex., tinsmith, Lolhan st 
Irvine, J., moulder. 13T High st 
T'-vine, [ames, weaver, 48 Westfield cot 
Irvine, I)., gardener, Buccleuch st 
Isbister, Wm., builder, Glenesk cres 



Dalkeith 



n 



Ireland, Mrs, pawnbroker, Eskdaill st ; 
house Janefield cot, Back st 



Jack, Alexander, baker, Wardlaw's cl 

ll Jack, D., smith, i6 Jane pi 

Jack, George, solicitor, Fairfield pi ; 

house, Hazelbank villa 
Jack, John, check-clerk, 3 Whitehill 
Jack, Mrs John, 18 High st 

% Jack, Mrs David, ladies' nurse, Millerhill 
Jack, Mrs, 19 South st 
Jack, Miss Ann, Dalhousie rd 
Jack, Robert C, grocer, etc., Whitehill 
Jamieson, John, currier, 13 Abbey rd 
Jamieson, John, jr., currier, 27 Mitchell st 
jamieson, John, platelayer, 43 Muirpark 
Jamieson, John, joiner, Langside 
jamieson, Wm., joiner, Whitehill 
Jerome, Mrs, Buccleuch st 
Johnston, Jas., miller, Lothian rd 
Johnston, Wm., forester, Newbattle 
Johnstone, A., miner, Roberton's cl 
Johnstone, A., tobacconist, 103^ High st 
Johnstone, G., joiner. Croft st 
Johnstone, H., shoemaker, Aitken's cl 
Johnstone, R., publican, 117 High st 
Johnston, Thos., labourer, 90 Back st 
Johnstone, John, dairyman, Millerhill 
Johnstone, Mrs R., London rd 

p Johnstone, R. G. , Porteous' cl 

JoUie, Wm,, brushmaker, Buccleuch st 
Tones, H. J., Oaklands, Dalhousie rd 
Jones, Walter James, inspector of poor 
and registrar. White hart st ; house 

•• Ancrum rd 



Kay, Peter, Newtongrange. 

KEDDIE, MRS., confectioner, green- 
grocer, etc. , 36 South st — see advt. 

Kean, John, miner. White's cl east 

Keith, Archibald, baker, 14 Back st 

Kellock, Miss, 21 High st 

Kennaway, David, baker, i Back st cotts 

Kemp, Misses, Lothian st 

Kemp, Wm., chemist and druggist, 9, 34A 
and 94 High st 

Kemp, William, baker, 29 High st; house 
6 Glenesk cres 



KEMP, THOMAS, commercial and 
general printer, binder, advertising 
contractor, etc., 100 High street; 
house Ellonville, Park road — see 
advts. 
Kemp, Mrs R. , Ellonville, Eskbank 
Kennawav, Robert, Lothian rd 
Kennaway, Thomas, gardener, Scott's cl 
Kennedy, D., agent, N.B.R., Hardengreen 

house Eskbank station 
Kennedy, Jas. , weaver, 49 Westfield cotts 
Kennedy, Robert, groom, 136 High st 
Kennedy, R., weaver, 35 Westfield cot 
Kennedy, John, moulder, Eskdaill st 
Kennedy, Thomas, gardener, Scott's cl 
Kenneth, C., dairyman, Dalhousie rd 
Kennedy, M., hawker, 13 Jane pi 
Keppie, P. A. , traveller, 8 Glenesk cres 
Kerr, Jas. , engineer. Croft st 
Kerr, Mrs, china dealer, 158 High st 
Kerr, Lord R., Woodburn house 
Kerr, Roderick, agent, Hawthornbank 
Kerr, Thomas, sawyer, Wardlaw's cl 
Kerr, William, keeper. New Cemetery 
Kidd, John R. , clerk, Bellevue pi 
Killingbeck, Morgan, designer, 20 M'park 
Kilgour, Miss, Loanda lodge, Torsonce rd 
King, Douglas, miner, Lothian st 
King, Francis, shoemaker. Relief pi 
King, Francis, weaver, 10 Westfield pk 
King, James, clerk, i Jane pi 
King, George, grocer, Millerhill 
King, Wm., Lothian rd 
King, Robert, farmer, Newtongrange 
Kinnaird, William, butcher, 154 High st 
Kirk, John, pigfeeder, Wardlaw's cl 
Kirkcaldy, J. J., shopman, 156 High st 
Kirkcaldy, David, 'bus driver, 176 Back st 
Kirkcaldy, John, 22 Muirpark 
Kirkman, J. P., clerk, 13 Mitchell st 
Kinnear, James, moulder, Bridgend 
Kirkwood, Mrs, Lothian bridge 
Kirkwood, W. H., smith, Lothian bridge 
Knox, Robert, 28 Westfield cotts 



Laidlaw, W., miner, Lothian st 
Laidlaw, James, miner, High School cl 
Laidlaw, T., furnaceman, Robertson's cl 
Laing, Mrs M., Rerwick lodge, Eskbank 
Lamb, George, weaver, I Westfield pk 
Lamb, John, shunter, 51 Muirpark 
Lamb, Miss 29 Muirpark 



u 



Dalkeith 



M 



L-amont, Wm, tinsmith, Edinlnirgh rd 

Landers, Mrs, 4 Fairhaven villas 

^auder, E. , gardener, Thornybank 

I auder, Mrs, Newmilb 

Laven, John, Eskdaill st 

Laven, J, lodginghouse-keeper, Eskdaill st 

Law, Henry, tailor, North wynd 

Lawrie, D., waiter, Lothian st 

Lawrie, J., surfaceman, 12 Muirpark 

Lawson, Geo., hammernian, Vint's cl 

Ivawson, Robt, lorryman, King's pk cott 

Lawson, W. , grocer, 104 High st 

Lean, John, carpet beamer, 22 Westfield 

Lean, James, weaver, 18 Jane pi 

Lean, Thomas, weaver, 54 Westfield cotts 

Lee, David, Glebe st 

Lees, John, signalman. Iron mills 

Leishman, Mrs R., Newbattle 

Leitch, James, vanman, 155 High st 

Leitch, Thomas, 146 High st 

Leslie, Mrs, 133 High st 

Liberton, John, Tait st 

LIDDELL, GEORGE, painter, 54 High 

st ; house 59 High st — see advt. 
Liddell, Wm., painter, 108 High st 
Lindores, Mrs, dairy keeper, North wynd 
lindsay, D, Back cl, North wynd 
Lindsay, R. W., 17 Mitchell st 
Lindsay, Jas., cork manufacturer. White's 

cl. east ; house 4 Back st 
Lindsay, Wm., grocer, 17 Mitchell st 
Lindsay, Hugh, Glebe house 
Linkison, John, London rd 
Linkison, Robt., gardener, Cowdenfoot 
Linton, D., weaver. North wynd 
Linton, Andrew, Monteith'scl 
Linton, James, gardener, Eskdaill st 
Linton, William, Eskdaill st 
Little, David, constable, Newtongrange 
Lochhead, Miss C., Bellevue pi 
Lockhari, A., merchant, Newtongiange 
Lockhart, John, mason, Wicket 
Lockhart, Mrs A. , Miller's cl 
Logan, Miss, Watson lane 
Logan, Thomas, manager, brush factory ; 

house East glebe 
London & Newcastle Tea Company, 63 

LTigh st — R. J. Davidson, manager 
Lorimer, Samuel, labourer, Charles' ct 
Loudon, John, lademan, London rd 
Lothian, Alex., 8 Muirpark 
Lothian, Marquis of, Newbattle Abbey 
Lothian Coal Co. (Lmtd.). Newbattle 
Lowrie, John, slater, 20 Westfield ixivk 
Lowrie, James, Farkend house, Eskbank 



Lucas, Mrs Sarah, 3 Eskbank terrace 
Lucas, Robert, M.D., CM., Buccleuch st 
Limisden, Miss E., Brunton's cl 
Lumsden, W., grocer, 4 Muirpark pi 
Lyle, P. & D., booksellers, stationers, and 
printers — 'Advertiser' office, 45High st 
Lyle, Peter J., East Woodbrae 



Maben, Wm., dairyman, 18 Eskdaill st 
M'Aleese, Rev W. M. R., Glebe cot 
M 'Allan, John, 37 High st 
M 'Alpine,' E. F. , baker, 32 South st 
M 'Alpine, Miss, dressmaker, 51 Back st 
M 'Alpine, Mary, grocer, Cousland 
M 'Alpine, INIrs, Ednam cot, Eskbank 
M'Beth, Rev John, B.D., Newton manse 
MCabe, B., coachman, Bridgend 
M'Cabe, M., moulder. Back st cotts 
M'Cabe, George, Bridgend 
M'CALL, J. & G., tobacconists, 62 Fligh 

st — ■^ee adv'. 
M'Call, Thomas, dairyman, London rd 
M'CARTER, WM., slater, London road 

— see advt 
M'Carthy, D., labourer, Young's cl 
M'Cready. J., insurance supt., 12 M'ch'l.st 
M'Coll, Bernard, bootmaker, 109 High st 
M'Connell, Miss, 9 Mitchell st 
M'Culloch, Mrs Robert, Brunton's cl 
Macdonald, Alex., Newbattle gardens 
M 'Donald, A., factory worker, 10 Muirpk 
M 'Donald, Alex., smith, 34Westfield colls 
M'Donald, Wm., ixlinburgh rd 
M 'Donald, John, butcher, Newtongrange 
M'Donald, M., dairy, 106 Fligh st 
M'Donald, Mrs, refreshments, 114 Fligh st 
M'Donald, R., carpenter, Lugton lodge 
M'Donald, Wm., miller, Dalkeith mills 
M'Donald, James, miner, Watson lane 
M'Donald, A., weaver, 46 Westfield cott 
M'DOUCAL, GEO., clothier, 31 High 

st — sec advt 
M'DOUCAL, MISSES I. & R., Berlin 

wool and fancy warehouse, 21 High 

st; house 33 Mitchell st — see advt 
M'Dougal, James, plumber, 60 Fligh st 
M'Elroy, Miss, dressmaker, Buccleuch st 
rvI'Farlane, Jdva, teacher, Newton school 
M'Farlane, John, miller, Lothian bank 
Maciarlane, Miss, Collessie bank 



Dalkeith 



M'Farlane, W. , ropemaker, 91 High st 
M'Gill, William, High School cl 
M'Gill, Wm. John, 9 Esk pi 
M'Gillivary, J., weaver. High school cl 
M'Gowan, Mrs, Parkside pi 
M'Gregor, John, tailor, Newtongrange 
M'Gregor, Miss, 4 Westfield pi 

\ M'Guire, Thos., moulder, Plummers cl 
M'Hardie, Patrick M., 18 Mnirpark 
Macintosh, John W., M.R.C.V.S., Lang- 
land's lodge, Eskbank 

^ M'Intosh, Mrs, 109 High st 

W M'lvor, J., china merchant, 42 High st 
M'lVOR, J., boot repairer, Edinburgh rd 

—see advt 
M'Kay, Daniel, smith, 77 Back st 
M'Kay, John, weaver. Croft st 
M'Kay, George, brushmaker, 6 High st 
M'Kellar, George, moulder, 15 Mitchell st 
M'Kemmie, J., brushmaker, 39 Back st 
M'Kenzie, Mrs, 6 High st 
M'Kenzie, Mrs, 131 High st 
Mack, Rich., carter, Wilson's land 
Mackie, Robt., 33 Muirpark 
M'Kinlay, James, tailor and clothier, 102 

High st 
M'Kinlay, Mrs, 43 Mitchell st 
M'Kinlay, Mrs, 14 High st 
M'Kinlay, John, tailor, 24 Esk pi 
M'Kinlay, Mrs, High school cl 
M'Kinlay, Miss, newsagent, 3 South st 
M'Lachlan, D., blacksmith, Thornybank 

1^ M'Lachlan, John, 12 Eskdaill st 

Maclachlan, Rev. Neil D., E.D., Free 
Church manse, Eskbank rd 

M'Laren, D. P., brushmaker, Edinburgh rd 
** M'Laren, Tfis., bootcloser, White's cl. W 
M'Laren, 'Mrs, Young's cl 
M'Laren, Rol)t., baker, Newtongrange 
M'Laren, James, painter, Thornybank 
M'Laren, T. coal grieve, Shaw's cottage 
M'Laren, Wm. brushmaker, 7 Lligh st 
M'Lean, Rev. H., 17 Muirpark 
M'Lean, E. , weaver, Beliybught 
M'Leod, J., and Son, brickbuilders, 14 

Muirpark 
M'LEOD, W., baker, 39 High st; house 

Edinburgh rd—see advt 
M'Lehan, J., maltsman, Vv'hite Hart st 
M'Lennan, James (M. & U.), Orford ho 
M'Lennan & Urquhart, Dalkeith biewery 
M'Leod, Miss, Buccleuch st 
M'Leod, Miss, Janeville, Park rd 
M'Leishj Alex., grieve, Smeaton 



M'Luskie, Patrick, dairyman, Lothian st 
M'Millan, And., flesher, 27 South st 
M'Morran, R., 46 Westfield cotts 
M'Murtrie, Mrs, Glebe st 
M'Neill, D., clerk, 39 Muirpark 
M'Nair, Mrs, grocer, Millerhill 
M'Namara, Patrick, carter, Dalkeith mills 
Maconochie, John, porter, 42 Back s!; 
M'Pherson,R., 67 Muirpark 
M'Pherson, Jane L., post office, 100 High st 
Ml 'Queen, G. , church officer. Free Church 
M'Queen, J., grocer, Buccleuch st 
M'Rae, Omar, miner, Watson lane 
M'Rae, Robert, miner, Edinburgh rd 
M'Ritchie, Mrs. 36 Back st 
M ' Whirter, Jas, N . B. R. Glenesk 



Main, Wm. , agent Royal bank 
Malloy, Jas., Jrligh school cl 
Madden, P., Croft st 
Marshall, P., teacher, 2 (jlenesk cres 
Martin, John, baker, 48 High st 
Martin, John, Scott's cl 
Mason, Thomas, c erk, Lothian bank 
Mathieson, Miss E. , 28 Back st 
Mathieson, D. , weaver, 7 Westfield park 
Matthews, Mrs Richard, 133 High st 
Matthewson, Mrs, Ellangowan, Eskbank 
Menzies, Mrs, i Westfield park 
Meek, Alex., miner, Wilson's cl, west 
Meek, Mrs W., Buccleuch st 
Melrose, Geo., weaver, 18 Jane pi 
Mercer, James, Southfield, Cousland 
Merrie, P. C, Cousland school 
Messer, Wm., dairyman, Newtongrange 
Metcalfe, Duncan, & Co., ironmongers 

and seedsmen, 59 and 61 High st, 
MIDDLEMASS, WM. S., clothier, 67 

High st — see advt 
MILLER, RT., watchmaker, 20 High st 

• — see advt 
Millar, Mrs., 29 Westfield cottages 
Millar, -Wm., bank agent, 69 High st ; 

house Ivy lodge, Eskbank 
Miller, Miss, 38 Westfield cottages 
Miller, John, grieve. Iron mill 
Miller, Geo., bootmaker, Newtongrange 
Miller, Robt., weaver, 55 Westfield cot 
Milne, R. G., Brunton's cl 
Milne, John, grocer, 23 and 25 South st 
Mitch ell Brothers, grocers and wine mer- 
chants, 77 High st 



26 



M 



Dalkeith 



Mitchell, Mrs, Edinburgh rd 
Mitchell, S., hawker, Roberton's cl 
Mitchell, Peter, boot-maker, l68 High st 
Mitchell, Rev. Robt. D., lo Lothian bk 
Mitchell, W., gatekeeper, Dalkeith park 
Moffat, Andrew, miner, 109 High st 
Moffat, Jas., 49 Mairpark 
Moffat, James, baker, 27 Muirpark 
Moffat, J., miner, Newtongrange 
Moffat, T-5 & Co., bakers, 3 Muirpark pi 
Moftat, William, 22 Mitchell st 
Moffat, Wm., Wardlaw's cl 
Moffat, James, miner, Whitehill 
Moffat, John, brushmaker, Vint's cl 
Moir, James, currier, Croft st 
Montgomery, G. , Wellington ho. , Newton 
Monteith, Robert, fish merchant, Tait st 
Monteith, Wm. mason, 61 Muirpark 
Montgomery, J., corkcutter, Back st cotts 
Montgomery, A. , corkcutter, 20 Esk pi 
Montgomery, Jas. R., spirit merchant, 113 

High st 
Montgomery, T., 20 Mitchell st 
Moore, Charles, corkcutter, Scott's cl 
Morrison, John, 5 South st 
Morrison, Lewis, miner, Amos' cl 
Morrison, Mis 5, dressmaker, Parkside pi 
Morrison, Mrs, 26 Westfield cottages 
MORRISON, C, china merchant, 64 

High st — see add 
IMorrison, A. J., miner, Pluramer's cl 
Morton, Mrs W. , 5 South st 
Mouatt, Jas., maltsman, 32 Back st 
Moyes, Jas., irongrinder, Tolbooth cl 
Muir, Mrs., 33 Westfield cotts. 
Muir, John, 21 Wertfield park 
Muir, Peter, vanman, Newmills rd 
Muirhead, John, builder, Mitchell st 
Muirhead, Mrs 5 Abbey rd 
Muirhead, Mrs D., 8 Muirpark pi 
Mulheron, Mrs C, Eskdaill st 
Munro, Joseph, agent, 190 High st 
MUNRO, JAMES, coal merchant, Esk- 
daill st — ^ee advt 
Munro, John, moulder, Eskdaill st 
Munro, Misses, Newtongrange 
Munro, R. G., Tait st 
Munro, W. K., photographer, Westland 
Murdoch, J. N., c'uthier, Buccleuch pi 
Murdoch, John, (Geo. Douglas & Son) 

Rosemount, Parle rd 
Murdoch, Robert, clothier, etc., 25 High st 
Murdoch, Mrs, 45 Muirpark 
Murphy, D., sweep, High School cl 
Murray, Alex., Wellington cot, Millerhill 



Murray, Jas., accountant, 39 Mitchell st 
Murray, Wm. , grieve. Wester Cowden 
Mushet, Mrs Robert, Glenarch house 



Nairne, John, painter, Parkside pi 

Naismith, Wm., publican, 37 Mitchell st ^ 

Nasmyth, David W., wine and spirit mer- H 

chant, White's close east, 86 High st 
Nasmyth, John, draper, 24 South st 
National Bank of Scotland, Limited ; 

69 High st — W. Millar, agent , 

National Telephone Company, Limited, W 

call office, 90 High st 
Naylor, Jas., coach painter, Back st cot 
Naysmith, James, checker, Bridgend 
Naysmith, J., confectioner, 150 High st 
Nei ands, Aiex., slater, Elmfield place 
Neilands, J. S., brushmaker, Pursell's cl 
Neilson, l3aniel, gardener, Smeatonhead 
Neilson, Jos., weaver, 15 Westfield pk 
NELLL, ALEXANDER, joiner. Back st ; 

house 14 Mitchell st — see advt. 
Neill, Andw. , gardener, Thornybank 
Nelson, fas. & Sons Ltd, butchers, loi 

High st 
Ness, Thos. , grocer, 151 High st 
Nevison, Miss, 28 South st 
Newbigging, Mrs, Glebe bank house 
Newton, Miss, 4 Abbey rd 
Nicholls, J, factory mgr, 4 Eskbank ter 
Nicol, Mrs, Tait st 

Nicoll, Robert, painter, High School cl *> 

Nicol, John, plate layer. White's cl. west 
Nimmo, R., shoemaker, 10 Esk pi 
Nisbet, Andrew, clerk, 7 Abbey rd 
Nisbet, Robert, Thornybank 
Nisbet, John, weaver, Eskdaill st 
Nisbet, F. W., Brewlands 
Nisbet, Mrs George, 38 Back st 
Niven, Thomas, 31 Muirpark 
Noble, John, bottler, Store buildings 
NOBLE, R. J., Justinlees inn; house, 

Annfield, Eskbank — see advt. 
Norman, James, shopman, 14 Jane pi 

O'Brien, Mrs, 32 High st 

O'Brien, C, engineman, Plummer's cl 

O'Connor, James, Eskdaill st 

Oliver, C. , coach saddler, Croft st 

Oliver, S., M.D., Dalhousie rd 

Orr, Edward, 131 High st 

Ormiston, David, checker, 35 Back st 

Ormiston, Eben., contractor, FZasthouses 

Ormiston, R., contractor, Newtongrange 



t)alketth 



tl 



Paris, Walter, draper, 12 South st; house 

Hawthornbank, Mitchell st 
Park, Andrew, shoemaker, Tabernacle cl 
Park, Mrs Wm., II liigh st 
Parr, John, farmer, Lawfield 
Paterson, F. , miner, Tolbooth cl 
Paterson, Jas. C. , merchant (Metcalfe, 

\ Duncan, & Co.), Gowanbrae 

Paterson, James, Glenesk cres. 
Paterson, Mrs, Wicket 
Paterson, Rich. L. , agent Royal bank, house 
Meadowspott 

P Patterson, John C, Westwood, Eskbank 
Paterson, Jas., Glenariff, Dalhousie rd 
Patterson, J. G., C.A., Westwood 
Patterson, Mrs C. M., Hardengreen farm 
Patterson, Thos., farmer, Hardengreen 
Paxton, Thos. A., 15 Abbey rd. 
Paxton, Miss, grocer, etc., Millerhill 
Paxton, J., brushmaker, London rd 
Paxton, Thomas, forester, Newbattle 
Payton, John, designer, Lothian bk 
Peacock, Mrs M. , Buccleuch st 
Pearson, ]Miss, Fairfield house 
Pearson, James, quarryman, Tait st 
Pender, D., shepherd, Newmills lodge 
Pendreigh, Thomas, carter, Thornybank 
PENMAN, JOHN, joiner and cartwright 

Newmills — see advt. 
Pennycuick, Mrs Thos., Abbey rd 
Phillipps, In-edk. P., Bellfield house 
Pirrie, George, wood merchant, Flarden 

H green sawmills ; 21 Muirpark pi 

^ Pirrie, Mrs, Lothian lodge, Dalhousie rd 
Pirrie, Wm. , pointsman, Newfarm 
Plain, Francis, tailor, White's close west 
Plain, George, smith, Bridgend 

"• Pohce Station, Newmills rd— Jn. Forbes, 
inspector; A. M. Christie, sergeant 
Porteous, John, labourer, Wilson's cl w 
Porteous, Geo. W., grocer, 166 High st 
Porteous, John, dairyman, 88 Back st 
Porteous, Mrs D. K., 55 Back st 
PORTEOUS, WILLIAM & THOS., 
drapers and clothiers, 70 High st— 
see advt. 
Porteous, Mrs W., Ellon cott, Park rd 
Porteous, Thomas, draper, (W. and T. P.) 

Holly bush 
Porter, Geo., shopman, Parkside pi 
Post Office, 100 High street 
Potts, Thomas, porter, Lugton 
Potter, Daniel, painter, 3 Mitchell st 
Potter, James, painter. 27 High st 
Potter, Stephen, 27 High st 



Potter, Stephen, jr., painter. Iron mills 

Potter, S, & Son, painters, 23 & 27High st 

Potter, Mrs E., 128 High st 

Potter John, grieve. Wester cowden 

Preacher, Jas. , labourer, Lothian st 

Prentice. James, mason, 38 Back st 

Pretsell, John, tailor, 90 Back st 

Pretsell, Wm., tailor, loi High st 

Prinjjle, Mrs, Lothian rd 

Pringle, Jas., 6 Muirpark 

Pringle, Thomas, 15 Muirpark pi 

Pringle, Thos, plumber, 148 Highst 

Pringle, Miss, 148 High st 

Pringle, T. , roacl surveyor, Lasswade rd 

Proctor, Wm., joiner, Thornybank 

Proctor & Young, drapers, 8 High st 

Proudfoot, A., grieve, Whitehill farm 

Pryde, A., platelayer. Wicket 

Pryde, Brodie, miner, Vint's cl 

Pryde, John, coal merchant. 190 High st 

Pryde, George, mason, Tait st 

Pryde, Miss, i White Flart st 

Pryde, Robert, tailor, Easthouses 

Pryde, Walter, gardener. Croft st 

Pryde, Wm., labourer, Lugton 

Purves, Mrs, Monteith's cl 

Purves, R., dresser, Monteith's cl 

Purves John factory worker. North wynd 

Purves, William, 2 Esk pi 

Purves, James, cork cutter, Croft st 



Raeburn, Miss, Cro!'t st 

Raeburn, Wm., Old Meal Market inn 

Ramsay, Alexander, grieve, Mayfield 

Ramsay, James, ploughman, Dalhousie 

Ramsay, Jn. , clerk of works, Newbattle 

Rawet, Mrs, Fligh School cl 

Reid, Arch, miner, Whitehill 

Reid, James, shoe factor, 4 Back st 

Reid, Geo. P., Plummer's cl 

Reid, Hugh, keeper. Conservative hall 

Reid, Mrs, Eskbank grove 

Reid, Miss M., Lugton 

Reid, James, cooper, Tait st 

Reid, James, labourer, Porteous cl 

Reid, William, butcher, 138 Highst 

Reid, John S., clerk, Langside 

Reid, Miss, Buccleuch st 

Reid, Miss J., Eoberton's cl 

Reid, T. , tailor & clothier, Newtongr'ge 

Reid, Wm., banksman, Benbught cot 

Reilly, Jas, Eskdaill st 

Renton, Mrs A., Dalkeith mills 



Dalkeith 



Renton, John, painter, i6 Esk pi 
Reynolds, M., contractor, Berrie's ct 
Reynolds, P., coachbuilder, Donaldson's cl 
Richards, E. B. , Hobart ho 
Richardson, John, slater, Porteous' pi 
RIDDELL, JOI-IN, cabinetmaker and 
auctioneer, Ehnfield pi; house 53 Back 
St — see advt 
Ritchie, Mrs, drapery and millinery ware- 
house, 15 High St 
Ritchie, Mrs, 90 Back st 
Roache, Thos, Plummer's cl 

Robertson, Alex., guard, 17 Westfield pk 
Robertson, John, 24 Whitehill 
Robertson, John, miller, Lothian st 
Robertson, John, plain and ornamental 

plasterer, Parkside pi 
Robertson, Mrs S., 19 Muir pk 
ROBERTSON,M., millwright, lOiHighst 

house 9 Esk p\- -see advt 
Robertson, Peter, weaver, 43 Westfield cot 
Robertson, T., grocer, Parkside pi 
Robertson, T., surfaceman, 4 Re ief pi 
Robertson, T.,engineman, 36 Westfield cot 
Rodger, Wm. , coal merchant, Lothian rd 
Rodger, Jas. , 6 High st 
Romans, D. P., NewtongJange ho 
Romans, John, C.E., Newtongrange ho 

Ross, Andw., grieve. Wester Cowden 

Ross, Alex., shoemaker, Tolbooth cl 

Ross, David, miner, Thornybank 

Ross, David, lathsplitter, 28 Muirpark 

Ross, D. & J., lathsplitters, Buccleuch st 

Ross, James, lathsplitter, 11 High st 

Ross, John, Edinburgh rd 

Ross, Mrs M., 15 Jane pi 

Ross, Miss, 6 Jane pi 

Ross, Mrs. Tait st 

Ross, W. M., signalman, 9 Muirpark 

Rough, John, confectioner, 57 High st 
Royr 1 Bank of Scotland, 81 High st— R. 

L. Paterson and W. Main, agents 
Runciman, John, coachman, Belmont 
Russell, John, butcher, 56 Westfield cotts 
Russell, Wm., clerk, 8 Back st 
Russell, Wm., weaver, 51 Westfield cotts 
Rutherford, William, & Son, Sauchen- 

side farm 
Rutherford, Thomas, grieve, D'Arcy 
Rutherford, George, grieve, Lingerwood 
Rutherford, Wm., labourer, 40 Back st 
Rutherford, John, grieve, Dalkeith park 



SANDERSON, J., dressmaker, Islay cot 

— see advt 
Samuel, A., engineman, Vv'hitehill 
Samuel, John, forester, 145 Pligh st 
Sanders, Andrew, baker, Leyden's cl 
Sanderson, Wm., Mount Lothian 
Sands, Miss C. , 96 High st 
Sawers, Geo., labourer, Plummer's cl 
Scott, Andw., fireman, 55 High st 
Scott, Arthur, labourer, Eskdaill st 
Scott, B. , engineman. Berries' ct 
Scott, David, porter, Edinburgh road 
Scott, James, joiner, 53 Muirpark 
Scott, James, joiner, Newbattle 
Scott, James, shunter, 5 Jane pi 
Scott, James H., 67 Muirpark 
Scott, John, coachman, Lothian st 
Scott, John, burgh hospital, Newmills 
Scott, Robert, surfaceman, Campbell's cl 
Scott, Mrs Wm. , Wardlaw's cl 
Scott, Miss Agnes, Parkside pi 
Scott, Mrs, 13 Muirpark pi 
Scott, Mrs George, Waverley mills 
Scott, Ninian, porter, 5 Esk pi 
Scott, W. , foreman, 42 Back st 
Scottish Drug Depot, 28 High st 
Scougall, And., miner, Westfield 
Selkirk, Miss, 178 High st 
Sharp, John, mason, Watson lane 
Shearer, James, miner, White Hart st 
Shearer, Mrs James, Lothian st 
Sheddon, Wm., smith, Eskdaill st 
Shepherd, Mrs, 47 Westfield cotis 
Sherlock, Rev P., St David's C.C. 
Sherrin, J. E. , teacher, Bridgend 
Sherrit, John, barber, Eskdaill st 
Shiells, Miss, Eskbank academy, Rosehill 
Shirlaw, Wm., grocer, Newtongrange 
Sim, Mrs, 90 Back st 
Sim, Thomas, jun., porter. Croft st 
Simpson, Alex., greengrocer, Edinburgh rd 
Simpson, Geo., moulder, Peltigrew's cl 
SIMPSON, JAMES, chimney sweeper. 

Young's cl — see advt. 
Simpson, Joseph, teacher, Whitehill 
SIMPSON, R., slater, \z^(>Y{:\^%V-see advt 
Singer Sewing Machine Co., 36 High st 
Sinclair, George, mason, Thornybank 
Sinclair, D. , groom, Wilson's cl west 
Sinclair, Mrs, 53 Back st 
SINCLAIR, GEORGE, cabinetmaker and 

undertaker, 122 High st; house the 

Loan — see advts 
Sinclair, M'Kenzie, hatter, etc., 5 High st 
Sked, Wm. blacksmith Cousland 



Dalkeith 



29 



SKED, GEO., blacksmith, Newmills road 

— see advt. 
Skirving, Mrs Jas. , Lugton 
Skirving, Peter, blacksmith. Relief pi 
Skirving, Peter, gardener, Lugton 
Small, Miss, Croft st 

I Small, Andrew H., baker, 82 High st 
Small, Mrs, White's cl E. 
Small, W., blacksmith, 65 Muirpark 
Smathers, Peter T. , grocer and provision 

^ merchant, 76 High st 

r Smith, A., gardener, Ormisbank cot 
Smith-Dorrien, Rev W., Lugton 
Smith, Mrs James, Buccleuch st 
Smith, Mrs Thornybank 
Smith, Jas., tailor, Bellybught 
Smith, James H., Melville ter 
Smith, John C, cab hirer, Buccleuch st 
Smith, John, tailor, Cumming's land 
Smith, John, contractor, Buccleuch st 
Smith, John, dresser, 42 Westfield cott 
Smith, Matthew, vanman, 117 Highst 
Smith, Wm. , carter, War^llaw's cl 
Smith, W. E., schoolmaster, Parkside pi 
Smith, Wm. , traveller, 69 Muirpark 
Smith, Wm., tobacconist, 89 High st 
Sneddon, Mrs, Buccleuch st 
Sneddon, Wm., miner, Brotherston's cl 
Snodgrass, James, farmer, Bryans 
Snodgrass, M. W., farmer, Langside 
Snow, Mother Mary A. , Park rd 

I SOMERVILLE, A., baker, 108 High st 
— see advt. 
Somerville, James, baker, Porteous' pi 
SOMERVILLE, JAMES, bootmaker, 88 
High st; house Glebe lodge — see advt 
Somerville, Mrs James, Ellicot, Park rd 
Somerville, Mrs, 12 Muirpark pi 
Somerville, Misses, Midfield, Park rd 
Somerville, Robt. , shipowner (G. Gibson 
and Co., Leith), Glencairn, Eskbank 
Sorrie, Chas. L., railway guard, Fairfield 
Spears, A., dairyman, Newbattle farm 
Spears, Andrew, check-clerk, Whitehill 
Spears, Adam, joiner, Porteous' cl 
Spence, James, post runner. North wynd 
St Andrew's Convent, Park rd 
Stagg, Alex., plumber, 6 Esk pi 
Stair, Right Hon. the Earl of, Oxenford 
Stark, James, brushmaker, 58 High st 
Stark, John, carter, Berrie's court 
Steedman, R. , gardener, 5 South st 
STEADMAN, THOMAS, bill-poster, 

50 High st — see advt. 
Steadman, Thos, jun., Roberton's cl 



Steel, Adam, Young's cl 
Steel, George, weaver, 21 Muirpark 
Steel, George, miner, Tolbooth cl 
Steel, Wm. , shoemaker. White's cl east 
Steel, John, coal merchant, 86 Back st 
Steel, Wm., lorryman, 19 South st 

btenhouse, Mrs, Glenarch lodge 
vStenhouse, Mrs, Porteous' pi 
Stenhouse, Mrs, Wicket 
Stenhouse, David, moulder, Wicket 
Stenhouse, Jos. , signalman, 18 Westfield pk 
Stephenson, Thos., painter, Buccleuch st 

Steuart, James A., private secretary to the 

Duke of Buccleuch, 165 Pligh st 
Steven, Wm., currier, Buccleuch st 
Steven, Wm., builder, 19 Muirpark pi 
Stevenson, Jas., cabman, 160 Highst 
Stevenson, Mrs B., Fairfield pi 
Stevenson, Mrs Wm. , 84 Back st 
Stevenson, J., fac. overseer, 23 Muirpark 
Stewart, Adam, currier, Croft st 
Stewart, Charles B. , baker, 34 Pligh st 
Stewart, David, Ancrum road 
Stewart, James, Netherby, Eskbank 
Stewart, Jas. K, 3 Abbey rd 
Stewart, John, ropemaker, 38 Back st 
Stewart, John, butcher, Buccleuch st 
Stewart, Mrs, 6 High st 
Stewart, Mrs, Wicket 
Stewart, Miss, Roberton's cl 
Stewart, Mrs R. A., 116 High st 
Stewart, R., engineman, Cowden 
Stewart, Wm., Irelaud's land 
Stewart, Thomas, grocer, Newtongrange 
Stirling, Mrs J., Buccleuch pi 
Stirling, Jas., gas stoker, Pursell's cl 
Stirhng, Peter, teacher, Newbattle school 
Stirling, Robert, N. P. , Buccleuch pi 
Stobbie, Mrs T., newsagent, 121 High st 
Stoddart, Alex., 45 Muirpark 
Stone, Mrs E., 7 Mitchell st 
Storie, James, coachman, Roberton's cl 
Storie, Geo., Pettigrew's cl 
Storie, Robert, Lascar cott 
Sturrock, A. G., accountant, 8 Abbey rd 
Sturrock, Thos., S.S.C, Municipal build- 
ings ; house Abbeymount, Eskbank 
Sutherland, B. G., Mitchell st 
Sutherland, Miss, nurse, (i?> High st 
Swan, R., shunter, 59 Westfield cotts 
Swanson, George, Berrie's ct 
Swanston, W., moulder, Eskdaill st 
Syme, Wm., i Esk pi 



30 



Dalkeith 



w 



TAIT, JAMES, butcher and poulterer,' 
93 High St; house 19 Mitchell st| 

Tait, Mrs Helen, Tait st ! 

Tait, Mrs, 149 High st \ 

Tait, Wm. , 92 Back st 

Tait, Wm., weaver, 24 Westfield park 

Taylor A. , shoemaker, Newtongrange 

Taylor, John, Brewlands ho 

Taylor, Robt. T. , Woodbrae 

Taylor, Wm. Woodbrae, Park rd 

Taylor, Robert, postman, Lothian st 

Taybr, Mrs, Mitchell st 

Taylor, Thomas, carter, Newmills rd 

Taylor. Thomas, ironmonger (Gray and 

Taylor), Midfield, Park rd 
Telford, George, gardener, 42 Back st 
Telford, Ed., gardener, 63 High st 
TERVET, MISS, dressmaker, 25 Esk 

place — see advt. 
Tervet, Robert, 25 Esk pi 
Thompson, George, painter, Croft st 
Thomson, Alexan.ler, tailor, Iron mill 
Thomson, Alex., agent, Dalkeith station 
Thomson, Adam, draper, Viewcamp 
Thomson, iYndrcw, Watson lane 
Thomson, Mrs, Eskside laundry 
Thomson, A., gardener, Back st cotts 
Thomson, David, manager, Co-Operative 

Store, Store building-, 
Thomson, D. , sen., High st 
Thomson, David, Fernbank 
Thomson G., insurance agent, Bridgend 
Thomson, G. , market gardener, Viewfield 
Thomson, R. , traveller, 9 Abbey rd 
Thomson, John, carter, 59 High st 
Thomson, John, carter, Whitehill 
Thomson, Mrs J., Ancrum road 
Thomson, T., weaver, 29 Westfield cotts 
Thomson, T. , brushmaker, Moffat's cl 
Thomson, John, gardener, Woodburn 
Thomson, Miss, fish mer.,etc. , 32 High st 
Thomson, Miss, Orwell bank, Eskbank 
Thomson, Mrs R. , 3 Stewart's cottages 
Thomson, Mrs, ladies' nurse, Elliot's cl 
Thomson, Thos., grocer, Buccleuch st 
Thomson, Wm. , dairyman, Kennels 
Thomson, Wm., Candlework cl 
Thomson, W. , dairyman, 14 Westfield p'i 
Thomson, W., dresser, 50 Westfield cott 
THOMSON, WM., plumber, gasfitter, 

etc., Buccleuch st — see advt. 
THOMSON, W., silk mercer, draper & 

china merchant, 10-14 High st— ^f^ 

aavt. 



Thorburn, John, joiner, Elliot's cl 
Thorburn, John, plumber, 112 Highst 
Thorburn, Miss Mary, 18 Mitchell st 

THORBURN, WILLIAM, plumber and 
sanitary engineer, 97 High st ; house 
Tower house, Bridgend — see advt. jjp 

Thornburgh, R., brassfinisher, Lothian st 
Tod, J. & J., & Sons, grocers and pro- 
vision merchants, South st 
Tod, Mrs John, Glebebank cott 
Tod, Jas. A., merchant, Ormisbank fl 

Todd, Mrs, 15 South st ^ 

Tod, Wm. , miller. Croft st 
Tod. lienry, coachman, 3 Jane pi 
Todd, Robt., teacher, 8 Lothian bk 
Torrance, Thos. A., farmer, Kippilaw 
Torrance, Plenry, labourer, Eskbank rd 
Traill, Miss, teacher, Easthouses 
Train, Mrs Helen, Westfield chapel 
Tully, James, carter. Miller's cl 
Turnbull, G., gamekeeper, Cowden cott 
TurnbuU, Wm., Eskbank house 
Turnbull, George, 152 High st 
Turnbull, Geo. P., tailor, Wilson's cl w. 
Turner, Jas. , labourer. White's close east 
Tweedie, Mrs Helen, Rosehill, Eskbank 
Tweedie. Thos., draper, Bellevue pi 



Urquhart, Wm., brewer (M'Lennan & U.) 
St Plelen's, Ancrum rd 



Vass, D, , market gardener, 79 Back st 
Veitch, Walter, dresser, 39 Westfield cotts 
Veitch, Peter, labourer, White's cl W. 
Vickers, William, publican, jS High st 



WAGSTAFF, C, dairyman, Newmills 

and Elmfield pi — see advt 
Waddell, David, labourer, Wardlaw's cl 
Walker, James, 11 Muirpark pi 
Walker, Joseph, tailor, iS Highst 
Walker, Miss, Newbattle Abbey gate 
Walkinshaw, R. , smith, 33 Westfield cots 
Wallace, J., market gardener. Back st 
Wallace, John, Smeaton lodge 
Wallace, Mrs R, Elmfield pi 
Wallace, David, Lugton 
WALLACE, THOMAS, photographer & 

frame maker, Eslcbank rd — se^ advt 
Wanless, John, 27 Muirpark 
Warden, Mrs R., Wester Cowden 



Dalkeith 



31 



Warden, Ivie, farmer, Easter Cowden 
Watson, Alex., cattle dealer, Whitehill 
Watson Bros., grocers, etc., 91 High st 
Watson, David, grocer, White Hart st 
Watson, David, painter, 36 Back st 
Watson, Mrs G., ]\Ioffat's cl 
.Watson, Henry, miner, Gordon's cl 
^ Watson, Mrsjas., 17 Muirpark pi 

WATSON, JOHN, butcher, 49 High st ; 

house Whitehill — sec aclvt. 
Watson, John, Porteous' pi 
J WATSON, THOMAS, grocer and dairy- 
man, 2 Mitchell %\.—see aclvt. 
W ATSON,WILLIAM, grocer, Elmfield 
place; house White Hart st — see advt 
Watson, Wm., smith, 8 Westfield park 
Watson, Wm. , Stonefield house, Park rd 
Watt, Andw., 92 High st 
Watt, Geo., carrier, Roherton's cl 
Watt, David, moulder, Bridgend 
Watt, John, painter, Croft st 
Watt, R.., moulder, Eskdaill st 
Weatherstone, John, farmer. Airfield 
Webster, J. R. ,' watchmaker, 31 South st 
West, Andrew, forester, Lugton 
Whitcomb, J., constable, Newtongrange 
White, D., shunter, 11 Muirpark 
White, James, ceilarman, Porteous' pi 
White, Thos., mason, 6 Westfield pk 
White, Mrs John, Scott's cl 
White, Robt. , traveller, Charles ct 
Whitehead, Geo., blacksmith, Cousland 
' Whitehead, John, joiner, 26 Esk pi 

Whitelaw, Archd., grocer, 124 High st ; 

house, Willowbank 
Whitelaw, James, tailor, 31 High st 
I Whitson, Jas., dairyman, 127 High st 
Whyte, J. Curtis, M.D., the Elms 
Whytock, John, Wester Cowden 
Widnell & Stewart, Ltd., Eskbank Carpet 

Works 
Wight, Mrs, White hart st 
Wight, Wm., smith. White's close west; 

house White hart st 
WIGHT, ROBT., & SON, drapers and 
milliners, 2, 4, and 8 South st ; house 
Ormisville, 18 Muirpark pi — see advt 
Wightman, James, baker, 129 High st 
Wightman, John, grocer, 103 High street 

house 131 High st 
Wightman, Erancis, Iron mill 
Wightman, Mrs, 16 Mitchell st 
Wightman, Thos., jun., London rd 
Wightman, Thomas, White's cl east 
Wightman, John, shoemaker, croft st 



WIGHTMAN, JOHN, saddler and har- 
ness maker, 13 South st — sec add. 
Wightman, Wm. S., i Abbey rd 
Williamson, Henry, Eshiel ho., Eskbank rd 
Williamson, W. , Charles' ct 
Wilkie, Robt., coal dealer, 91 High st 
Wilson, Archd., vanman, Lothian st 
Wilson, Chas., groom, Brotherston's cl 
Wilson, Mrs G., 4 Mitchell st 
Wilson, Miss, dressmaker, 15 Muirpark pi. 
Wilson, H., shepherd, Lugton 
Wilson, James, Parkside pi 
Wilson, James, guard, 13 Westfield park 
Wilson, John, brushmaker, 10 Esk pi 
Wilson, John, wheel wright, 17 Back st 
Wilson, Miss S. , Islay cott 
Wilson, Mrs Isabella, 1 1 Esk pi 
Wilson, Mrs R., Croft st 
Wilson, Mrs, High School cl 
Wilson, Mrs, Parkside pi 
Wilson, Mrs, Leyden's cl 
Wilson, Mrs, Charles' court 
Wilson, Miss, baby-linen dealer, Buccleu' st 
Wilson, Robt. , brassfounder. White's cl. E 
Wilson, Thomas, miller, 37 High st 
WILSON & NAIRN, coachbuilders, 3 

Back st — see advt. 
Wilson, T., k son, saddlers, 29 South st 
Wilson, W., farmer, Wellington, Newton 
Wilson, Mrs, i Eskbank ter 
Wilson, R., traveller, Buccleuch st 
Wilson, Wm., grocer, Buccleuch st 
Winton, Geo., waiter, 8 Esk pi 
Winton, T. , agent, Eskbank station 
Wishart, Miss, Thornton, Park rd 
Wood, A., porter, Eskdaill st 
Wood, A., carter, Watson's lane . 
Wood, John, tailor, Roberton's cl 
Wood, Alex., Wilson's cl west 
Wood, J., 17 Muirpark 
Wood, James, shoemaker, 32 PTigh st 
Wood, John, enginedriver, 25 Muirpark 
Woolley, Mrs, Melville villas 
Wright, George, carter, Plummer's cl 
Wright, David, grocer, North wynd 
Wright, John, blacksmith, Thornylmnk 
Wright, S., roadman, Newbattle 
Wyburn, Mrs, 31 High st 
Wylie, Jas., miner, Wardlaw's cl 



YOUNC;, ADAM, blacksmith. Gallows- 
hall — see advt 
Young, Geo., gardener, Glenesk cottage 
Young, Alex., labourer, Tolbooth cl 



32 Y Dalkeith 



Young, James, lo Muirpark pi 
Young, James, bricklayer, Wicket 
Young, J. , bookseller, stationer, and news- 
agent, 58 High St ; house 112 High st 
YOUNG, L., and Son, shoemakers, 7 

South St — see advt 
Young, John, porter, 108 High st 
Young, John, fireman, Donaldson's cl 



Young, Peter, agent. Wicket 
Young, Richard, draper, 71 High st 
Young, Robert, dairyman, Eskdaill st 
Young, Thos. , mason, Thornybank 
Young, W. , rector, (Secy of the Association 

of burgh and parochial schoolmasters 

of Scotland) High school 
Young, Wm. , potato dealer, Lothian rd 



See Pao-e 73 foj- £200 Free Insurance 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Garment's Directory 
£200 Free iDsiirance - See Coupon- 



& 



« 



.^SKBilfK CYCLE DEPOT, 

z> .^ iL« :e^ E ^ 17 H[. 

Agent for - 
'New Howe" "Sunbeam" "Humber" and other well- | 
known makes. 

|!^- Repairs Executed on the Premises by Experienced Workmen. *, 



Fill in Your Name at once. 



:]g>ALKElTH :®USINESS 
^ STREET -J- DIRECTORY. ^ 



HIGH STREET. 

Starting from headoftoion — Odd Nos. on Left 
hand side. 

1 P. & L. Dalgleish, clothiers 

3 John Braid, fancy warehouse 

5 M. Sinclair, hatter 

9 Wm. Kemp, druggist 
13 Davidson Bros., grocers 
15 D. Ritchie, draper 

{Gray's dose West here) 

21 I. & R. M'Dougal, fancy warehouse 

23 S. Potter & Sons, painters 

25 Robt. Murdoch, clothier 

29 Wm. Kemp, baker 

31 Geo. M'Dougal, clothier 

33 Robt. Bishop, grocer 

35 Miss Cowan, china warehouse 

37 James Brown, draper 

{North Wyncl here) 

39 W. M'Leod, baker 

41 N. & J. Buchan, temperance hotel 

43 James Dodds, spirit dealer 

45 P. & D. Lyle, booksellers 

47 Robt. Dodds, bootmaker 



{Monteith's close here) 

49 John Watson, butcher 

51 George Whitson, spirit dealer 



( White's close West here) 

P5 Eb. Forrester, grocer 

57 John Rough j confectioner 



High Street — continued 

{ }f ilsoiih close East here) 

61 Metcalfe, Duncan & Co., ironm'g'rs 

{Elliofs close here) 

63 London and Newcaatle Tea Co. 
65 John Bryson & Sons, v/atchmakers 

{Miller'' s close here) 

67 J Garment, bookseller 
67 W. Middlemass, clothier 
(59 National Bank 

72 Miss Aitken, dressmaker 

73 Gray and Taylor, ironmongers 
77 Mitchell Bros., grocers 

79 Royal Bank 

{Edinburgh road here) 

R. Fair weather, drysalter 
83 Wm. Hunter and Co, clothiers 
85 Robt. Dorlds, bootmaker 
87 G. B. W. Archer, chemist 
89 W. Smith, tobacconist 

( Watson lane here) 

91 Watson Bros, grocers 
£3 James Tait, butcher 
95 Mrs W. R. Aitken, grocer 
97 Wm. Thorburn, plumber 

{Briinton's close here) 

99 James Carlyle, fancy warehouse 
M. Robertson, millwright 
101 James Nelson & Sons, Ltd. 
103 John Wightman, grocer 
103i A. Johnstone, tobacconist 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



RICHARD DODDS, 

Cabinet Maker, Upholsterer, and Valuator, 
Agent for Bicycles of Best Makers. 



MATTHEW ROBERTSON, 

Engineer and Mill-AVright, 

si^ii®i4i! e®iiii\ 

101 HIGH STREET. 



WriDcrinof Machines Covered on the Premises. 

Lawn Mowers Sharpened and Repaired. 

Mangle Rollers Turned Up or Renewed, 

Machinery in general Repaired. 

GEORGE SKED 

Dalkeitli Smitliy & Horse-Shoeing EstaWishment, 

Elmfield Place, Newmills Rd., Dalkeith. 

G.S. trusts from his long experience, and by strict personal 
attention to Orders, to merit a share of public patronage. 
The Charges in all departments will be found very Moderate. 

CftelJBalfeeitJ) asible WB^vthou^t. 



i 



JOHN GARMENT, 67 High Street, Dalkeith. 



Dalkeith 



35 



High Street — contiimed 

109 B. M'Coll, bootmaker 

113 C. Woolley and Son, spirit dealers 

(Jas. R. Montgomery) 
115 W. Dalgleisli & So:i, cork manufs. 

{Pursell's close herz) 

117 R. Johnstone, spirit dealer 
121 Mrs Stobbie, newsagent 

{Leydmis close here) 

1 27 Jas. Whitson, coal nierchant 
129 Jas. Wightman, baker 

{Hunt close here) 

133 G. Sinclair, cabinetmaker 
143 T. Montgomery, grocer 

( Plicmmer's close here) 

{Donaldson' s close here) 

151 Tlios. Ness, grocer 

HIGH STREET. 

Bight hand side. 

2 John Fergusson, spiiit dealer 
4 W. C. Gray, grocer 
8 Proctor and Young, drapers 
10-14 Wm. Thomson, draper 
16 W. S. Dickson, grocer 
20 R. Miller, watchmaker 
24 J. Dawson and Co., brush makers 
26 J. Duncan and Son, bootmakers 
26a Alex. Henderson, tailor 
28 Scottish Drug Depot 
30 A. Buchan and Co., grocers 
32 Miss Thomson, fishmonger 
34 C. B. Stewart, baker 
34a Wm. Kemp, chemist 
36 Geo. Alex. Aitken, printer 
36 Singer's Sewing Machine Co. 

{Eskdalll street Jiere) 

38 M. k J. Haig, fishmongers 

42 John M'lvor, china merchant 

44 J. Bruce, stationer 

46 J. Alexander and Co., bootmakers 

48 John Martin, baker 

50 Walter Deas, fishmonger 

{Gordon s close here) 

52 Watson Dingwall grocer 
54 George Liddell, painter 



High Street — continued 

{Porteous's close here) 

56 James Anderson, tinsmith 
58 James Young, bookseller 

{Allan's dose here) 

60 Cranston & Allan, bootmakers 

62 J. and G. M'Call, tobacconists 

64 C. Morrison 

68 Geo. A. Baird, clothier 

70 W. and T. Torteous, drapers 

74 Jos. Gray, draper 

{South street lure) 

76 P. T. Smathers, grocer 
78 Wm. Vickers, spirit dealer 
82 Andw. H. Small, baker 
86 Clydesdale bank 

( White's close eas.h h^re) 

J. Lindsay, cork manufacturer 
D. W. Nasmyth, spirit dealer 

88 Jas. Somerville, bootmaker 
90 W. Craik and Sons, Avatchmakers 
94 Wm. Kemp, druggist 
96 Jas. Affleck, bootmaker 
100 Post Office 

Thos. Kemp, printer 

{Rohertons close here) 

102 J. M'Kinlay, clothier 

104 A. K. Lawson, grocer 

106 M. M'Donald, dairy 

108 Andw. Somerville, baker 

110 David Brown, fruiterer 

114 Mrs M'Donald, refi'eshment dealer 

116 R. A. Stewart, china dealer 

( Talt street here) 

118 Gray and Handyside, solicitors 

Commercial bank of Scotland Ltd. 
120 J. Donaldson, confectioner 

( Vint's close here) 

122 G. Sinclair, cabinetmakei 
424 Arch. Whitelaw, grocer 

{Candlework ehse here) 
126 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Mrs J, KBDDIB, 

Confectioner, Green-Grocer and SmalJware Dealer 
36 South Street, Dalkeith. 



Reg'istry for Servants^ 



DALKEITH CORK FACTORY. 



WM. DALGLEISH & SON, 

115 Hig-h. Street, Dalkeith. 



JOINER, UNDERTAKER and HOUSE AGENT, 



House — li- Mitchell Street. 



LEWIS YOUM & SON, 

Boot & Shoe Warehouse, 

7 South Street, Dalkeith. 

Terms — Moderate. 
A Trial Solicited. 



Dalkeith 



37 



Htgh Strkrt — continued 

{Amos's close Iicrc) 

136 Mrs Clark, spirit dealer 
138 L. Arpino, ice crciUii dealer 

{Tolbooth close licrc) 

144 Ci-oss Keys Hotel 

146 Thomas Leitcli, confectioner 

{ScoU's close here) 

150 J. Nasmyth, confectioner 

( fFccrdlato's close here) 

152 J M 'Arthur, spirit dealer 
154 Wm. Kinuaird, butcher 
156 R. Simpson, confectioner 
160 Thos. S. Chalmers, painter 
162 J. Laidlaw, confectioner 
166 Mrs R. Kerr, china dealer 

{Moffafs close here) 

166 G. W. Porteous, grocp^ 
168 P. Mitchell, bootmaktif 
170 Jas. Brown, spirit dealer 
172 Eichd. Aytoun, spirit dealer 

( Young^s close here) 

178 Alex. Gough, baker 
182 Mrs Bennet, brushmaker 

A. Dalirleish and Son, cork manfs. 



BACK STREET. 

John Riddell, cabinetnraker 

3 Wilson and Nairn, coachbuilders 

4 Jas. Reid, boot factor 
M'Lennan & Urquhart, brewers 
21 J. Flockhart, spirit dealer 
28 Robt. Dick, blacksmith 
Alex. Neill, joiner 

32 George Grieve, slater 

34 David M'Cabe, hairdi'esser 

81 Miss Brown, spirit dealer 

83 D. and J. Campbell, contractors 

88 John Porteous, dairyman 

94 D. W. Vass, market gardener 

95 James Crichton, market gardener 

( Musseib urgh > vad^ he i r ) 



SOUTH ST. 

3 Miss M'Kinlay, tobacconist 
7 Lewis Young, bootmaker 
J. and J. Tod and Sons, grocers 

11 Jas. Hume, saddler 

13 John Wightman, saddler 
17 Andw. Cochrane, grocer 

21 G. Douglas and Son, ironmongers 

25 Wm. Milne, grocer 

29 T. W^ilson and Son, saddlers 

31 J. R. Webster, watchmaker 

2 R. Wight and Son, milliners, etc 
6 Wm. Baker, hairdresser 

12 Walter Paris, draper 
l6 C. Cochrane, painter 
2o Jas. Aitken, bootmaker 

22 Alex. Hart, plumber 
24 John Nasmyth, draper 

( White hart street here) 

26 John Allan, grocer 

30 Miss Burrell, dressmaker 

32 Edward M 'Alpine, baker 
36 Mrs Keddie, confectioner 
38 

40 John Dodds, greengrocer 



ELMFIELD PLACE. 

Wm. Raeburn, spirit dealer 

George Sked, blacksmith 

A. Chisholm and Son, joiners 

Co- Operative Store Ltd. 

A. Neilands, slater 

Wm. Watson, grocer 

Peter Buncle, rope and twine manufr. 

James Forsyth, butcher 

C. Wagstaff, dairyman 



WHITE HART STREET 

John Aitken, veterinary surgeon 
David Watson, grocer 
Thos. Hanton, solicitor 
Thomas Beveridge, plumber 
John Hanton, engineer 
Stephen Hair, builder 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



^WQ^ a 



Dispensing & Family Chemist 



87 aiiH 



I, p4iKiif a. 



Prescriptions accurately Prepared. Purest Drugs. Personal Attention. 
Spectacles and Eye Glasses. Oculist's Prescriptions Carefully Prepared. 
Toilet Requisites of all kinds. 



WM. & TtlOS. PORTEOUS, 

Clothiers and funeral Drapers, 

?© mm STiliT, ©ALICEJTH, 

Have always in Stock a Large Assortment of First-Class Goods 
in the various Departments, which,, having been selected with the 
greatest care and purchased on the most advantageous terms, they 
can with confidence recommend as of 

SUPERIOR QUALITY & GOOD VALUE, 



Coach Builders, 

BACK STREET, DALKEITH 

Coach Building in all its Branches. 
Repairs promptly attended to. 



Dalkeith 39 


BUCCLEUCH PLACE. 


BUCCLEUCH STREET. 


T. Sturrock, solicitor 


Rich. Dodds, cabinetmaker 


Dickson and Sons, fruiterers 


James Bowers, dairyman 


James Hogg, potato merchant 


AV. Alison & Son, coach builders 


John Hamilton, butcher 


John C. Smith, coach hirer 


Thomas Dickson, grocer 
Joseph Hamilton, diaper 


John Smith, contractor 
John M 'Queen, grocer 


{Graft street here) 


John Stewart, butcher 

W. Falconer & Son, tinsmiths 


Geo. Jack, solicitor 


John T. Falconer, cabinetmaker 




Miss Wilson, baby-linen warehouse 


(ParJcside place here) 


Wm. Thomson, plumber 




Miss Kerr, confectioner 


David Grieve, grocer 


T. Wightman and Son, bootmakers 


T. Wallace, photographer 




Dalkeith Railway Station 




Jas. Brunton, Harrow Hotel 


BRIDGEND. 




E. M. Crooks, grocer 


{New EdinUirgh road here) 


Jas. Cruickshank, carrier 




Arch. Dods, auctioneer 




T. Cumpstie, brickbuilder 




^!iss Fa coner, spirit dealer 


CROFT STREET. 


A. & W. Douglas, Dalkeith mills 


J. Grossart, blacksmith 




J. Haig and Sons, undertakers 




A Dawson and Co., curriers 


NORTH WYND. 


Dalkeith Gas-Light Co. 


J. Hope and Son, brassfounders 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



SEND 



for KEMP'S SAMPLE BOOKS of (i) Ball Pro- 
grammes, (2) Menu Cards, (3) Wedding Cards 
and (4) Fancy Cards. 100 High St., Dalkeith. 

These can he completed loith the Printing required, in Gold and Silver 
in an hour. 



.£200 Free Insurance - See Coupon 



Fill in Your Name at once. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



WILLIAM HUMTER & CO., 

^TLOTHIERS & (DUTFITTERS, 
I TOLBOOTH WYND, 83 HIGH STREET, 
LEITH. 



DALKEITH. 



Best Value and Selection in the District. 



JUVENILE DEPARTMENT 
Boys^ Suits, Prince and Sailor shapes, 

in Tweeds and Serges - - from 2/1 1 

Boys' Norfolk Suits, Tweeds, Serges, etc. from 5/6 
Boys^ Rugby Suits (Three Garments) from 9/6 
Boys' Overcoats and Highland Capes, irom 6/6 
Boys^ Reefers - - - from 3/11 

YOUTHS' DEPARTMENT 
Youths^ Trouser Suits, i^veeds & Serges from 12/6 
Youths' Trouser Suits, Black Jacket 

and Vest, Tweed Trousers, - from 18/6 

Youths^ Overcoats, Newest Styles - from 12/6 

GENT'S DEPARTMENT 
Gents' Suits in Tweeds and Serges - from 18/6 
Gents' Trousers, a large variety - from 3/1 1 

Gents' Overcoats, in Beavers, Friezes 

Serges, etc. - - - from 15/6 

Gents' Suits, to Order, Newest Materials from 40/- 
Gents' Trousers, to Order, Good Selection from 10/6 
Gents' Overcoats, to Order, Newest Shapes from 30/- 
Gents' Waterproof Coats, all Shapes, 

Best Makes _ _ _ from 17/6 



Summer and Winter Hosiery, Shirts, Gloves, etc. 

Hats & Caps, Umbrellas, Travelling Rugs & Bags. 

Every Description of WORKMEN'S CLOTHING. 



Principal Scottish Fairs and Trysts. 



g5g= The Editor of Carment^s Directory will feel obliged bj' notice of alterations in the 
date of any of the following Fairs being transmitted him for correction in luture publica- 
tions, and begs to state that, whilst doing his utmost to keej) the List oi Fairs correct, 
he cannot guarantee its absolute accm^acy. 



N.B. — When the appointed day happens to fall on Saturday, Sunday, ar Mqcday, the, 
fair is sometimes deferred till the Tuesday following. 



JANUARY. 

Aberfeldy, 1 Thursday o s 

Aboyne (Charlesto-nm of), cattle and horses, 

3 Thursday 
Alford, cattle, horses, etc., Tues. 3 and 24 
Alness Bridge, 2 Tuesday 
Alyth, 4 Wednesday 
Arbroath hiring, etc., last Saturday 
AjT.-, horses and cattle, Th. and Fri. before 2 

Wednesday 
Banchory-Ternan, cattle, sheep, and horses, 

last Monday 
Beauly, or Muir of Ord, cattle, 3 Thurs. 
Eeith, 1 Friday o s 

Biggar, horses and hiring, last Thursday o s 
Braco, fat cattle, 1 Wednesday 
Cornhill of Park, 2 Thursday 
Coup ar- Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Crieif, cattle, 1 Tuesday 
Cupar-Fife, cattle, horses, 1 Tuesday 
Deer (New), 3 "Wednesday 
Dounby, horses and cattle, 2 Thursday 
Dufftown, cattle and sheep, 4 Thursday 
Dunfermline, cattle and horses, 3 Tuesday 
Dunoon, 3 Thursday 
Durris, 3 Tuesday 
Echt, cattle and horses, 1 Monday 
Elgiu., cattle, etc. , 2 and last Fridays 
Ellon, 1 and 3 Mondays 
Falkirk, cattle and horses, last Thursday 
Falkland, cattle, sheep, horses, 2 Tuesday 
Fife-Keith, cattle, 3 Friday 
Finstown, horses and cattle, 3 Monday 
Fochabers, cattle, 3 Thm-sday 
Forres, cattle, etc., 1 and 3 Tuesdays 
Fortrose, cattle and produce, Monday before, 

Beauly 
Fjvie, 3 Thursday 
Glasgow, horses, every Wednesday except 

1st and 3rd ; cattle every Thursday 
Grlenlivet, day before Duiftown 
G-rantown, Tuesday after 12, and Monday 

before 3 Wednesday 
Huntly, horses, 1 Wednesday ; cattle, 1 and 

3 Wednesdays 
Insch, cattle, etc., 4 Monday 
Inverness, Friday, after Beauly 
Inverurie, cattle, etc., Tuesday 10, 31 
Johnstone, horses, 1 Friday 



Eeith cattle, horses, sheep, 1 Friday 

Kelso, cattle, Monday, 9 and 23 

Kildary, Tuesday before Beauly 

Killin, general business, 3 Tuesday 

Kirkwall, horses and cattle, 1 Monday 

Kiiriemuir, 1 Monday 

Laurencekirk, cattle, etc., every Monday;, 

feeing mart (St Anthony's Fair), laat' 

Wednesday 
Lesmahagow, 2 Wednesday 
Linlithgow, Friday after 2 Tuesday 
Lockerbie, pork, 2 Thursday o s 
Longside, Thursday after 3 Tuesday 
Lonmay station, 2 Monday 
Lumsden, 1 Monday 

Machar (New), cattle and horses, 3 Thure. 
Marnoch, cattle, Tuesday after 2 Monday 
Maud, last Monday 
Maybole, 3 Thursday 
Meigle, 2 Wednesday 
Mintlaw, 2 Tuesday 
Muir of Ord. See Beauly 
Nairn, cattle, etc., Saturday after Beauly 
Newton-Stewart, cattle, 2 Friday 
Ehj'nie, cattle, Saturday before 4 Monday 
Rothie, 2 Monday 
Stewarton, horses, cttle, etc., Thursday 

before 1 Friday o s 
Stranraer, horses, Monday before 1 Wed. 
Strathaven, general business 1 Thursday 
Strichen, cattle 1 Thursday 
Thornhill (Perthshue), 1 Tj sday 
Wiek, last Friday 
Wigtown, cattle, 4 Friday 



FEBRUARY. 

Aboyne (Charlestcwn of), cattle and horae? 

3 Thursday 
Alford, horse, cattle, etc., Tuesday 14 
AUoa, 2 Wednesday 
Alyth, 4 Wednesday 
Auchnagatt, 2 Thursday 
Auchterarder, cattle, 1 Wednesday 
Auchtermuehty, 1 Monday 
Ballater, Tuesday before, Aboyne 
Beauly, or Muir of Ord, cattle, 3 Thura. 
Beith, 1 Eriday o a 
Bonhill. horses. 1 Thuradav 



SCOTTISH FAIRS A'^D TUY8TS— Continued. 



Brechin, every Tuesday 
Blair- Athole, general business, 12 ; if Satur- 
day, Sunday, or Monday, then Snesday 

following 
Campbelltown (Argyll), horses, 1 Thur. 
Carnwath, hiring, last i^iday 
Castle-Douglas, horses, 11 if Monday ; if 

not, Monday after 
Coupar- Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Mon. 
Cumnock (Old), cattle and horses, Thur. 

after Candlemas os; general business, 

every Thursday 
Cupar-Fife, cattle and horses, 1 Tuesday 
Dalkeith, hiring, last Thursday 
Dalmellington, hiring, etc., last Thurs. 
Dingwall (Candlemas), cattle and produce, 

3 Wednesday 
Douglas, 1 Wednesday 
Dufftown, cattle and sheep, 4 Thursday 
Dumfries (Cand.), horses, 1 Tues, and Wed. 

o 8 ; hiring, 1 Wed. o s 
Dunbar hiring, 1 Tuesday 
Dunfermline, cattle, horses, 3 Tuesday 
Dunkeld, general business, 13 ; if Satiurday, 

Simday, or Monday, then Tues. following 
Dunoon, 3 Thursday 
Durris, 3 Tuesday 
Darlston, hiring, last Monday 
Echt, cattle and horses, 1 Monday 
Elgin, cattle, etc., 2 and last Fridays 
Ellon, 1 and 3 Mondays 
Finstown, horses and cattle, 3 Monday 
Fochabers, cattle, 3 Thursday 
Forres, cattle, etc., 1 and 3 Tuesdays 
Fortrose, cattle, and produce, Monday before 

Beauly 
Fyvie, 3 Thursday 
Glasgow, horses, every Wednesday 
Glenlivet, day before Dufftown 
Grantown, Monday before 3 Wednesday 
Haddington, hiring, 1 Friday 
Hosen (Orkney), 2 Wednesday 
Huntly, cattle, 1 and 3 Wednesdays 
Insch, cattle, etc., 4 Monday 
Invergordon, 3 Tuesday 
Inverness, cattle, Friday after Beauly and 

last Friday 
Inverurie, cattle, Tuesday, 21 
Keith, cattle, horses, and sheep, 1 Friday 
Kelso, cattle, Monday 6 and 20 
Kilwinning, 1 Monday 
Kirkwall, 1 Monday 
Kirriemuir, 1 Monday 
Lanark, seeds and hiring, last Tuesday 
Laurencekirk, cattle, etc., weekly 
Linlithgow, cattle and horses, last Friday 
Lockerbie, horses, and pork. 2 Thui's. o s 
Longside, Thursday after 3 Tuesday 
Markinch, cattle, etc., 2 Tuesday 
Mauchline, cows, horses, and hiring, Thurs. 

Thursday after 4 
Meigle, 2 Wednesday 
Milnathort, cattle, 2 Wednesday 
Mintlaw, 2 Tuesday 
Muir of Ord. See Beauly 
Muirkirk, hiring, Tuesday after 18 
Nairn, cattle, etc.. Sat. after Beauly 
Newton-Stewart, 2 Friday 
Paisley. 3 Thursday 
Eattray, Tuesday after 11 
Bhyne, cattje, Saturday before 4 Mon. 
Bothfe, 8 Monday 



Ruthven (Badenoch), 2 Tuesday 
Sanquhar, general business, 1 Friday o s 
Stirling, horses and cattle, 1 Friday ; horses, 

3 Friday 
Stonehaven, cattle and sheep, Thurs. before 

Candlemas o s 
Stow, hiring hinds, Friday before last Mon. 
Strathdon, 2 Ti'iday 
Stromness, 1 Wednesday 
Tarland, 2 Wed. and last Wed. o s 
Thornhill (Dumfiiesshire) , 2 Tues. s 
Toab (Orkney), 2 Wednesday 
Tobermory, horses. Wed. before Oban March 

horse market 
Turriff, cattle, 2 and 4 Wednesdays 
Wick, last Friday 
Wigtown, horses, 1 Thurs., o s; cattle, 4 Fri. 



MARCH. 

Aberfeldy, Tuesday after Perth 

Aboyne (Charlestown of), cattle and horses, 

3 Thursday 
Alford, cattle, horses, etc., Tues. 7, 28 
Alness Bridge, cattle, etc., 1 Tuesday 
Alyth, 4 Wednesday 

Auchinleek, grit ewes and hoggs, last Thurs. 
Auchterarder, cattle, last Wednesday 
Balgau', sheep, last Tuesday 
Banchoiy-Teman, cattle, sheep, and horeM, 

last Thursday 
Beauly, or Muir of Ord, 3 Wed., sheep only, 

Thiu'sday, cattle and horses 
Biggar, seeds and general business, Thurs. 

after 1 Tuesday 
Blairgowrie, horses and cattle, 3 Wednesday 
Bunessan, horses, 2 Sat. after Falkirk 
Callander, hiring, 3 Thursday 
Campster (Caithness), last Tuesday 
Carluke, 2 Thursday 
Castle-Douglas, 23 if Mon.; if not, Mon. 

after 
Chapeltown, last Wednesday o s 
Comi-ie, corn and hiring, 3 Wednesday 
Cornhill of Park, 2 Thursday 
Coupar- Angus, horses, etc., 3 Thurs, 
Ciieif, horses, cattle, hiring, and genera 

business, 1 Tuesday 
Cumnock (Old), hiring, etc., Thursday after 6 
Cupar-Fife, cattle, horses, 1 Tuesday 
DalmaUy, cattle, etc., 3 Wednesday 
Douglas, 3 Friday 
Dounby, horses and cattle, 2 Thurs. 
Duft'town, cattle, sheep, and horses,4 Thurs. 
Dumbarton, 3 Tuesday 
Dumfries, hiiing, last Wednesday 
Dunfermline, cattle and horses, 3 Tues. 
Duns, hiring, 1 Tuesday 
DuiTis, 3 Tuesday 
Echt, horses and hiring, 1 Monday 
Elgin, cattle, etc., 2 and last Fri.; hii-ing, 3 

Friday 
EUon, 1 and 3 Mondays 
Falkirk, cattle, horses, 1 Thurs.; tryst, last 

Tuesday 
Falkland, cattle, sheep, horses, 3 Thur. 
Fife-Keith, cattle, 8 Friday 
Finstown, horses and cattle, 3 Monday 
Firth (Orkney), 3 Monday 
Fochabers, cattle, 4 Wednesday 
Forres, cattle, etc.. I and 3 Tue sday 



Dalkeith 
Professions and Trades Directory 



JEraied Water Manufacturers 

WooUey, Charles, & Son, 113 High st 

Auctioneers 

Buchan, Wm., North wynd 
Doiis, Archibald, Bridgend 
Riddell, John, Elmfield pi 
Sinclair, G., 1 22 High st 

Bakers 

Co-operative Store Coy., Elmfield place 
Kemp, William, 29 High st 
M' Alpine, Edward, 32 South st 
M'Leod, Wm., 39 High st 
Martin, John, 48 High st 
Moffat, James, & Co., 3 Muirpark place 
Small, Andrew H., 82 High st 
Somerville, Andrew, 108 High st 
Stewart, Charles B., 34 High st 
Wightman, J^mes, 129 High st 

Bill Posters 

Aitken, Richard, North wynd 
Steadman, Thomas, 52 High st 

Blacksmiths 

Alison, W. , & Son, Buccleuch st 
Dick, Robert, 28 Back st 
Grossart, James, Croft st 
-Sked, George, Newmills road 
Wight, William, White's close west 
Young, Adam, Gallowshall, Eskbank 

Booksellers and Stationers 

Garment, John, 67 High st 
Lyie, P. &D., 45 High st. 
Young, James, 58 High st 



Boot and Shoe Makers 

Aitken, James, 20 South st 
Affleck James, 96 High st 
Alexander, James, & Co., 46 High st 

Cranston & Allan, 60 High st 

Duncan, J., & Son, 26 High st 
Dodds, Robert, 47 & 85 High st 
M'Coll, Bernard, 109 High st 
M'lvor, J., Edinburgh rd 
Mitchell, P., 168 Highst 
Reid, James, 4 Back st 
Somerville, James, 88 High st 
Young & Son, Lewis, 7 South st 

Bassfounders 

Hope, John, & Son, North wynd 



Brewers and Maltsters 

M'Lennan Sc Urquhart, Back st 

Brickbuilders 

Campstie, Thomas, Bridgend 
Dennis, John, Park rd, Eskbank 
M'Leod, Jas., & Son, 14 Muirpark 

Brush Manufacturers 

Bennett, Mrs Arthur, 182 High ss 
Dawson, James, & Co., 24 High st 

Builders 

Hair, Stephen, White Hart st 
Monteith, Wm., 61 Muirpark 
Muirhead, John, Mitchell st 
Steven, W'Hiam, 19 Muirpark plaee 



42 



Professions and Trades Directory 



Butchers 

Co-operative Store Coy., Elmfield place 
Finlay, "William, i68 High st 
Forsyth, James, Elmfield place 
Hamilton, John, Buccleuch place 
Kinnaird, Wm., 154 High st 
Nelson & Sons, James, loi High st. 
Stewart, John, Buccleuch st 
Tait, James, 93 High st 
Watson, John, 49 High st 

Cabinetmakers 

Buchan & Co, North wynd 
Dodds, Richard, Buccleuch st 
Falconer, John T,, Buccleuch st 
Riddell, John, Elmfield pi 
Sinclair, G., 122 High st 

Carriage Hirers 

Brodie, John, Cross Keys hotel 
Cowan, John, Elmfield pi 
Hislop, R. & A., Justinlees stables 
Smith, John C, Buccleuch st 



Carriers — Seepa^ge 3. 
Cattle Dealer 

Dods Archibald, Bridgend 

Chemists and Druggists 

Archer, Geo. B. W., 87 High sc 
Kemp, Wm., 9, 24a, and 94 High st 
Scottish Drug Depot, 28 High st 

Chimney Sweepers 

Murphy, J., Eskdaill st 
Simpson, James, Young's close 
Simpson, R., 156 High st 

China Merchants 

M'lvor, John, 40 High st 
Morrison C, loi High st 
Thomson, W., 10-14 High st 

Clergy — See page 5. 

Clothiers 

(See Tailors and Clothiers) 



Coach Builders 

Ali'Bin, W. , & Son, Buccleuch st 
Gibson Bros., Lothian blc 
Wilson and Nairn, Back st 

Coal Merchants 

Mui.ro, Jas. , Eskrlaill st 
Pryde, John, 190 High st 
Rodger, John, Lothian rd 
Steele, John, 86 Buccleuch st 
Whitson, James, 127 High st 

Confectioners 

Buchan, N. & J., 41 High st 
Foreman Frederick, Bankhead 
Keddie, Mrs, 36 S)uth st 
Rough John, 57 High st 
Thomson, Miss, 32 High st 

Cork Manufacturers 

Dalgleish, Alex., & Son, 90 Back st 
Dalgleish, W., & Son, 115 High st 
Lindsay, James, White's close east 

Corn Mill Masters 

Douglas, A. & W., Dalkeith mills 
Gray, John, Elginhaugh mills 

Curriers and Leather Merchants 

Dawson, Andrew, & Co., Croft st 

Dairy Keepers 

Bowers, James, Buccleuch st 
Bruce, John, 16 Back st 
Campbel, D. & J., 83 Back st 
Cornwall, Mrs, Lothiftn st 
Hutchison, J., Westfield 
Kenneth, C, Dalhousie road 
Lindores, Mrs, North wynd 
Maben, Wm., 18 EskHaill st 
M'Donald, M., 106 High st 
M'Call, Thos., London rd 
M'Luskie, Patrick, Lothian st 
Ogilvie, Jas., 180 High st 
Porteous, John, 88 Back st 
Reynolds, M., Lothian rd 
Rodger. J., Lothian rd 
Smith, Mrs, Buccleuch st 
Wagstaff, C, Elmfield pi 
Watson, Thomas, 2 Mitchell st 
Whitson, James, 127 High st 
Young, Robert, Eskdaill st 



Professions and Trades Directory 



43 - 



Drapers 

(See also Tailors and Clothiers) 

Brown, James, 37 High st 
Co-operative Store Co., Elmfield place 
Gray, Joseph, 72 and 74 Hi^h st 

% Himilton, Jjs., Buccleuch pi 
Murdoch, Robert, 25 High st 
Nasmyth, John, 24. South st 
Taris,' Walter, 12 South st 

^ Porteous, W. & T., 70 High st 

I Procter & Young, 8 High st 
Ritchie, D. , 1 5 High st 
Thomson, W., IO-14 High st 
Wight, R., & Son, 2, 4, & 8 South st 

Dressmakers 

( Those marhed * are also Milliners) 

* Aitlcen, Miss, 71 High st 
Bell, Miss, Edinburgh road 
Burrell, M ss E., 30 South st 
Carse, Miss, 74 High st 
Chisholm, Miss, 11 High st 

* Hamilton, Jos., Buccleuch pi 
Kay, Mrs, Elmfield pi 
Lai'dlaw, Mrs, 136 High st 
Morris'.n, Miss, Parkside place 
M'AIpine, Miss, 51 Back st 
M'Intosh and Thomson, 59 High st 

^ *Murdoch, Elbert, 25 High st 
1^ Pettie, Mrs, 7 High st 

■•■Ritchie, David, 15 High st 

S-ir.<, Miss, Benbught 

Tervet, Miss, 25 Esk place 

* Thomson, W., I0-14 High st 

•• Wight, R., & Son, 2, 4, & 8 South st 
Wilson, Miss, 15 Muirpark pi 

Drysalter 

Fairweather, Robert, Edinburgh rd 

Emigration Agent 
Carment, John, 67 High st 
Engineer 

Ilanton, John, White Hart st 

Fancy Warehouses 

Bruce, Jas., 44 High st 
Carlyle, Jas., 99 High st 
Carment, John, 67 High st 
M'Dougal, I. & R., 21 High st 



Fishmongers & Egg Merchants 

D^as, Walter, 50 High st 
Haig, M. &J., 38 Highst 
Thomson, Miss, 32 High st 

Gardeners— Jo65m(/ 
Davidson, J., Water Tower Nursery 
Dickson Sc Son, Buccleuch place 
Foreman, Fred., Bankhead, Eskbank 
Gar vie, Hugh, Vint's close 
Gunn, John, 5 South st . 

Pryde, Walter, Croft st 
Steedman, Robt., 5 South st 

MarTcet 
Crichton, James, 95 Back st 
Dickson & Son, Buccleuch place 
Dickson, Henry, Gibraltar 
Thomson, George, Viewfield 
Vass, David W. , 94 Back st 
Wallace, John, Back st 

Grocers 

(Those marTced * are Licensed) 

* Aitken, Mrs W. R. 95 High st 

* Allan, John, 26 South st 
Bishop, Robt., 33 High st 

'•' Brown, C. K., & Sons, i Eskdaill st 
Buchan, A., & Co., 30 High st 



Cochrane, 



17 South st 



Co-operative Store Coy., Elmfield place 
Crooks, E. M., Marchbank 
Davidson Bros., 13 High st 
Dickson, Thomas, Buccleuch place 
Dickson, Wm. S., 16 High st. 
"' Dingwall, Watson, 52 High st 
Duncan, John, Westfield cottages 
Forrester, Ebenezer, 55 High st 
Gray, William C, 4 High st 
Grieve, David, Buccleuch place 
Lawson, Alexander K., 104 High st 
Milne, William, 23 and 25 South st 

* Mitchell Brothers, 77 High st 
M'Donald, Mrs, 143 High st 

* M'Queen, John, Buccleuch st 
Porteous, George W. , 166 High st 
Smathers, Peter T., 76 High st 
Tod , J. & J. , & Sons, 9 South st 

* Watson Brothers, 91 High st 
Watson, David, White Hart st 
Watson, Wm. , Elmfield pi 
Whitelaw, Archibald, 124 High st 
Wightman, John, 103 High st 
Dodds, John, South st 



44: 



Professions a7id Trades Directory 



Greengrocers and Fruit Merchants 

Brown, David, no High st 
Dickson & Son, Buccleuch place 
Keddie, Mrs James, 36 South st 
Thomson, Miss, 32 High st 

Hairdressers 

Baker, William, 6 South st 
Donachie, James, Edinburgh road 
M'Cabe, David, Back st 



Hatter 

Sinclair, M'Kenzie, 5 High st 

Hotels 

{Licensed) 

Brodie, John, Cross Keys 
Brunton, James, Harrow 



Ironmongers and Seedsmen 

Douglas, G., & Son, 21 South st 

Gray 5j Taylor, 73.High st 

Metcalfe, Duncan k Co. , 59 & 61 High 



Joiners 

(See also Cabinetmakers ) 

Chisholm, Arch,, & Son,Elmfield pi 
Gibson Bros., Lothian bank 
Haig, Jas, and Son, Croft st 
Hogg, Robert, Edinburgh rd 
Neill, Alexander, Back st 
Penman, John, Newmills 

Lathsplitters 

Ross, D. &J., Bnccleuch st 

Millwright 
Robertson, M., 1 01 High st 



Medical Practitioners 

Ballantyne, Alexander, Ashton 
Lucas, Robert, Buccleuch st 
Whyte, J. Curtis, the Elms 



Newsagents 

E aiJ, John, 3 High st 
Bruce, James, 44 High st 
Garment, John, 67 High st 
Johnstone, A., 103^ High st 
Lyie, P. & D., 45 High st 
M'Kinlay, ^liss, 3 South st 
Smith, Wm., 89 High st 
Stobbie, Mrs, 121 High st 
Young, James, 58 High st 

Newspaper Repesentatives 

Burnett, J. R.,45 High st — 

" Dalkeith Advertiser." 

t * Kemp, Thomas, 100 High st — 
* Rep., Press Association. 

t denotes connection with the 
Institute of Journalists 

Nurserymen 

{See also Market Gardeners) 
Davidson, John, Water Tower 
Dickson & Son, Buccleuch place 
foreman, Frederick, Bankhead 

Painters, Paperhangers and 
Glaziers 

Chalmers, T. S., 160 High st & Tait st 
Cochrane, Colin^ 16 and x8 South st 
Liddell, George, 54 High st 
Potter, S., & Son, 23 and 27 High st 

Pawnbroker 

Ireand, Mrs, Eskdaill st 

Photographer 

■\^ a lace, Thomas, Buccleuch place 

Plasterers 

Hill, William, Young's close 
Robertson, John, Parksi;le pi 

Plumbers 

Beveridge, Thomns, White Hart st 
Hart, Alexander, 22 South st 
Thomson, William, Buccleuch st 
Thorburn, W., 97 High st 



Professions and Trades Directory 



45 



Potato Merchants 

EJiajtm, G^^rg;, Njrth wynd 
Hogg, Jame?, Buccleuch place 

Printers 

A tken, George, 36 High st 
Garment, John, 67 High st 
Kemp, Thomas, 100 High st 
Lyle, P. & D., 45 High st 

Rope and Twine Manufacturer 

Buncle, Peter, Elmfield place 

Saddlers 

Hum?, James, 11 South st 
Wightman, John, 13 South st 
Wilson, Thjmas, & Son, 29 South st 

Sewing Machine Depots 

Djdds, Ribert, 47 and 85 High st 
Singer Machine Coy., 36 High st 

Slaters 

Grieve, George, & son, 32 Back st 
Neilanils, A ex., Elmfield pi 
McCarter, Wm., London rd 
Simpson, Robt., 156 High st 

Solicitors 

Anderson & Chisholm, Eskbank 
Gray & Handyside, 118 High st 
Hanton, Thomas, White Hart st 
Jack, George, Fairfie'd place 
Sturrock, Thomas, Buccleuch place 

Spirit Dealers 

{Sec also Hotels) 
A>toun, Richard, 172 High st 
Brown, James, 170 High st 
Brown, Miss, Wheat Sheaf Inn 
Clark, Mrs, 136 High st 
Dodds, James, 43 High st 
Falconer, Miss, Bridgend 
Ferguson, John, Buck's Head 
Flockhart, fn., 21 Back st 
Johnstone, Robt., 117 High st 
Naismith, V/. Black Bull Inn, Lothian st 
Nasmyth. D. W., 86 High st 
Noble, Robert, Justinlecs 
Kaeburn, William, Old Meal Market Inn 



Spirit Dealers —Continued 
M'Arthur, J., 152 High st 
Vickers, William, 78 High st 
Whitson, George, 51 High st 
Woolley, Chas. & Son, 113 High st 

Tailors and Clothiers 

Baird, George A., 68 High st 
Brown, William, 3 Westfield park 
Calder, William, Lothian st 
Dalgleish, P. and L., 1 High st 
Gray, Joseph, 72 and 74 High st 
Hamilton, Joseph, Buccleuch pi 
Hunter, William, & Co., 83 High st 
M'Dougal, George, 31 High st 
Middlemass, Wm. S., J67 High st 
M'Kinlay, James, 102 High st 
Murdoch, Robert, 25 High st 
Plain, Francis, White's close west 
Porteous, W. & T., 70 High st 
Pretsell, Wm., loi High st 

Tea and Coffee Dealers 

London & Newcastle Tea Co., 63 High st 

Tinsmiths and Gasfitters 

Anderson, James, 56 High st 
Copland, John, Lothian st 
Falconer, W. & Son, Buccleuch st 

Undertakers 

Falconer, John T., Buccleuch st 
Haig, James & Son, Croft st 
Sinclair, G., 122 High st 



Veterinary Surgeons 

Aitken, John, White Hart st 
M'lntosh,J W.,Eskbank 

Watchmakers 

Bryson & Sons, 65 High st 
Craik, William, and Sons, 90 High st 
Miller, Robert, 20 High st 
Webster, John R., 31 South street 

Wood Merchant 

rirrie, George, Hardengreen 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



EngiiiccrB anb f^dillujiigljts, 

Iron anh Brass Founkis, 
LOANHEAD FOUNDRY. 

Established 1756. 

Experienced Bnguieers sent ta all parts of the 
Bannixx} for Erecting and Sepairing of all Mnds 
of Wacltincry* 
All kinds of Castings and Repair Work quoted for. 



AITCHISON & CO., 

LOANHEAD FOUNDRY. 

""ROBERT LIDDELL, 

Bridge End House, LASSWADE. 



OILS, BRUSHES, and COLOURS. 
Gbs.s Cut to Oi'iler. \Vi}i(lows Cleaned and Olazed. 

PAPER-HANGINGS IN GREAT VARIETY. 

a£200 Free Insurance - See Coupon. 

Fill in Your Name at once. 



BONNYRIGG 

( See also Lasswade.) 

Post Office — R, M'Bey, postmaster. 

Deliveries— 8 a.m., 12.30 and 5.15 p m. 
Box closes at 9-50 and 11.45 a.m.; 2-50, 5-15, 6-30 and 8.15 p.m. 

Commissioners of Police — Buegh of Bonnyrigg. 

Robt. Ketchen, provost ; Geo. Brown, and R. Muirliead, bailies; Robert Bird. 
I'eter Gallacher, Jas. Stoddart, Peter Hinshelwood, Thos. Rae, and A. Gilchrist. 
Robert M'Bey, clerk. James Craig, treasurer and collector. 

CocKPEN Parish Council. 

Wm. Stewart, chairman ; J. A. Stoddart, W. Vickers, Jas. Moffat, A. Gray, 
D. Robertson, T. Robertson, C. Skelton, and Rev D. W. L. Wallace. 

]J>. B. Tod, collector. John Muir, inspector. Drs Allan and Inch, medical officers. 
Registrar — J. G, Forbes, 56 High st. 

CocKPEN School Board. 

C. J. Allan, chairman ; Rev R. T. Loudon, Archibald Gilchrist, Rev D. W. L. 
' Wallace; R. Ketchen, R. Muirhead, and W. Vickers. 

D, B. Tod, treasurer and clerk. 

Bonnyrigg Water Company (Limited). 
William Stewart, chairman ; David B. Tod, S.C.C, secretary. 

Bowling Club — J. Donaldson, pres,; J. Burns, secretary; Andrew Gray, treasurer. 

Places of Worship. — Established Church — Rev. D. W. L. Wallace, Cockpen. 
Free Church— Rev. R. T. Loudon. 

BoNxNyrigg and Lasswade Total AbstiiNence Society. 

J. J. Bell, pres.; G. Storie & D. Robertson, vice-do.; J. Barrie, treas, G. Brown, secy 

Choral Union. — Robert Dundas of Arniston, Hon-Pres.; John Mochrie, secretary. 

Bonnyrigg and District Ornithological Society— Peter Milne, vice- 
president. 

Cockpen Constitutional (Conservative) Association— Instituted 1887. 
Robert Dundas of Arniston, president ; J. F. Lowson, chairman ; A. Ketchen, secy. 

Dundas Cricket Club. 
John Faterson, captain j W. Dalgleish, secretary. 



48 



Bonnyrigg 



Aikman, Mrs, Hoo-gan's cott 
Aitken, Jamcj, drug^'ist, Hillliead 
Aitken, James, papermaker, Camp view 
Alexander, Robt., daiiyman, 13 Polton st 
Alexander, Jas., joiner, 13 Union park 
Alexander, John, draper, 27 Lothian st 
Allan, Colin, greengrocer, Dundas st 
Anderson, Uavid, weaver, Lothian st 
Anderson, John, blacksmith, Polton st 
Anderson, Miss, Dalhousie grange 
Anslow, Daniel, 15 Union park 
Armstrong, Allan, manager Polton colliery 
Aytonn, l)r J. H., View Park 



Baillie. J. , grocer. Camp view 

Baillie, Mrs, china merchant, 33 High st 

Bain, John, Camp view 

Baircl, David, gamekeeper, Dalhousie 

Balderston, J., x^ublican, 24 Dundas st 

Barrie, Joseph, clothier, 23 High st 

Beazer, Joseph, designer, Viewpark 

Bethune, David, joiner, 12 Lothian st 

Beveridge, J. & J., grocers, Newtonloan 

Bird, Robt., coach-hirer, 93 High st 

Black, David, weaver. Camp view 

Black, Mrs, 10 High st 

Boag, John, weaver, 46 Dundas st 

Bonnar, George, Camp view 

Bonnyrigg Coffee House, 87 High street— 

Jas. Lees, manager 
Borthwick, G., mason, C7 Lothian st 
Borthwick, James, smith, Lothian st 
Bowie, A., grocer, etc., 2 High st 
Boyd, Miss Jessie H., Marylield 
Boyd, John, grocer, etc., 5 High st 
Bracks, John, millworkei', Polton st 
Briggs, Alex., signalman, Lothian st 
Brown, Alex., ploughman, C7 Dundas st 
Brown, D., clerk, Durham pi 
Brown, G. , insurance agent, 9 Union park 
Brown, John, joiner, 47 Lothian st 
Brown, Joscith, mason, 61 Dundas st 
Brown, Mrs Ann, 9 Lothian st 
Brown, Mrs, lishmongcr, 51 High st 
Brown, Mrs, 47 Dundas st 
Brown, Mrs, dressmaker, Maryfield pi 
Brown, Wm., weaver, 25 High st 
Brown, James, 42 Newfield place 
Brown, James, weaver, Lothian st 
Bruce, David, wea^s^er, 35 Lothian st 
Buist, John, dresser, 59 Lothian st 
Bruuton, Thomas, mason, 94 High st 



Brydone, Wm., 31 Lothian st 
Brydon, James, sinker, Polton st 
Buchanan, Mrs, 50 High st 
Buchanan, W. D., Viewfortli gdns 
Burnett, W., fireman, 4 Pac^tory terrace 
Burns, James, millworker, Leyden place 
Burns, John, insurance supL, 25 Union pk g 

Cairns, James, carter, 23 L.-)thian st 
Cairns, Miss, stationer, etc., 10 Dundas st 
Cairns, Robert, millworker, Polton st I 

Caldwell, John, weaver, 17 High st ' 

Campbell, H. D., butcher, 96 High st 
Campbell, Mrs James, 62 Polton st 
Campbell, Martin, police station 
CampbelJ, Thos., weaver, Marybank 
Carter, Da-vid, f-mith, Stanley pi 
Carter, Miss Isabella, 48 Dundasst 
Chisliolui, Thomas, Prestonholm 
Christie, Jas. , grocer, 48 High st 
Clapperton, John, grocer, etc., Dundas st 
Clark, George, Ltydenpl 
Clark, John, weaver, T^eyden pi 
Clark, Mrs, 43 High st 
Clark, Robert, Aveaver, Lothian st 
Clark, Wm., weaver, 92 High st 
Cockburn, Alex., fireman, Dundas st 
Cockburn, John, smith, 34 High st 
Cockburn, R., millworker, 65 Lothian st 
Co-operative Store, High st — Jas. Jack, 

manrgcr ^ 

Cook, John, joiner, Durham p] ^ 

Cottam, Mrs, Liinkbonny 
Cow<^ Robert, platelayer, Leyden park 
Cox, Thomas, tailor, 12 High st 
Crabb, Wm., dresser, 7 Union j ark 
Craig, Allan, weaver, 83 Polton st 
Craig, James, draper, 15 Dnndr.s st 
Ciijg, Robert, weaver, Leyden place 
Craig, Wm. , clothier, 6 Dundas st 
Cunningham, Mrs, 41 Lothian st 
Cunningham, Wm., 92 High st 
Cusiter, Mrs, Gracemount, Maryfield 
Cuthbertson, George, weaA'cr, Polton st 



Dalgieish, Adam, Poltun st 
Dalgleish, James, dresser, 68 Pligh st 
Dalgieish, Robt., dresser. High st 
Dalgleish, R., millworker, 35 Polton st 
Dalgieish, R., mason, 31 Dundas st 
Dalgleish, Thomas, 71 Dundas st 
Dalgleish, Wm., croppei', Alewlorth p] 



Bonnyrigg 



49 



Davidson, James, joiner, Poltonball 
Davidson, John mason, Poltonhall 
Davidson, Jas. , joiner, 12 Duudas st 
Davidson, James, 63 Lothian st 
■ Davidson, Miss, teacher, 
Davie, John, 37 Lothian st 

^ Davie, Geo., miner, 13 Dalhousie cotts. 

r Denholin, John, mason, 39 Lcthian st 
Dennis, John, Brixvvold 
Dickson, Andi-ew, 69 Lothian st 
Dickson, John, smith, Newfiekl phice 

I Dickson, T., carter, 1 Factory terrace 
Donaklson, Alexander, Prestonholm 
Donaldson, Jas., joiner, 25 High st 
Donaldson, Ptobert, Camp view 
Donnet, Mrs E., 4 Union park 
Douglas, John, Lothian st 
Dryburgh, Jas, blacksmith, Poltonhall 
Dryden, Pobert, joiner, 17 Union park 
Dudgeon, R., labourer, Newfield place 
Dudgeon, Thomas, guard, 29 Polton st 
Dunbar, George, joiner, 41 Lothian st 

Easton, Peter, Durham pi 

Easton, James, weaver, 71 Dundas st 

Elliot, Wm., mason, 24 High st 



Eaickney, Wm., 61 Lothian st 
Fisher, H., miner, 4 Durham bank 
Forbes, James G., registrar, 56 High st 
Forsyth, Andrew, joiner, Polton st 
' Forsyth, Peter, flesher, 5 Dundas st 
Eraser, John, timekeeper, 1 Union pk 
Eraser, Thos, Camp view 
Eraser, Wm., weaver, Camp view 

Gacr, Alex., millworker, 35 Dundas st 
. (jiallacher, Peter, builder, Canii) view 
Gallocher, Jas., millworker, 17 Union pk 
Gardner, Wm., engineman, Newtonloan 
Gardner, Mrs, 25 Dundas st 
(jlil)sou, Chas., Union pk 
Gilchrist, John, coal agent, Higli st 
(Gilchrist, :\., commission agt., Ivanhoe 
GillieSj Thomas, 58 Dundas st 
Gordon, Mrs, Dundas st 
Graham, J., Cock^jcn school 
Gregoi', Mrs W., Lauder villa 
Goldifi. D.. mason, 65 Dundas st 
Gordon, Mrs, 37 Dundas st 
Gray, Mrs, 26 High st 
Gray, Misses, Swift villa 
Gray, Andrew, draper, 39 High st 
Guy on, M., Poseniount 



Haldane, R., paper maker, 11 Dundas st 
Hare, Andrew, weaver, Polton st 
Harj^er, J,, Camp view 
Henderson, Mrs, Polton st 
Henderson, J., bootmaker, 14 Polton st 
Hill, Andrew, 65 Dundas st 
Hinshelwood, P., joiner, High st 
Hogg, John, grocer, 40 Dundas st 
Hogg, J., signalman, 57 Dundas st 
Hogg, R., millworker, 37 Dundas st 
Hogg, Rich., signalman, Lothian st 
Hoggan, Wm., baker, 5 Polton st 
Holding. A., drill instructor 
Holmes, James, weaver, 112 High st 
Hood & Simpson, engineers, Polton st 
Hope, Andrew, joiner, 19 Union park 
Horsburgh, James, mason, 27 Dundas st 
Horsburgh, Richard, 25 Polton st 
Horsburgh, W., blacksmith, Leyden pk 
Howden, James, sinker, 57 Dundas st 
Hughes, Mrs E., 45 Polton st 
Hunter, James, iireman, Polton st 
tlutcheon, Wm., chemist, 21 High st 
HuUi, Fred., lithographer, Rockville ter 

Inglis, A., surfaceman, 25 Lothian st 
Inglis, George, joiner. 17 Durham bank 
Inglis, James, gardener, Lothian st 
Inglis, James, joiner, Leyden park 
Inglis, James, dairyman, Maryfield place 

Jack, James, store manager 
Jackson, Adam, baker, Polton st 
Jackson, Miss, draper, 25 Polton st 
Jamieson, Thos., muson, Lothian st 
Johnston, John, weaver, 35 Dundas st 
Johnstone, Robert, moulder, 7 Union pk 
Johnstone, Wm., saddler, 30 Dundas st 
Jolly, Paterson, weaver, Leven cott 

Kay, Mrs W. , Ivy bank 
Kay, H., corn merchant, Ivy bank 
Kerr, Jamies, weaver, 41 Lothian st 
Kerr, Rich., weaver, 6 High st 
Kerr, Thomas, miner, 39 Lothian st 
Ketchen, M., forrester, Dalhousie lodge 
Ketchen, Mrs, Viewforth pi 
Ketchen, Robt., builder, Rockville terr 
King, Thomas, 65 Lothian st 
Kirk, Robert, weaver, Leyden pi 
Knowles, Andrew, painter, 70 High st 
Knox, Robt., enginedriver, Lothian st 

Land), Geoi'ge, sinker, Dundas st 
Langlade, Piere, Lothian st 



50 



Bonnyrigg 



Laurie, Thomas, Tereima cott 

Law, Angus, dairyman, Polton st 

Law, Miss, milliner, 8 Polton st 

Law, Mrs, Ley den park 

Lawrie, Wm. , weaver, 60 High st 

Leekie, Alex., slater, 89 High st 

Leithead, R., fancy warehouse, 74 High st| jMillar 



IMarr, W., signalman, Bonnyrigg station 
Mason, W., joiner, 12 Factory terrace 

iMeldrum, Wm., weaver, 112 High st 
Millar, And., contractor, 49 Dundas st 
Miller, Jas., S., hairdresser, 10 Polton st 



Lindsay, David, painter. New st 
Lockart, James, clerk, 34 Polton st 
Lockie, Miss, Maryfield 
Logan, James, station agent 
Lome, W., conftc'doner. Camp view 
Lothian Coal Coy. Ltd. Polton pits 
Loudon, Ptev. R. T., B.D., CockpenF.C. 
Lumsden, W., mill worker, 39 Lothian st 



M'Allister, W., 16 Lothian st 
M 'Alpine, Jamrs, weaver, Polton st 
M'Alpine, Thos., 45 High st 
M 'Alpine, Thomas, mason, 51 Dundas st 
M'Beath, Peter, newsagent, 53 High st 
M'Bey, Robert, ironmonger, 71 High st 
M'Ca'be, Mrs, Prestonholme 
M'Comb, Robert, 71 Lothian st 
M'Donald, J., weaver, 27 High st 
M 'Donald Wm., hairdresser, 27 High st 
M'Dougal, Thomas, Dalhousie castle 
M'Douga\ W. H., cashier, Maryfield pi 
M'Gill, Hugh, Camp view 
M'Gowan, H., watchmaker, 8 Dundas st 
M 'Hardy, Peter, sinker, Polton st 
M 'Lines, Hector, Polton st 
M'Int03h, Charles, Eldin pi 
M Intyre, John, 9 Factory ten-ace 
M'Kenzie, John, coach-hirer, Dundas st 
M'Kenzie, Mrs, Whitehill villa 
M'Kie, John, miner, Lothian st 
M'Laren, J., railway guard, New street 
M'Lareii, John, 78 Dundas st 
M'Lean, A., timekeeper, 47 High st 
]\rLean, Alex., timekeeper, Lothian st 
M'Lean, John, Avcaver, 24 Dundas st 
M'Lean, John, weaver, 45 High st 
M'Lean, W., millworker, 9 Dundas st 
M'Lean, Wm., weaver, 64 Dundas st 
M'Leish, John, Leyden plaee 
M'Lellan, George, smith, 16 Dundas st 
M'Millan, Thos., weaver, 108 High st 
M'Neill, John, fireman, Poltonhall 
M'Neill, W., millworker, 67 Stanley pi 
M'Night W^n., Waverley Hotel 
M'Taggart, Wm., R.S.A., Dean park 
]\L'Vee, Wm., weaver 29 Dundas st 
l^L'Vey, Thomns, i)Ovter, 2 Durham bank 
M'Vee, Wm., 6 Dundas st 



rs John, Dadiousie pi 
Moffat, Andrew, labourer, 45 Dundas st 
Moffat, James, Elgin cott 
Moffat, A\"m., weaver, 64 Dundas st 
Moffat, Wm, jr., Lothian st 
Montgomery, James, 14 Hillhead 
Moodie, W., hairdresser, 20 Polton st 
Muir, John, inspector of poor 
Munro, Mrs, grocer, etc., 75 Polton st 
Murray, Robt., publican, 28 High st 
Murray, James, dairyman, 111 High st 

Neilands, Alex., Lothian st 
Ni(diols, N. G., Durham pi 
Nisbet, A., mason, 60 Dundas st. 
Noble, Alex., millworker, 61 Lothian st. 
Noble, A. P, chemist. High st 

Ormiston, Thos., grocer, Polton st 
Oswahl, James, Eldin pi 

P.iterson, John, plumber, Durham pi 
Paterson, George, 59 Lothian st 
Paterson, Jo\m, Rosely cott 
Paterson, Miss, Bellevue pi 
Paterson, Miss, fancy bazaar, Dundas st 
Paterson, Wm., plumber, 19 High st 
Paton, John, grocer, etc., 2 Dundas st 
Peacock, Richard, miner, Lothian st 
Pearson, George, 21 Union pk 
Peden, A. W., 12 Union pk 
Peden, George, joiner, 14 Union park 
Penderleith, Mrs, 49 Polton st 
Pendreigh, G., farmer, Upper Dalhousie 
Penman, R., clerk, 39 Dundas st 
Pennycuick, Miss, 119 High st 
Pennycuik, John, joiner. High st 
Pettigrew, Mrs, Maryfield pi 
Philip, A. , miner, 65 Stanley pi 
Philip, James, engineer, Leyden pi 
Philip, Wm. , 63 Dundas st 
Pirrie, Mrs, 2 Lothian st 
Pringle, Mrs, 103 High st 
Porteous, Wm., grocer, Poltonhall 

Rae, Mrs, 37 Lothian st 

Rae, Thomas, Gordon bank, Lothian st 

R-id, Alex., 59 Dundas st 

Reid, John, labourer, 55 High st 

Reid, John, millworker, 50 Polton st 



JBonnyri^ 



51 



Reicl, Robt, engineman, 26 High st 
Kennie, A. C!., watchmaker, 72 High st. 
Renton, William, Leyden pi 
Rigby, Francis, 'miner, Lothian st 
Richardson, James, miner, 55 Polton st 
Richardson, Thomas, 2 Lamb's ct. 
Ritchie, John, gardener, Qunrryfoot 
Ritchie, Wm. , Camp view 
Roberts, Mrs., 49 Dandas st 
Robertson, A. S., clot'iier, 36 High st 
Roliertson, D., insurance agt. , Polton st 
Robertson, John, bootmaker, 117 High st 
Robertson, Mrs, 75 Dundas st 
Robertson, Thos., weaver, 3 Union pi:. 
Robertson, Wm., tailor. High st 
Robertson, Henry, contractor 3 Lamb's ct 
Robertson, W., stn-agmt, Duham pi. 
Ross, Alex., firenrm, Lothian st 
Ross, John, blacksmith, 11 Unionpark 
Roy, Robert, tuner, Myredale 
Ruthven, Thomas, weaver, Lothian st 
Ruthven, John, paper maker, 67 High st 



Sandercombe 
Scott, James, 
Scott, James, 
Scott, Mrs P. 
Scott, AVm., 



Mrs, 
joiner, 



41 High st 
20 Dundas st 
foreman, 86a High st 
, Hoggan's cott 
grocer, etc., Hillbead 
Scougall, John, dairyman. High st 
Sharp, James, joiner, Butlerfield 
Sharp, Thomas, labourer, Leyden place 
Shearer,' Adam, dyer, 27 Lothian st 
Stirling, Jas., stoker, 15 Lothian st 
Stobbie, J. , paper maker, 29 Polton st 
Sibbald, John, joiner, Lothian st 
Simpson, Wm. , mason, 72 Dundas st 
Simpson, P., millworker, 13 Lothian st 
Simpson, Wm., bootmaker, High st 
Skelton, C, blacksmith, Lalhousie bridge 
Small, John, weaver, 47 Dundas st 
Small, Walter, carter. High st 
Small, Wm., Forrest pi 
Smith, James, engineer, Lothian st 
Smith, Mrs, Polton st 
Smith, W., labourer, 24 Polton st 
Smith, Wm., weaver, Viewforth pi 
Smith, John, joiner, 29 Polton st 
Smith, W. H., hairdresser, Polton st 
Sneddon, John, miner, 18 High st 
Suodgra-^s, Peter, farmer, Plopefield 
Somerville, W., & Co., glue manufacturers 
Sompwille. Walter, weaver 69 High st 
Sne:hlon, Mrs, dressmaker, Polton st 
Steven & Stoddart, builders, 47 High st 
Streitch, Wm., ropemaker, Poltouhall 



SteAvart, W., overseer, Dalhousie castle 
Stewart and Sharp, 43 High st 
Stott, Mrs Charles, High st 
Stoddart, Mrs, china niercht, Polton st 
Stoddart, James, 49 High st 
Straton, John, Lismore villa 

Tait, James, butcher, 44 High st 
Tait, James, dairyman, 64 High st 
Tait, John, draper, 3 High st 
Tait, Wm., weaver, 20 Dundas st 
Tliomson, T., joiner, 1 Ramsay cotts 
Tod, D. B., S.S.C, 79 High st 
Traill, Miss, milliner, 4 Polton st 
Trotter, Miss Margai-et, 102 High st 
Turnbull, James, farmei', Cockpen 
Turnbull, Robt., engineer, 58 Dundas st 
Turner, Wm., market gardener, Dalhousie 

Walker, John, miner, Lothian street 
Wallace, Rev. D. W. L. , Cockpen manse 
M'ardlaw, Mrs G., Maryheld villa 
Watson, Geo., miner, 68 Dundas st 
Watson, John, fireman, Lothian st 
Watson, G. R. , accountant, 50 Dundas st 
Watters, Wm., grocer, 3 Union park 
Webster, Thomas, El din pi 
Widnell, H., & Stewart, Limited., carpet 

manufacturers 
Williamson, J., mason, 90 High st 
Williamson, Robert, Polton st 
Wiison, Alex., weaver, 25 High st 
Wilson, John, carter, Polton st 
Wilson, John, gardener, 115 High st 
Wilson, Mrs James, 108 High st 
Wilson, Mrs, 28 Dundas st 
Wilson, Thomas, miner, 6 Durham bank 
Wilson, Wm., farmer, Dalhousie Chesters 
Wood, Mrs, Liverary cottage, 106 High st 
Wood, Miss, Newfield house 

Young, Henry, carter, Leyden place 
Young, John, millworker, Maryfield place 
Young, Mrs J., Ellen villa, Maryfield 
Young, W. , labourer, Leyden pi 
Yule, Mrs M., 74 Dundas st 



•^W 



,1 LIBRARY ■ I 

tc, .c=.y 



LASS WADE 



FosT Office — George Storie, postmaster. 

Deliveries— 7.30 a.m;12.30. aud 4.50 p.m. 

Despatches— Box closes at 10.20 a.m. 2.40. 5, and 7.40 p.m. 

Sundays — 9.10 a.m. (called for) ; despatch, 5.40 p.m. 

Commissioners of Police — Burgh of Lasswade. 

Geo. Porteous, provost; David M'Gill, and John Knowles, bailies; 

John Renwick, John Wilson, H. Grandison, r;. Gray, Wm. Flear, J. Shearer, and 

Thos. Chisholm. 

D. B. Tod, S.S.C, cle k. Robert Liddell, treasurer and collector. 

Lasswade Parish Council. 

Rev. J. A. Biirdon, Lassv^ade, chairman ; George Storie, A. Gilchris% J. GoMer, 

J. Scott, J. C. Purdie, Dr Falcone''. S. Milkr, J. Hamilton, T. Gargan, James H. 

Annandale, J. Gunn, Rev. J. Hunter and Rev. J. Loudon. 

Medical Officers — Dr C. J. Allan, Lasswade ; Dr Alison, Loanhead ; and Er 
W. Badger, Penicuik, for western district. P. Milne, inspector and collector. 

Lasswade School Board. 

Rev. Jas. A. Burdon, Lasswade, chairman ; R. T. Loudon, B. D. ; Rev. F. 

Hoban and James Scott, Loanhead ; James A, Hood, Rosewell ; K. Thynne, and 

C. Aitehison, Loanhead. Wm. Macfarlane, officer. C. K. Brown, clerk and treasurer. 

Gas Light Company — Frank Carlow, manager. 

Registrar — P. Milne; P. Goldie, Loanhead, assistant. 

Places of Worship — Established Church — Rev. James Burdon. 

United Presbyterian Church — Rev. W. P. Rodgerson. 
Scottish Episcopal Church, St Leonards— Rev. J. T. Collins. 
Holidays — Last Wednesday of every month. 



Ainslie, A., farmer, Gortonlee 

Ainslie,.Mrs, Calderwood Bank 

Aitken, George, grocer, etc. 

Aitken, Thos., dairyman 

Aitken, T. jun., contractor & coal agent 

Alexander, A., Grove end 

Allan, Dr Charles J., Oak mount 

Anderson, R. , gardener, Fountainbauk 

Archibald, Thos., Viewbank 

Arnot, John, Aveaver, Em row 

Bank of Scotland- -Geo. Malcolm, agent 

]5athgate, D., Rose cott 

Beattie, John, dairyman, Greenbank 

Bell, Joseph J., Broomieknowe ho 

Bisset, James, High st 

Black, Jas., railway porter 

Black, John, grocer, etc. 

Blaikie, James, millworker. West mill 

Blair, Mrs Rol>ert, baker, Bridgend 

Blair, Mrs, ladies' nurse 

Brown, Mrs George, Wadingburn 



Brai^ks, John, millwm'ker. Brae cott. 
Brown, Robert, Wadingburn 
Bryce, George, market gardener 
Burdon, Rev. J. A., Parish church manse 



Cameron, Mrs James, 

Cameron. D., station agent. Prospect bk. 

Carlow, Francis, mgr. Gas works 

Cathie, Mrs, tobacconist 

Cherry, Mrs, Avenue road 

Clark, Mrs, Elm row 

Collins, Rev. J. T., Broomieknowe 

Cornwall, Mrs, Broomieknowe 

Cowan, John, sexton. Elm row 

Craig, James, C.A., Glenord 

Crane, Wm., Fountainbauk 



Deas, Lady, Pittendreich 

Devvar, John, gamekeepei', Melville castle 

Dickson, Mrs, Myrtle villa, B'knowe 



Lassivade 



63 



Dods, Arch., Polton farm 
Donaldson, J., schoolmaster, John's cott. 
Donaldson, Mrs, Hawthornden Lodge 
Donaldson, Peter, gardener 
Drumniond, Sir James, Hawthornden 

w" Elliot, George, lodge-keeper, Eldin 



Falconer, Dr John, St Ann's 
I Fleming, Monnt Laws 

Flint, James, farmer. South Melville 
Foi\ler, W., Monnt Chatsie, Broom. ekn'e 
Fraser, Prof. A. Campbell, Gorton ho. 



Gaddie, Miss A. 

Gall, James, Leuchars Grove ct, B'knowe 

Galloway, Miss, dressmaker 

Geddes, Prof. , Crawford bank 

Gibson, John, carrier, Sunnyside cott 

Gilchrist, James, gardener, Middlemills 

Gilpin, Mrs, Eliza villa 

Goclley, Miss Margaret, newsagent 

Graham, Mrs, Hillside 

Grandison, Henry, painter 

Grainger, Jas., labourer 

Grant, Alexander, Hewan cottage 

Gray, George, tailor, 2 Eldin place 

Gray, John, janebauk 



Hogg, John, tailor and china merchant 

Hunter, David, blacksmith 

Hunter, Mrs, Lome cot. 

Hunter, Thomas, smith, Melville ter. 

Hutchison, James, plumler 



Johnston, Alf., Rarnetbank 
Johnston, Piobert, Woodside 
Johnstone, Lady, Beechpark 



Kerr, Adam, constable, police station 
Kerr, George, millworker, Bridgend 
Kidd, Miss Pringle, Lasswade bank 
King, Andrew, contractor 
Kirkhope, Jas. , store manager, Polton 
Knowles, John, mason 

Laidlaw, Wm., millworker, Polton road 

Lamb, A., Beaconsfield 

Lawrie, Alex,, papermsker, Hillside 



LIDDELL, R., painter — see aclvt. 
Lawson, John, miner 
Lothian, A., painter, Polton rd. 
Lowe, James, gardener, Oakmount 
Lowson, J. G. Flowerdew, Hollycot 

M'Donald, Miss, Argyle cot. 

M 'Donald, Miss, East mains 

M'Donald, Mrs George, Argyle cot. 

M'Donald, P. and M., High st 

M'Gill, David, grocer 

M'Intosh, Thos., Old bank buildings 

M'Kinlay,Miss, East mains 

M'Kinnon, G., gardener. Melville castle 

Malcolm, Geo., bank agent 

Malcolm, Robert, Wadingbu n 

Marshall, Mrs, dressmaker 

Marshall, Robert, schoolmaster 

Masterton, James, Back row 

Matheson, Mrs John, boot and shoe maker 

Maxwell, Thomas, High st 

Meldrum, William, joiner 

Melrose, Mrs, Woodside, Polton road 

Melville, Viscount, Melville castle 

Millar, Wm. White, S.S.C, Dunesk 

Millar, David, plasterer 

Millar, Miss, 4 Springbank 

Milne, John, joiner 

Milne, John K., Kevock tower 

Milne, Peter, inspector of poor 

Mitchell, Alex., Beechacre 

Moffat, Henry, of Eldin 

Moore, Wm., manager, St Leonards 

Morrison, W., Victoria cot. , B'm'knowne 

Mossman, Robert, Annfield 

Muir, Adam, weaver, Glen cot. 

Muirhead, R. , Cameron cot. , B'knowe 

Mutter, Misses, the Ehns, B'knowe 



Naples, John, cropper, Old toll 
Neilson, Robt. , Polton rd 
Nisbet, Alex,, weaver, Elm row 
Noble, Alex, flesher 



Parsons, Miss,Calderwood villa 
Paterson, George, gardener. West mill 
Paterson, Miss A., Eskdale cot. 
Peden, Robert, carter 
Peddie, James, Elmbank 
Porter, Stuart, plumber 
Potts, G. H., painter, Fettes mount 
Proudfoot, William, fireman 
Purves, Mrs, Esk Tower 



54: 



Lasswade 



Rie, John, market gardener, Linden cot. 
Raniage. Mis.s, J., Eckford not. B'knowe 
Rmkine, Wm., Polton rd 
Reid, David, joiner and ini'lertaker 
Renwick, John, paperniaker, Ehn row 
Rintoul, Mis^, teacher, 2 Elm row 
Robertson, Walter, hairdresser 
Robinson, Jn., designer, Bank ho 
Rodgerson, Rev. W. P., Polton road 
Ross, Alexander, Hawthornden station 
Ross, David, plumber and gasfitter 
Ross, D. jr., plumber 
Ross, Thomas, painter, Bridgend 
Runciman, Mrs, Polton road 



Scott, Misses, Grove End, B'knowe 

Simpson, David, gardener 

Simpson, Robert, butcher and poulterer 

Sinclair, Mrs, Elm row 

Smith, Mrs, Hilton cot., Hillhead 

Smith, J. D., Greenfield lodge 

Stebbing, Mrs, greengrocer 

Steuart," Archibald, Mount Esk 

Stewart, F. F., pharmaceutical chemist 

Stewart, John, cabhirer, Springbank 

Stewart, J. G., Diinraven, Broomiekuowe 

Sbewai-t, Mrs Geo , Thorn hill 

Stewart, W. L., Thornhill 

Sfcoldart, John, Calderwood bank 



Stirling, Mrs, West Woodbine cot. 
Storie, George, bookseller, Post office 
Swan, James, gardener 

Thomson, John, bootmaker 
Thomson. Mrs Geo, Elm row 
Thomson T., gardener. Elm row 
Tod, D. B., Viewforth, Bi'oomieknowe 
Tod, John, papermakei", St L,eonards 
Tod, J. & Son, St Leonards paper mill 
Tod, W. L., paper maker, Lasswade cot. 
Tod, W. N., St Leonards 
Torrance, Arch. P., Viewfield 
Tough, R. B., Laureldean 

Waterson, Charles, millworker 
Watson, Wrn., contractor, Woodfield 
Webster, Thomas, Quarryhead house 
White, Mrs R., Kevock 
Wight, T. , blacksmith and ironmonger 
Wight, Robt., gardener. Fountain bank 
Wilson, A., gardener, Polton rd 
Wilson, John, baker 
Woodbridge, Mrs Henry, Elm row 
Woodhe.id, Thos. , Mavisbank Lodge 

Young, Htiury, Eldin place 



POLTON 



Annandale k Son, Ltd., papermakers 

Annandale, Jas. H., Polton vale 

Archibald, Robt., gatekeeper, Springfield 

Armstrong, Richard, Polton paper mill 

Barclay, Wm., paperniaker 

Blaikie, John, miniger, S^ningfield Mill 

Bremner, Alex., guard 

Cimpbell, Daniel, engineer 

Clapperton, Thomas, carter 

Clough, C. T., St Ann's mount 

Dickson, John, s.nith 

Duncan, David, smith 

Garry, John, Poltonb.mk 

Gray, John, cashier, Polton mill 

Hall, Wm., engineer 

Henderrion, Wm., engineer, Poltonbank 

L^eland, Wm., M.D., Mavisbush 

Irvine, Richard, plumber 



Lsles, W. J. H., clerk, Springfield 

Jack, Abram, paperniaker 

Jardine, Alex,, papernraker 

Jardine, Jas , papermaker 

Johnston, John, Polton cott. 

Johnston, Alex., engineer, Springfield 

King, Arch., fireman 

Kirkhope, Jas., postmaster, the Store 

Msbet, Thos. , plumber, Polton mill 

Renwick, John, mason 

Ross, John, millworker 

Smith, George, painter 

Thomson, Alex., paperniaker 

Thomson, Jas., papermaker 

Thomson, John, engineer 

Thomson, Thomas, millworker 

Tod, W. junior, & Co., Springfield milh 

Wilson, James, machineman 



LOANH EAD 

FosT Office — John Steplieii, postmaster. 
Deliveries — 7.30 a.m.; 2.20 and 5.30 p.m. ; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. (called foi)- 
Despatches— 8.20 and 11 a.m., 2.20 and 8.20 p.m. Sundays, 4.45 p.m. 

Commissioners. 
jl John Gunn. piovo.st; S. Craig, and James Sclater, bailies; J. C. Purdie, M. Frichel, 
C. K. Brown, Hugh Kerr, W. Buchanan, and Patrick Nugent. 

William Macfarlane, clerk and collector to Comissioners ; Dr Allison, medical officer- 
J. Dickson, sanitary officer. 
% Meetings on Second Mondaj^ ol each Month at Garfield cottage. 

School Board — See under Lasswade, p. 52. 

Places of Worship. 
Parish Church — Rev. Alexander Stewart. Free Church- Rev Vv"m. Johnston, B.D. 
Reformed Presbyterian Church— Rev. J. C. Gregg. Roman Catholic Church — 

(St Margaret's) — Rev. Frederick Hoban. United Presbyterian Church — Rev. D. 

Sutherland. 

British Linen Company's Bank — John Williamson, agent. 

St Leonard's Lodge, No. 580, Loanhead and Lasswade, 
Meets on the First 'ihursday of every month, at 8 p.m. Bro. W. Connor, 

R.W.M. ; C. K. Brown, P.M.; Geo. Affleck, J. P.M. ; P. Gennon, S.W. ; J. 
Kirkpatrick, J.W.; W. Hall, S.M.; J. C. Purdie, treasurer; \V. E. Hamilton, 
secretary; W. M'Farlane, chaplain. 

Conservative Association, Instituted 1886. 
Charles K. Brown, chairman ; P. Goldie, secretary and treasurer. 

Liberal Committee — Parish of Lasswade. 
J. Williamson, chairman ; John Hope and John Golder, Secretaries. 

Bowling Club. 
P John Williamson, president; William Hamilton, vice-president; James Kemp, 
secretary. 

Independent Order of Good Templars. 
The " Bright and Morning Star" Lodge, No. 418, meets in the Public School every 
1 Wednesday evening at 7.45, D. Torrance, C.T. ; E. Tweedale, Secretary. 
The "Mavis" Juvenile Temple meets at 6.30 p.m., Wm. Hyslop, Jun., Supt. 

RossLTN Castle Lodge, No 2185, A.O. Shepherds, meets in School-Room 
every alternate Thursday at 7 p.m. Secretary, J. Crawford; Treas, A. Wilson. 

Court Pride of Mid-Lothian Foresters. 

Meets on Tuesday (fortnightly). Thomas King, C.R.; John Black, High 

street, secretary ; W. Hunter, 22 High street, treasurer. 

Loanhead Benevolent Society. 
Meets on the Second Saturday of each month. W. Hunter, president ; G. Young 
secretary ; G. Allan, treasurer. 

Olive Lodge of Free Gardeners, 
Meets on the First Saturday of each month. J, F.-rguson, R.W. M. ; James King, 
treasurer ; George Young, secretary. 

Irish National Foresters. 
Patrick Nugent, chief ranger. 



56 



Loanhead 



Affleck, Geo , 80 High st 

Affleck, Miss, 30 Clerk Street 

Ainslif^ J., fLinner, Hillend, Lothian burn 

AITCHISOX & Co., engineers — see advt 

Aitchison, (_'., Elmswood 

Aitchison, Miss, Behnont 

Alexander, John, cliiiri merchant, Loan 

Alexander, James batcher. Loan 

Alison, F, Mayshadc cott 

Allison, Alexander, M. D. , Bilston bank 

Allison, John, bootmaker, 99 Clerk st. 

Anderson, Jas., 12 Burghlee ter 

Armour, Daniel, clothier, West end 

Annonr, Jim;s, muiager, ipjiens works 

Arthur, Johu, grocer, et?., 5 Clerk st. 

Auldjo, L., 1 Clerk st 



Baillie, Andrew, coach hirer. Fountain 

Bamberry, C, Ashfield pi 

Beveridge, Mrs, I'horn ea 

Black, Alex., dairy. nan, J^dayburn ter 

Black, Mrs, 4 Flower sl^. 

Bourhill, Thos., cirter, 10 Linden pi. 

Brodie, James, Elm grove 

!-• rooks James, carter, Mavisbank lodge 

British Linen Co.'s Bank, Clerk st. 

Black, John, joiner, 28 Hig ^'t. 

BRO'vVX, C. K., & SONS,\v esale and 
retail wine and .spirit merciants, and 
family grocer.3, 17 High st. — -see, advt. 

Brown, Crawford, slater, 29 High st. 

Brown, Mrs, 68 Hig^- st. 

Buchanan, Wm., -±5 Fountain pi. 

Byers, Henry, miner, 4 Lamb pi 

Cadzow, Wm., engineraan, Loan 
Cairns, John, blacksmith, 15 Clerk st. 
Cameron, J., M.D., Hawthorn gdns 
Campbell, John, butcher, 18 High st. 
Campbell, Mrs., milliner, 90 Clerk st 
Carstiirs, T., gardener, Loan 
C lirns, John, miner, 3 Fowler sq. 
Cesiford, Jas., grocer, etc., 2 High st. 
Cliayne, C. , Fount cott 
Clipperton, Jas., grower etc., 51 Clerk st. 
Clappert)n, Thomis, slater 
Clark, Wai., miner, 23 Church st. 
Clippens Oil Co. (Ltd.), ^^traiton works 
Collins, \V., stitionmister 
Co-opjrati/e Store (Penicuik), Clerk st. 
Corm Lck, Miss, Arlnithnot rd. 
Couston, T., teacher, Burdiehouse 
Craig, Mrs, 8 Fowler sq. 



Cossar, W. , miner, Mayfield pi 

Craig, Mrs, 43 Church st. 

Craig Simuel, joiner, 26 High st. 

Crawford, Jas., Muirfield pi 

Crooks, James, draper, Arbuthnot rd. 

Crookston, Mrs. Station rd. 

Crookston, W., china mereht., Station rd 
Cunningham, Mrs, 8 Lindeii pi. 
Cushnie, Mrs, draper etc., 20 High st. 

Dalgleish, C. , tramway stables, 41 High st. 
Davidson, R., 30 Church st 
Davie, Mrs, 2 Linden place 
Davie, Wm., builder, Linden pi 
Deans, Geo., miner, 22 Church st 
Deans, Mrs, 79 High st. 
Dickie, J. T., M.li., Fountain 
Dickson, A., roadman. Church st 
Dickson, John, Hawthorn gdns. 
Dickson, C, Mansfield villa 
Dickson, C, & Son, tallow merchants 
Dickson, James, farmer, Damhead 
Dickson, Johu, smith, 3 Dryden pi. 
Dingwall, Mrs, 29 Church st. 
Dobson, William, draper, 48 Clerk st 
Docherty, Peter, grocer, etc. , 70 High st 
Docherty, John, 22 Fountain pi. 
Douglas, J. G., joiner. Fount cottage 
Drysdale, R., 1 Fountain pi 
Duncan, John, Burghlee ter 
Duncan, Jas., mason, B)urghlee terrace 
Dunlop, Alex., baker, 67 Clerk st. 

Faulds, A,, Clerk st. 
Ferguson, Mrs, 33 Church st. 
Fleming, Mrs, Thistle cott 
Forrest, Mrs, Linden cott 
Frichael, Michael, joiner, Kirkview 
Gaddie, Mrs, grocer, 59 Clerk st. 
Geddes Bros., grocers, etc., 3 J Hign sr. 
Geddes, W., tailor, 70 Clerk st. 
Gibbous, P., labourer, New Pentland 
Gillespie, Hay, clerk, Stra in cottage 
Glover, Jas., plumber. High st 
Glover, John, 5 Fountain pi. 
Godley, John, tailor. Loan 
Golder, John, draper, 58 Clerk st 
Goldie, Patrick, clerk, Church st. 
Gourlay, Geo., blacksmith, 46 High st. 
Gourlay, John, brickmiker Mayfield 
Gourlay, R., papsrmaker, D.yden pi 
Irourlay, Wm., gardener, Bilston lodge 
Iray, T. T., William vilie, Pentland 
G.'ay, John, Eilangowan, Straiton 



Loanhead 



57 



Haddow, J., Marjory bank 
Hannah, R. G. , cashier, the Loan 
Hamilton, J. D.,. joiner, 50 High st. 
Hamilton, W. E., cashier, Shotts' Co. 
Hardie, Peter, baker, Downie pi 
Hay, Wm., grocer, 83 Clerk st 

§ Hoban, Rev. Frederick 

Hogg, Wni., plumber, Grove cottages 
Hope, Wni., mason, High st. 
Hughes, Jas. , watchmaker, 74 Clerk st 
Hughes, J., platelayer, Foundry lane 

i Hunter, J. M' Vicar, Rodons 

Hunter, Jno. , butcher, 89 Clerk st 
Hunter, William, 42 High st.. 
Hunter, Wra., baker. Loan 
Hunter, Wm, carter, Oakfieldj 
Hunter, Wm. , labourer, 22 High st. 
Hutchison, Thos., farmer, Broomhills 
Hutchison, W^m., farmer, Burghlee 
Hyslop, Wm., stationer, 75 Clerk st 



Inglis, Henry, draper, 15 Loan 

Jack, Abraham, miner, Oak cottage 

Jack, George, 31 Clerk st. 

Jack, J., fancy warehouse, 2 Church st. 

Jack, Jas., Grove cottage 

Jamieson, Misses, Hawthorn gardens 

Johnston, Rev. Wm., Free church manse 

Johnstone, Mrs, Nessieville 



Kay, Wm., plumber, Flowerfield 
Keilie, J., Fount cott 
Kerr, Hugh, baker, 119 Clerk st. 
♦ King, John, mason, Burghlee ter. 
King, Robert, miner, 111 Clerk st. 
King, T. , millworker, Burghlee ter. 
Knox , George, 27 Chnrcli st 

Laidlaw, Alexander, engineer, Nesslee 
Lamb, James, grocer, 27 Clerk st 
Lamb, T. W., mgr. Co-operative store 
Lamb, W^m., Clerk st. 
Leadbetter, James, R. P. manse 
Leadbetter, Jas., papermaker. Fowler so. 
Leitch, Mrs Robert, Dryden pi 
Liddle, W,, restaurant, 72 Clerk st. 
Lindsay, James, Drydenbank 
Love, J., colliery manager, Lynedoch cot. 
Loanhead Gas Co. Ltd — J. Tnlioch, mffr. 
Loanhead .New Public Hall Co., Clerk 

st. — J. Williamson, factor 
Logan. Alex. , engineman, 2 Station rd 



M'Call, John, farmer, Loanhead farm 
M'Farlane, Wm., Garfield cottages 
M'Gregor, Thomas, stonecutter. Church st 
M'Kenzie, Miss, Loan cottage 
M'Kinnon, R. A., teacher, Linden Lodge 
M'Lean, J., Dryden cott ■ 
M'Lennan, John, cooper, Mayburn ter. 
M'JSTeil, Mrs George, 45 Church st. 
M 'Queen, And., Avaiter, 7 High st 
M 'Queen, James, fireman, 9 Fowler sq. 
M 'Queen, Mrs., Foresters' Arms, Clerk st 
Marshall, Thomas, station agent, Polton 
Mavisbank Private Lunatic Asylum — Dr 

Wilson, resident phy.sician 
May, R. , 7 Fountain pi 
Melville, Thomas, mason. Swan cot. 
Milner, Mrs John, 12 High st. 



Neill, J. T., grocer, 88 Clerk st 
Nugent, Patrick, grocer, 24 Clerk st 



Prentice, B., gardener, 61 High st. 
Proctor, John, Burdiehouse mains 
Purdie, John C, painter, 21-23 High st 



Ramage, Robt., dairyman, 60 Clerk st, 
Reid, George, Station road 
Reiily, Thos.", Swan villa 
Robertson, A., stationer. Clerk st. 
Robson, Thomas, Woodvdlle 
Roden, Patrick, grocer, Staiton rd 
Russel, Inspector, Constabulary station 

Sclater, Andrew, contractor, Clerk st. 

Sclater, James, farmer, Townhead 

Sclater, Mrs, Engine road 

Sclater, John, ploughman, 47 Clerk st. 

Scott, John, watchmaker, 91 Clerk st 

Scott, James, tailor, 94 Clerk st. 

Sharpe, David, hairdresser, etc., Loan 

Sharp, G. , china merchant, 68 Clerk st. 

Sharp, Mrs A., 42 High st. 

Shotts Iron Company (Ltd) Coal and Iron 

Works 
Simpson, J., millworker, 6 Dryden pi. 
Simpson, John, grocer, Fountain pi. 
Simpson k Noble, butchers, 
Simpsnn, Wm.. bootmaker, 89 Clerk st. 
Scott, John, Williamville New Pentland 



5S 



Loanhead 



Sinton, R. T., saddler, 101 Clerk st 
Smith, Mrs, confectioner, 107 Clerk st 
Spence, Wm., gardener, Dryden bank 
Stephen, John, chemist, dentist, and 

postmaster, 73 Clerk st. 
Steven, Robert, tailor, The Loan 
Stewart, John, mason, 29 Church st, 
Stewart, John, moulder, 2 Dryden pi. 
Stewart, Rev. Alex., (E.C.), The Manse 
Stewart, W., pitheadman, 4 Dryden pi. 
Stirling, R. , builder, Logan bank cot. 
Stodart, John, Helen villa 



Telfer, Mrs John, grocer, 30 High st. 
Telfer, John, labourer. High st 
Thomson, Geo., Charlotte villa 
Thomson, Mrs, 82 Clerk st. 
Thomson, Jas, miner. Church st 
Thomson, J. M., Hazelbank 
Thomson, John, clothier, 3 High st. 
Thomson, Wm., carter, 6 Fowler sq, 
Thynne, K. , farmer, Pentland mains 
Torrance, E., Sylvan pi 
Train, Geo., mason, Govanlock cottage 
Train, Joseph, joiner, 54 Clerk st. 
Tweeddale, Miss, nurse, 85 Clerk st. 



Veitch, James, Oakville 

yeitch, Mrs, merchant, Burdiehouse 



Watson, Andrew, miner, Downie pi. 
Watson, Mrs, Eiien cott. 
\\':itson, John, miner, Church st 
Watson, Wm., builder, Arbutlmot road 
Watt, John F., 72 High st._ 
Webster, D., Biirdiehou.se limeworks 
Webster, A., ploughman, Foundry lane 
White, J,, farmer, Edgefield 
Williams, Mrs John, 35 High st. 
Williamson, Robert, slater, Clerk st. 
W^illiamson, Wm., slater, 31 Church st. 
Williamson, John, agent B. L. Co. bank 
Wilson, Andrew, contractor, Engine road 
Wilson, A., the Loan 
Wilson, James, joiner, Straiton 
Williams, D., miner, Elm grove 
Wood, Mrs, 3 Dryden pi 
Wright, J., engineer, Medwyn cott. 
Wright, Geo., Loan 

Young, David, miner. High st. 
Young, John, conti'actor. Elm cottages 
Young, John, ironmonger, 78 Clerk st. 
Young, Mrs, grocer, Burdiehouse 
Young, Wm., dairyman. New Pentland 
Yule, Robert, Linden pi 



-^S' 



'^ 



GILM ERTON 

Post Office — Mrs E. Thomson, postmistress. 
Deliveries — 7 a.m.; 3.10, 5.30 and p.m. Despatches — 11.5, 3.10, and 8.55 p.m. 

Independent Order of Good Templaks. 
Guthrie Lodge No. 809. -Was instituted in October 1884. Meetings are held 
in the New Hall, Gilmerton, every Wednesday evening at 7.30. Wm. Henderson. 
The Venture Fair (Juvenile) Lodge, meets in the same hall an hour earlier 

Drum Birds Football Club. — President, James Robertson. Secretary, H. Mitchell. 



Affleck, James, mason, 7 Nisbett's cotts. 
Aitken, Wm., smith, Smithy green 
Allan, G., miner, Cuthbertson's buildings 
Anderson, Thos., dairyman 
Baxter, J, dairyman 



Bennett, Miss, Edmonstone school house 
Borrowman, John, Hay cottage 
Crookston, Adam, 6 Hawthorn pi 
Cuthbertson, Henry, grocer 
Christie, Rev. Jas., D.D. Manse 



Gilmerton 



59 



Carstairs, C, ploughman, Drum st 

Denholm, Tlios., coal merchant, Drum st, 

Dow, William, Medway cot. 

Dow, Wm., jr.. Bonny view 

Edgar, A. L., Gilmertoii House 

Edward, Robert C. , gardener 
I Forrest, T, Rose cot. 

Foster, H. E. Limefield cot. 

Foulton, George. Junes bldgs 

Flockhart, Thos., miner, New st 

Gardner, Adam, farmer, Melville grange 
^ Gibb, Peter, miner. Drum st 

Gordon, Thos., miner, Hawthorn place 

Goschen, Geo., dairyman 

Graham, John, & Son, butchers 

Grandison, P., miner, 16 Hawthorn place 

Griffin, H. E., Bankhouse 

Grossert, Wm., blacksmith 

Hastie, Wm., dairyman 

Henderson, Jas., dairyman, Bruce's bigs. 

Hill, D., supt., convalescent home 

Home, Oswald, grocer 

Hunter, J. , ploughman, South farm 

Hunter, Wm., labourer, Tafts 

Hutchinson, Alexander, labourer, New st 

Hutchinson, J., miner, Newst 

Innes, David, coal merchant 

Innes, Geo., Rosebank 

Innes, Mrs Ann, Cove house 

Innes, Robert, coal merchant 

Innes, Thomas, horse dealer 
k Innes, W. , coal merchant, Maryfield cot. 

* Institute Reading-Room 
King, Mrs, Ravenscroft 

Keddie, John, engineman, Ravenscroft 
Kinnear, T., plasterer, Hawthorn place 

# Kerr, John, baker 

King, John, roadman, Bruce's bldgs. 
Lidclle, Peter, quarryman, Bruce's land 
Laidlaw, R., dairyman 
Ledingham, W, Drum st 
Love, Miss R. , Ravenscroft place 
M'Donald, George, miner. New st 
M'Donald, William, miner, Rae's bldgs 
M'Gill, C, tailor, Wright's buildings 
M'Gill, John, miner, Tafts 
M'Neill, Wm., miner. Drum lodge 
M'Meekin. J, dairyman 
Meek, Miss Elizabeth, dressmaker 
Middleton, Thos., miner, Drum st 
Mitchell, C., dairyman, West end 
Mitchell, v., publican 
Mitchell Mrs, Viewbank, New st 
Montgomery, G,, schoolhouse 
M'Gregor, Mrs, grocer 



Nisbet, John More, Drum house 
Penman, D., & Son, grocers, etc. 
Penman, T., quarrymaster, Hawthon pi 
Pentland, Jane, dressmaker. Drum st 
Peutland, Wm. , roadsman, Innes bldgs 

Redpath, David, Drum st 

Redpath, Miss, Bank house 

Reilly, W. H., draper 

Ritchie, Jas., joiner, Edward's bldgs. 

Ritchie, Thomas, gardener 

Robertson, Alex. , checker, Liberfcon dams 

Robertson, Andrew, miner, Brucefield pi. 

Robertson, Robert, slater and plasterer 

R )ss, David, Rosebank 

Russell, James, miner, Innes' bldgs 

Sharp, Mrs, Ravenscroft pi. 

Shaw, Robert, dairyman 

Shortrede, Miss, children's convalescent 

home 
Scott, P., ploughman. Drum gate 
Skirving, Jas., engineman. New st 
Smith, Alfred, publican, Drum st 
Smith, Wm., coachman. Hawthorn pi 
Smith, Wm., surfaceman. Drum st 
Stewart, Miss, schoolhouse 
Suttie, Jas. , newsagent. Hawthorn pi 
Symons, Mrs, Rockville cot. 

Tarbet, David signalman 
Thomson, Mrs E. general merchant, P. 0. 
Twiss, John, restaurant keeper 
Taylor, Mrs, Rose cot, 

Veitch, James, baker and confectioner 

Walker, James, miner 

Watson, Robt., dairj'^man 

Wighton, John, 14 Innes' bldgs 

Williams, James, baker 

Williams, John, baker, Rosebank 

Williamson, Alex., dairyman, West edge. 

Wilson, John, joiner. Smithy green 

Wilson, Thomas, miner, Smellie's cots 

Williamson, Geo. , grocer 

Wright, John, joiner, Wright's bldg 

Young, George, boot and shoe maker 



60 



Roseivell 



ROSEWELL 

Post Office — Jas. Suith, postmaster. 

Deliveries — 8.15 a.m. and 5.20 p.m.; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. (called foi). 

Despatches — 10.30, 3 and 7.50 p.m.; Sundays, 5.30 p.m. 



Anderson, J., tailor, Saugherie cott. 
Brockley, Robt. M., farmer, Gourlaw 
Fortune, James, gamekeeper, Whitehill 
Gillespie, D., engineer, Whitehill colliery 
Grant, Jas., manager, Co-operative store 
Hamilton, J., mngr, Whitehill colliery 
Hood,A.,Lot-hian Coal Co. Ltd., Whitehill 
Hood, James A., Rosedale 
Hunter, Rev. John, B. D. , The Manse 
Laing, Gordon, dairyman 
Lamb, Jas., blacksmith 
Leyden, John, gardner, Whitehill 
Lothian Coal Co. Ltd., Whitehill pits 



Mid-Lothian and Peebles District Asylum 
Mitchell, Dr, District Asylum 
Nelson, David, teacher. Public school 
Plenderleith, Alex., farmer, Brotchrigg 
Plenderleith, W., farmer, Rosewell mains 
Ramsay, R. (\ W., Whitehill 
Simpson, James, underground manager 
Sinclair, Peter, shoemaker 
Tait, James, butcher 
White, Thomas, farmer, Newbigging 
Wilson, Alexander, joiner 
AVilson, S., farmer, Shewington 



ROSLIN 

Post Office — George Bryce, postmaster. 

Deliveries — 7.30 a.m. and 5.30 p.m.; Sundays, 9.15 to 10 a.m. (called for). 

Despatches — 11; 2.15, and 8 p.m.; Sundays, 4.45 p.m. 



Affleck, C, miner 

Aitken, Joseph, Douglas pi 

Allan, James, miner 

Armour, Matthew, tuner, Dryden pi. 

Bain, John, mason, Williamville 
Banks, Robert, powdermaker 
Barnetson, Rev. David, F.C. manse 
Bernard, John, miner, Ray's buildings 
Bernard, R., miner, Irvine pi. 
Black, James, smith, Howgate 
Bruce, George, joiner, Howgate 
Bryce, Geo. , millwright and postmaster 
Buchanan, T., dairykeeper, Rosslynlee 

Calder, Mrs, Creelha' 
Can, Mrs A. P., The Thicket 
Charles, H. H. W., Graham's cot. 
Co-operative Store Co. (Penicuik branch) 
Crawford, Alex., farmer, Slatebarns 
Cunningham, John T., dentist. Hillside 
Cunningham, William, Pentland grove 
Cuthbertson, Wm. , weaver, Dryden pi. 

Davie, George, miner, Stanley pi. 
Duncan, And., joiner, Dryden pi. 
Easton, James, weaver, Simpson's bigs. 
Edgar, John, farmer, Kirkettle 



Fairley, John, fireman, Nisbet pi. 
Finlay, Allan, weaver, Mansfield cott. 
Forbes, J. G., Seafield house 
Forrest, D., platelayer, Dryden pi. 
Francis, Capt., Firth house 
French, Walter, miner 

Gardner, Daniel, farmer, Langhill 
Gargan, Thomas, joiner and undertaker 
Gilmonr, James, powdermaker 
Gray, Miss, teacher, Public school 

Haig, Alex, Nisbet pi. 

Haig, David, powder maker 

Hannah, James, powdermaker 

Hargreaves, A. F., chemist 

Hargreaves, T. A., organist 

narrower, Bruce, weaver, Dryden pi. 

Hay, Merricks & Co. (Ltd. ), powder makers 

Henderson. A., powdermaker 

Herd, John, Douglas pi 

Hogg. John, miner 

Hyde, H. , Douglas pi 

Irvine, James, miner 
Jack, Miss, milliner 
Johnston, W., blacksmith 
Johnston, Miss, grocer 



Mosllt 



in 



61 



Judge, John, grocer, etc. 

Kellock, Alex., fai-mer, Oatslie 

Kerr, John, baker 

Law, David M., joiner and undertaker 

Law, Miss, Alelville villa 

Livie, David, Co-oper,itive Store 

Lorinier, Charles, stationmaster 

tt Lothian, John, labourer, Ray's bl^.jo. 
Loudon, Rev. Joseph, E.C. uiauso 
l^L 'Dougal, Mrs, Mount Pleasant 
M'Lachlan, A., Leewood 

a M'ljeunan, Mrs Alex., Dryden cott. 

' Millar, Alf., Bellevue 

Millar, James, Violet grove 
Mitchell, John, gardener, Woodhouselee 
Mociirie, And., bootmaker, Dryden pi. 
Moiatt, J., Cainetny view- 
Morgan, John, joiner, Simpson's pi. 
Neiil, John, labourer, Janelield cott. 
Neill, S., powdermaker, Nisbet pi. 
Neill, T., Roslin form 
Nelson, Peter, weaver, Dryden pi 
Niven, James, farmer, Dryden mains 
Noble, James, farmer, Howgate 
Old, David, cooper, Douglas pi 
Old, Wm,, powdermaker, Dryden pi. 
Pate, Robert, farmer, Cr>^sshouse 
Patersjn, David, F.C.S, Leabank ho. 
Patcrson, James, Lcebank liouse 
Paterson, Wm., Glen side cotts. 
Pringle, Mark, innkeeper 
Richardson, A., signalman, Nisbet pi. 

1^ Richardson, John, smith, Station road 
Richardson, Robt. , weaver 
Ramage, James, weaver, Irvine pi. 
Robertson, John, weaver, the Glen 
Robertson, Walter, miner, Ray's bigs. 
Roger^ J,, Rosslyn castle station 



Ross, Miss, Isla bank 
Sanders, Thomas, cooper 
Scott, George, mason, Dryden pi. 
Simpson, Geo., Irvine place 
Simpson, James, Rosemount villa 
Smith, Brunton, checker 
Smith, David, Woodend cott. 
Smith, Wm., miner, 3 Stanley pi. 
Soltenborn, Carl, Royal hotel 
Stewart, William, hreman 
Stoddart, Mrs Alex., Ray's bigs. 
Stow, Alfred, Ashville cott. 
Strachan, Mrs, Nisbet pi. 
Strong, Rev. W. B. , Glencorse manse 
Swan, John, farmer, Easter bush 
Thomson, Charles, powdermaker 
Thomson, Thos., keeper, Roslin chapel 
Thompson, Rev. John, the parsonage 
Tod, John W., Rosebank ho 
Tolmie, Wm., engineman, Nisbet pi. 
Tolmie, William, M'Kcnzie bank 
Torrance, Mrs, Mansheld cott. 
Trotter, A. C, 

Turnbull. William, mason, Marion cott. 
Waldie, Richard, gardener 
Walker, Alf. H., BiUon inn 
Wallace, William, miner, Simpson pi. 
Watson, William, Douglas cott. 
Watson, William, farmer, Moat 
White, Mrs, Woodfield 
Whitetield, D. , pitheadman 
White, Edw. A., teacher. Public school 
Widnell, H., & Stewart, carpet manufs. 
Wilsun, Alex., overseer, Dryden pi. 
Wilson, Miss, dressmaker, Douglas cott. 
Wright, David, labourer, Ray's bigs. 
Wright, John, baker and confectioner 
Wright, Thomas W., butcher 

MILTON BRIDGE & GREENLAW. ' 



Alexander, Geo., carrier. Fishers' tryst 
Bertram, A. G., schoolmaster, (ilencorse 
Birkleck, Major. Auchendinny house 
Blaikie, Mrs, Milton bridge 
Cook, H., Bd^ood 

Cowan, James, Auchendinny mill house 
Cowan, Sir Jolin, of Beeslack 
Crooks, J., Bel wood Dairy 
Dolby, Major, Glencorse barracks 
Fowler, Wm., mason, Auchindinny 
Grant, James, grocer, Auchendinny 
Harding, Frank, clerk, Milton mill 
Henderson, J., spirit dealer, Auchendinny 
Inglis, Alex. W., Logaubank 



Kelly, James, Logan brae 
Lamb, D., Auchendinny 
Lindsay, J., blacksmith, Auchendinny 
Martin, John, miller, Milton mill 
Morton, J., Glencorse mains 
Munro, J, farmer, New Milton 
M'Oance, H. C, Mauricewood 
Scott, Jas., stationmaster, Glencorse 
Smith, Wm., bottler, Milton bank 
Somerville, H. (W. S. & Son), Dalmore 
Somerville, W., & Son, Dalmore mill 
Tennant, Geo., station-ag't, Auchendinny 
Turner, G., barrack- =ergt., Glencorse 
Webster, Miss A. L. , post- mistress 



PENICUIK 



Post Office — Wm. Howden, postmaster. 

Deliveries — 8 a.m., 2.45 and 6.25 p.m.; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m (called for). 

Despatches— 8.30 and 11. c5 a.m., 2.40, 5.15, 6, and 7 30 p m. ; Sundays, 5.20 p.m. 

Commissioners of Police. 

C. W. Cowan, provost ; Andrew G. Wilson and Wm. A. Thomson, bailies. 

A. Cowan, G. Ewart A. Brown, T. H. Welsh, C. Wilson, and A. L. Tait. 

Dr Badger, medical officer. George Badger, clerk. 

Peter M'Gregor, treasurer and collector. 

School Board. 

C. Buchanan, chairman ; Alex. Cowan, 1. Dent, R. C. Cowan, A. Brown, J. Fleming, 

and E. Henderson. George Badger, clerk and treasurer. 

Parish Council. 
C. W. Cowan, chairman ; R. J. Henderson, vice-chairman. 
George Badger, inspector and collector. 
Places of Worship. 
Established Church— Rev. Robert Thomson, M.A., B.D. Free Church— Rev. R. 
T. Jack, M.A. United Presbyt Brian Churches — Penicuik — Rev J. M'Kerrow, B.A. ; 
Howgate- Rev. D. Thomas, M.A. Episcopal Church — Rev. C. Elrington. Roman 
Catholic Church— Rev. Father M'llTamara. 

Medical Practitioners. 
Dr William Badger, Dr Geo. Melville, Dr Alex. Naismitli. 



Abernethy, Mrs, confectioner, 22 Bridge st 
At ernethy, James, farmer, Howgate 
Abernethy, Peter, joiner, Dalrymple place 
Ainslie, Thomas, Lynmore 
Aikman, A., Pryde's pi 
Alexantler, James, Valleyfield road 
Anderson, James, agent Clydesdale bank 
Armstrong, R,, miUworker, 47 John st 
Arthur, Geo., I Valkyfield rd 
Badger, Geo., inspector of poor, etc. 
Badger, Wm., physician, Carnethy 
Badger, Mrs Robert, Burnbrae 
Baillie, Mrs John, farmer, Fullerton 
Bain, Andrew, shoemaker, 9 West st 
Baird, Robert, baker,6 High st 
Barclay, Jas. , Bridge st 
Bell, James, carrier, Kirkhill road 
Biggar, J., clothier, High st 
Blaci<, James, V.S. and blacksmith 
Blair, Alexander, clothier. Croft st. 
Borrowman, J., hairdresser. Bridge st 
Brodie, Miss J., dressmaicer, John st 
Brown, D., bricklayer, Jessiemine cot. 
Brown, Adam, builder, Loanburn 
Brown, J., greengrocer, Edinburgh road 
Brown, James, millworker, 20 Kirkhill road 



Brown, James, Tomnahurich 
Brown, Jame?, & Co., Ltd,, Esk paper mills 
Browp, Mrs, South End vi.ia 
Brow!., Robert, teacher, Howgate 
Brown, 1. millwright, Monksburn cot" 
Brown, Themis, plumber, 14 Bridge bt 
Brown, Wm., grocer, Kirkhill 
Bruce, Alex., joiner, Viewforth place 
Bjchaian, C, land stswarJ, Pcrnicuik ho 
Burgess, James, engineer, Kirkhill road 
Burgess, James, Woodslee cot. 
Cairns, James, plasterer, 9 Croft st 
Cairns, John, millwerker, 8 Bridge st 
Cairns, John, carter. Bridge st 
Cairns, John, tailor, West st 
Cairns, W., millworker, Dunlop terrace 
Cameron, C. sen., shoemaker, West st 
Chisholm, J., cycle agent, John st 
Clapperton, A., millworker, 43 John st 
Clapperton, James, farmer, Maybank 
Clapperton, John, millworker. Croft st 
Clapperton, Thomas, Esk bridge cot. 
Clapperton, Robert H., Castlewood cot. 
Co-operative Association, Limited, High st- 

A. Mitchell, manager 
Conn, John, watch & clock maker & jewellen 



Pefitcutk 



63 



Cowan, A., & Sons, Ltd., Vareyfield mills 
Cowan, Charles W., Valleyfield house 
Cowan, Alex., Woodslee 
Cowan, Robert A,, Craigiebield 
Cjvvan, Thos., fanner, Amazondean 
Cowe, Arch., grocer, 24 the Square 
Craster. J.)hn, Welhngton Reformatory 

1^ Crearer, Alex,, j )iner, 7 Croft st 
Cran ton, R., engineer, Foundry ho 
Cranston, Adam, Dunlop ter 
Crockett, S. R., Bank, house 

A Dale, Wm., Hamilton place 

* Davidson, John, Firwoodlee 
Davidson, Joseph, 9 Napier st 
Dewar, Wm., papermaker. Bridge st 
Dent, Irving, farmer, Ravensneuk 
Dickie, George, 9 Valleyfield rd 
Dickie, H., sen., papermaker, 37 John st 
Dickson, D., millworker, 8 Pentland view 
Donald, Jas., Pentand view 
Drill-Instructor, The Armoury 
Dugger, G., china merchant, 19 John st 
Duncan, Jas., Hopemount 
Dykes, Jas., farmer, Cuiken 
Easton, Jane, innkeeper, The Square 
Easton, J. D., Vale cot 
Elliot, Mrs Alex., Venturefair 
Elrington, Rev. Charles A., St James' Epis- 
copal Mission, the Parsonage 
Ewart, |ohn, & Sons, builders 
Ewart, Prof. J. C., the Bungalow 
Ferrier and Cranston, iron founders 

\ Fleming, John, farmer, Coates 

Foulis, James, tailor and clothier, John st 
Frew, Alex., engineer, Dunlop ter 
Fursteneau, A., hairdresser, 5 High st 
Garden, Wm., Outershill 

' Gas Company's Office, gas works 
Gay, John, station agent 
Gilroy, Mrs., farmer, Auchendinny mains 
Gordon, C, station agent, Pomathorn 
Graham, David, baker, 25 John st 
Granger, James, farmer, Mountlothian 
Grieve, Peter, gamekeeper, Westside 
Gunn, D. H. W., Alderbank 
Hamilton, And., coachman, Valleyfield ho. 
Hamilton, David, grocer, Kirkhill 
Harrison, Wm., farmer, Walston 
Hay, Alexander, Royal hotel 
Hay, Frank, 26 Croft st 
Hay, Wm., cabinetmaker, 44 John st 
Henderson, G., butcher, 22 John st 
Henderson, R. J., Craigleur 
Henderson, R., grocer, etc., 2 High s' 
Henderson, Wm., mason. Croft st 



Henderson, John, & Sons, grocers, etc. 

Henderson, T., millworker, Jackson st 

Henderson, Peter, tailor. Square 

Hislop, James, Pomathorn rd 

Hodge, James, painter, 50 John st. 

Hogg, Robert, farmer, Rosemay 

Hojg, Robert, S., John st 

Hogg, W., newsagent, John st 

Holt, D., hammerman, 28 West st. 

Howden, Charles, & Son, watchmakers and 

jewellers, 4 John st 
Hume, Geo., farmer, Fallhills 
Howden, William, Burnbank 
Hunter, John, mason, 11 Croft st. 
Hunter, Mrs J., dressmaker, 46 John St. 
Hutchison, J. H., Kirkhill rd. 
Ironside, J., millworker, Johh st 
Irvine, Robert, Divinity student, Imrie pi. 
Jack, Rev R. T., (Free Ch.),Brae ho 
jardine, John, mill manager, Evelyn cottage 
Jobling, R., com. agent, Hamilton pi 
'enkinson, Mrs A., 33 John st. 
Johnston, Mrs, Viewbank 
Johnston, John P., baker, John st 
Jones, James, bootmaker 
Kay, John, contractor, Broomhill 
Kay, Robt., millworker, 28 West st. 
Keary, Mrs, i Valleyfield rd 
Kerr, John, farmer, Kingside 
Kerr, George, colporteur, 24 Croft;st 
Kerr, Thomas and William, coal agents 
King, John, Valleyfield rd 
Kirkhope, Archibald, forester, Newhall 
Kirkhope, W., gardener, Newhall^house 
Kirkwood, John, engineer, Rosebery pi. 
Laing, Wm., Broomhill rd 
Laiog, Robert, mason, Burnside pi. 
Lamb & Co., bakers. High st. 
Lamb, Gideon, coal merchant, John st. 
Lamb, James, fireman, Thorburn ter. 
Lambie, Aw., farmer, Pomathorn 
Lawson, C, builder, Blackburn cottage 
Lawrie, Wm., gardener, Kirkhill rd 
Leslie, A., mill foreman, Rosebery pi 
Lumsden, Mrs James, 7 Croft st 
Lumsden, James, millworker, 22 Croft st 
Lunnan, Mrs, grocer, Imrie pi 
M'Beath, A., millworker, Thorburn tec 
M'Donald, Thomas, clerk. High st 
M'Farlane, Mrs, 15 West st 
M'Gill, Miss, The Square 
M'Gregor, Alexander, schoolmaster 
M'Gregor, Peter, clerk, John st 
M'Intosh, Alex., millworker, 37 John st 
M'Intosh, David, joiner, Burnside fl 



64: 



Penicuik 



M'Kerrow, Rev. John, U,P. manse 
M'Lean, Alex., hairdresser, 27 Square 
M'Luskey, Mrs F., 24 West st 
M'Nab, J., millworker, 41 John st 
M'Nab, P., jun., papermaker, 45 John'st 
M'Namara, Rev, Father, Alpine villa 
M'Rae, Mrs, Fetteresk 
M'Tavish, James, postman, 20 Wesi st 
Mason Alex., plumber, John st 
Matheson, T,, tailor & clothier. Bridge st 
Melville, Geo., physician, Brae ho 
Menzies, Robert, grccer, Napier st 
Milroy, A., 25 Bridge st 
Mitchell, D., saddler, 17 Bridge st 
Mitchell, John, 10 John st 
Milne, Wm., enginedriver, Thornburn ter 
Montague, Mrs,- 2 Valleyfield rd 
Moran, Henry, millworker, Thornburn pi 
Munro, Hugh, teacher, Kirkhill 
Murdoch, James, smith, Bowlea 
Murray, A., dairyman, Newbigging 
Murray, J., smith, Willowbank 
Murray, Mrs Robert, of Springfield 
Murray, Thomas, Braid wood and Eastside 
Murray, Wm , millworker, 12 Bridge st 
Myles, Henry, contractor. Croft st 

Naismith, Alex., physician, Kirkhill rd. 
Nivison, John, fishmonger, 15 Bridge st 
Noble^ A'ex-., farmer 

Omand, J & W., Crown hotel 

Ormiston & Co., photographers, 44 John st 

Ov;ns,, Wm., Howgate inn 

Patcrson, Itirs, Eastficid 

Peterson, John, Kirkhill 

Paterson, Misses, Fernlea 

Peebles, Miss, fancy warehouse, 3 West st 

Pender, Alex., guard, Dublin st 

Pen nan, Miss, confectioner, 7 West st 

Penman, Mrs,, dressmaker, Pryde's pi 

Plank, James, postman, 19 Bridge st 

Porterfield, David, grocer, Napier st 

Porteous, Wm., millwright, Croft st 

Porteou?, T., chimney sweep, 5 Bridge st 

Prentice, Wm., farmer, Peggyslee 

Purves, Mrs George, 

Ramage, Mrs, i Veitch pi 
Ramsay, Mrs, grocer, Carlops 
Reid, Alex., inspector of police 
Reid, George, engineer, P^-osebank 
Rennie, H.^ carrier, Rosebery pi 
Ritchie, Wm., roadsman, Rosebank cctt 



Ritchie, Thomas, joiner, Hope cott 
Robb, Baillie, engineer, Northbank 
Robb, Mrs W., farmer, Burnstane 
Robertson, John, saddler. High st 
Robertson, Mrs, draper, John st 
Robertson, Robert, farmer^ Leadburn pk 
Rosie, George, chemist 
R-)S'3, John, baker, 4 Croft st 
Russell, Thos,, grocer and draper. High st 
Rujsell, James, Hampden cott., Carlops 



Salmond, John, Bank st 
Scott, Chas. C, clerk, Blackburn cott 
Scott, David, china merchant, 13 Bridge st 
Scott, John, millworker, 12 Bridge st 
Sherrard, Jas,, millworker, 26 Croft st 
Shotts Iron Company, Shottstown 
Sime, James, joiner, 20 Bridge st 
Simpson, Wm., stationer, etc., West st 
Simpson, A., millwright, Croft st 
Sinclair, H., millworker. Croft st 
Small, Wm, plumber, Dalrymple pi 
Smith, David, Broomhi.l rd 
Smith, George, Whim farm 
Smith, Mrs J., grocer, 42 John st 
Smith, John, millworker, Thorburn ter 
Somerville, W., farmer, Wanton walls 
Steel, A'ex., millworker, Woodslee cott 
Steel, John, bootmaker, 19 High st 
Steele, James, farmer, Cornbank 
Stewart, Alex., tinsmith, 31 High st 
Stewart, Arch., Rosebery pi 
Stewart, Wm , 4 Back st 
Steuart, T. E , banker, Stellknowe 
Stoddart, James, vanman, Rosebery pi 
Stoddart, James, farmer, Silverburn 
Stoddart, George, tailor. Croft st 
Strachan, Mrs, 6 Croft st 
Symington, James, merchant 



Tait, A.., Laurence, clerk, Annfield cot 
Tait, Robert, joiner, West st 
Tait, R. W., tailor, The Square 
Tait, James, builder, Woodsbank 
Tail, Thomas, millworker, 16 Croft st 
Taylor, Alex., farmer. Halls 
Taylor, Rev. G. T., Carlops 
Thomas, Rev. David, Howgate 
Thomson, John W., Kirkhill rd 
Thomson, J. P., chemist, 25 High st 
Thomson, David, millworker, II Croft st 
Thomson, Francis, farmer, Auchencorth 
Thomson, John, restaurant, John st 



Penicuik 



65 



Thomson, Jas., smith, Bridge st 
Thomson, John, baker, Woodbrae 
Thomson, John, smith, John st 
Thomson, Mrs, 9 Bridge st 
Thomson, R., hotel_keeper, Leadburn 
Thomson, Rev. Robert, E.C, manse 
Thomson, Wm., baker, Woodbrae 

I Thomson, Wm. A,^Unionist rooms. High st 
Thorburn, Wm.,'3 *Kirkhill rd 
Tod, Miss ]\I, A., draper, Square 
Topple, R., fireman. West st 
Tudhope, Thomas, farmer, Lawhead 

* Tweedie, John, The Cottage, Carlops 

Veitch, M. &J. fancy dealers, Bridgist. 
Veitch, Mrs Robert, innkeeper, Carlops 
Veitch, Thomas, bootmaker, Imrie pi 
Veitch, Robert, papermaker, 5 Kirkhill rd 

Waldie, R. and J., Idabank, Pomathorn 
Walker, Mrs R., Imrie pi. 
Watson, John, shoemaker, 2 Napier st 
Welsh, Thos. H., draper, John st 
White, 1., railway tavern, 12 High st 
White, Wm., plumber, Pryde's pi 



Wilkie. John, 42 Bridge st 

Wilkie, i<nbert, Fielrisend 

Wilkinson, Juhn, millworker, 9 Croft st 

Wilkinson, 1"., millworker, Croft st 

Wilkinson, Edw., mouhler, 34 John st 

Wilkinson, Robert, millworker, The Square 

Williams, Fred. M'Dougall, Eskvale 

Williams, Wm. A., bootmaker. Bridge st 

Williamson, J., slater, Hillview cott 

Williamson, Wm., 6 Kirkhill rd 

Wilson, A., butcher, Pryde's pi 

Wilson, C, joiner, 16 Croft st 

Wilson, P., V.S., John st 

Wilson, J., stition agent, Leadburn 

Wilson, Mrs, Heathville 

Wilson, S., millworker, Braehead cott 

Wilson, Chas., painter, John st 

Wilson, A. G., merchant, The Square 



Young, WJliam, enginedriver, Thorburn ter 
Young, Wm., gas m;inagcr, Ladywood 



-^p 



;^= 



GOREBRIDGE 



Post Office — John Wickham, postmaster 
Deliveries — 7.40 a.m. and 4.20 p.m.; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. (called for). 
1^ Despatches— 8.20 a.m., 12.15, 4., and 6.50 p.m.; Sundays, 7.20 p.m. 

Working Men's Club. — President — Robert Dundas, of Arnistoh. Hon. Presidents — 
Revs. H. M'Lean, Robt. James, rnd D. Wilsoi. Chairman — D. Blaik. Secretary — T. 
Y. Ramsay. Treasurer — R. Neilson. 
•1 Liberal Association. — D. B'aik, chairman; John Wright, secretary; James M'Ncil, 
treasurer. 

Bowling Club — James Pendreigh, president ; T. Y. Ramsay, secretary ; John Dickson, 
treasurer. 

Arniston Curling Club. — President — Captain Robert Dundas, yr., of Arnistbn. Vice- 
President— James Cook. Secy, and Treas.— David Allan, Stobhili. 

Newtonloan Hospital. — Chairman — Major Wardlaw Ramsay, Medical Officer — ^Dr 
Robert Inch. Committee — D. Pringle, D. J. Macfie, J. Dunn, L Warden, Capt. Dundas, 
John Romans, H. Callander, W. Stewart, J. G. Stewart, J. Snodgrass, and D. Blaik. 

Golf Club. — Capt. Dundas, president; Dr R. Inch, captain; W. G. M'Nab, secretary; 
David Blaik, treasurer. 



Aitchison, And., engineman, 8 Glayhouses I Arniston Coal Company, Limited — James 

Aitken, Miss, 16 Dewar villas Malcolm, manager 

Alexander, Robert, farmer, MauldsHe | Arniston Co-operative"^' Store Co. — Alex. 

Allan, David, spirit dealer, Stobhili I Bowie, manager 

Allan, Thomas, molecatcher, Dewarton IBaillie, Chas., engineer, Arniston colliery 



6(^ 



Gorehrtdge 



Barclay, A., Fushiebridge 

Barclay, R., gncer, North Middleton 

Bathgate, W. T., Middleton limeworks 

Bathgate, Wm., joinrr, Carrington 

Bennet, John, 

Bennet, T. & M., bu'l iers 

Bennet, A exander. Shank g:irdens 

Bennet, J )hn, niasj', H ilsi le 

Bennet, iVlntthe%v, biiiliier 

Bennet, Robert, mas.<n 

Bennet, Thomas, bui der 

Black, D.ivid, miner, Dewar villas 

Back, T, 4 Dewar villa; 

B ni :, Divii, taiijr and clothier 

B:a r, Thomas, blac'ismith. South Middleton 

B a<e. Rev. Jas. \V., The .vianse, Temple 

B)A^ie, Ai x., cj-j erat:^e st ^re 

Bjwie, Robert, miner 

Bjyd, Mrs C, Dewarton 

Braid, John, plumber and gasfitter 

Brown, Walter, Currie house 

Bruce, James, factor, Middleton 

Brunt^n, J,, publican 

Brunton, R., teacher, Carrington 

Buchan, James, grocer, Newlandrigg 

Burton, James Tait, of Toxside 



Clapperton, Adam, grocer, etc. 

Clapperton, J., & Sons, slaters, Stobsmills 

Clapperton, J., Wright's houses and Mount 

Clapperton, Margaret and Mary 

Clapperton, Miss, Clapperton villa 

Clapperton, Thomas, W.S. - 

Clark, Richard, shoemaker 

Clements, Miss, nurse, Newbyres 

Cochrane, Colin, & Son, painters & decorators 

Cochrane, James, contractor, Temple 

Cochrane, Mrs, Rosebery 

Cochrane, Wm., smith, Castleton 

Co-operative Store Company, Arniston 

Cook, James, land Stewart, Arniston 

Cook, Mrs, teacher, Toxside 

Cooper, Charles A., Newlandburn house 

Cooper, John, miner 

Core, Rev. W. G., Carrington manse 

Cornwall, Thos., shoemaker, Stobsmill 

Cornwall, Wm., miner, 3 Clayhouses 

Coventry, Wm., Fusiebridge 

Cowe, Misses, drapers 

Cowan, Arch, shoemaker 

Cranston, Wm., fencer, Newlandrigg 

Cranston, J. T. T., Harvkston house 

Crichton, W, farmer, Parduvine 



Crichton, Mrs, Clapperton's land 
Crocket, William, mason, Dewarton 
Cunningham, Ebenezer, 
Cunningham, John, baker 
Currie, Mr=, Eastwood house 
Curr e, John, molecatcher. Temple 
Currie, )., Carrington sawmihs 



Dalglei-h, QtC).^ far ne.-, Rosebery mains 

Denholm, Jam.s, lampman, U.P. church 

Dewar, Capt., of Vogrie 

Dick, Wm., stat'on agent, TyneheaJ 

Dickson. George, farmer, Vo_^r,e mams 

Dickson, George, joiner, Stob'-milt 

Dickson, Peter, baker 

Dickson, Robt., brickmaker, StobsmiKs, 

Dickson, [ohn, plumber. Castle row 

Douglas, Wm., carrier, Carringt n 

Duncan, Daniel, merchant 

Duncan, David, newsagent and merchant 

Duncan, J., coachhirer and spirit dealer 

Dundas, Capt,, Kirkhill house 

Dundas, Robert Sir, of Arniston 



Easton, John, millwright, Bellsmains 
Easton, William, grocer, Stobsmills 
Fairgrieve, John, mason, Dewarton 
Ferrier, William, grocer, Stobsmills 
Ferrier, Finlay, farmer, Tynehead 
Ferrier, Miss, 
Forbes, Mrs, Middleton 
Forman, Frederick, surfaceman 
Forrest, George, Ford cottage 
Forrester, W., station agent 
Fortune, James, smith, Arniston 
Foster, Matthew, manufacturer, Ford 



Gall, Thomas, postman, Fushie 

Gardner, Sergeant, police station 

Gibb, John, engineer 

Gilchrist, Chas., blacksmith. Clayhouses 

Gillies, Jas., tailor, Stobsmills 

Gillies, Adam, miner, Clayhouses 

Gilmore, Rev Robt, F. C. manse. Temple 

Graham, Thomas, farmer, Fountainside 

Globe provision store 

Graham, W., Braidwood cottage. Temple 

Grieve, Adam, joiner, Carrington 



Haig, Robert, farmer, Braidwood 
Hardie, Wm., carter, 



Gorebridg6 



67 



Hamilton, James, miner 

Hastie, John, schoolmaster 

Hay, James, draper 

Hay, Miss, dressmaker 

Henderson, John, factor, Vogrie 

Henderson, Mrs Ann, Dewarton 

Herderson, R., farmer, Saughland, Tynehead 

Hedman, Thos., farmer, Southside 

Hislop, J. D,, cashier, Arniston Collieries 

Houston, Miss, draper 

Hogg, Arch., baker and confectioner 

Hunter, James, farmer, Castleton 

Hunter, R., farmer, Cauldhall 

Hunter, Miss, grocer, Mossend 

Hunter, Mrs, Stobsmills 

Hutchison, J., farmer, Borthwick mains 

Hutchison, James S., butcher 



Inch, James, farmer, Loquheriot 
Inch, R:obcrt, M.B., CM. fEdin.) 
Inch, Robert, '^armer, Carrington mai: s 



James, Rev. R., M.A., U.P. manse 
Johnstone & Cossar, joiners, Temple 
Johnstone, W., gamekeeper, Arniston 



Kerr, John, farmer, Yorkstone 

Kinsley, D., slater 

Kinsley, J;imes, joiner 

King, Peter, Powder mil's cntt 

Kirkwo)d, T., blacksm th, C irrington 

Knox, James, butcher 



laA-re, Thomas, farmer, Esjerst;ne 
Lees, Mrs, 7 Harvieston terrace 
Liddle, John, farmer, Blinkbonny 
Low, Mrs, 5 Dewar villas 
Lowe, R., schoolmaster, Temple 
Lumsden, A., forester. North Middleton 



Mackay & Co., provision merchants 
M'AUistur, Mrs John, Dewarton 
M'Far'ane, Thomas, joiner and undertaker 
M'intosh, John, miner, Stobsmills 
Mackay, John, timekeeper 
Malcolm, James, colliery manager, MiUbank 
M'Lean, Rev. Hector, B.D., F.C. manse 
M'Nab, W. , chemist 



M'Gowan, Henry, watchmaker 
M'Neill, David, miner, Dean ter 
M'Neil, James, grocer 
M'Taggart, C, Arniston gardens 
Millar, George, boot and shoemaker 
Miller, Peter, tinsmith 
Mitchell, Miss, teacher, Stobhill school 
Mitchell & Co., limeburners, Esperston 
Morrison, Thomas, carter, Newbyres 
Morton, Thomas, farmer, Redhaugh 
Murray, David, newsagent 
Murray, Mrs Christina, North Middleton 
Nayamith, Alexander, m liworker 



Neilson, R., miner 

Nethery, R, snrfaceman 

Nicol, Mrs, 12 Dewar villas 

Noble, A. & R., farmers, Shewington 

Norman, John, labourer, Fushiebridge 



Otten, A., gardener, B ackcastle, Tjnehead 



Pate, Mrs, East M ddleton 
Pate, John, East INIiddleton 
Pate, Thomas, farmer. West Middleton 
Paterson, Peler, clerk, Fushiebridge 
Pearson, Andrew, tailor, Dewarton 
Pendreigh, Jas., & Sons, Catcune mill 
Pendreigh, James, grocer 
Philip, Mrs, M'Neill's buildings 
Plenderleith, A., miner, Cockhill 
Pringle, John, Harvieston ter 
Pringle, Rob.rt, innkeei;er, Cockmuir 
Pringle, Robert, Old Blinkbonny 
Pringle, Wm., farmer. Temple farm 



Rankine, Geo., shoemaker, 10 DcA'ar villas 

Reid, Thomas, clothier, Stobsmills 

Ritchie, Jas., flesher, Harvieston ter 

Ritchie, Wilham, of Middleton 

Robin, H. M., chemist 

Rutherford, Geo., Monteith houses 

Ruthven, Mrs Wm. baker, Clayhouses 



Scott, Walter Bryce, Middiefield 
Scott, Wm., farmer, Mountskip 
acougall, Alex., carrrier, Dewarton 
Sellar, Mrs, 

Sharp, James, miner, Hunterfield 
Stewart, T, gas manager 



68 



Qorebridgi 



Simpson, John, far.ner, Outerstone 

Simpson, R. , farmer, Edgelaw 

Smith, George, vanman 

Smith, Peter, joiner, Stobsmills 

Smith James, grocer, Carrington 

Smith, Joseph, farmer, Borthwick 

Smith Robert, architect, Ncvvbyres 

Spratt, Robert, dairv'man, Curne inn 

Spalding William, M.D. 

Steel, Alex., McNeill's blclgs 

Stenhouse, Joseph, Carrington 

Stevenson, Robt., grocer and sp'r t dealer 

Stewart, T., checker, 

Stewart, iVIrs J ihn, grocer, FushiebriJge 

Stirling, M;s3 Graham 

S:o;ldart R., inspector oi poor, Stobsmills 

Stoddart, James, Coc'cmuir 

Sljddart, Mrs T^hn, Stobsmills 



Tait, EJ., farmer. Old Middleton 

Tait, Misses 

Taylor, Miss Catherine, dressmaker 

Tennant G., letter carrier, 

Thomson Brothers, builders 

Thomson John, mason 

Thomson, T., engineman, 8 Harvieston ter 

Thomson, Jos., miner, 5 Harvieston ter 

Torrance, W". B., traveller, Catcune farmhouse 

Turnbull, George, farmer, Gowkshill 



Veitch, James, forester, Bellsmains 

Waddell, Rev. Walter, Borthwick manse 
Warden, Robt., schoolmaster, Borthwick 
Waugh, Peter, Arniston store 
Webb, Matthew, porter 
White, John, smith, T,.xside 
White, Mrs Margaret, Newlandburn 
White & Sons, farmers, Halkerston 
Whitie, J., bootmaker and ironmonger 
Wickham, John, draper, post office 
Wickham, Thomas, farmer, Curr;e Inn 
Wight, Geo., Saughland, Tynehead 
Wight, G. , Blackcastle, Westmains 
Wight, J., Dewar villas 
Wight, Mrs, Blackcastle, Tynehead 
Wightman, John, saddler 
Wilkinson, Wm. , Clayhouses 
Wilson, Mrs John, grocer. Temple 
Wilson, Mrs, farmer, Torcraik 
Wilson, Res. David, (E.G.) Stobsmills 
Woodrow, John, labourer, Clayhouses 
Wright James, surfaceman, 7 Dewar villas 

Young, John, miner, 5 Dewar villas 
Voung, Thomas, miner, Cockhill 



HERIOT 



4 



Post Office — Thomas Elder, postmaster. 
Delivery — 7. }-0 a.m. Despatch — 4.2 p.m. dai'y, except Suns 



Alston, James, farmer, Heriot mill 

Anderson, Robert, Glisten 

Bennet, John, Crookston north mains 

Biake, A-^am, D^war 

Bjrthwick, John, of Crookston 

Brown, Rev. John F., Manse 

Cossar, Charles, farm-r, H2ri )t town 

Dun, John S., G Iston 

Dunn, Jame^, Falahill farm 

Elder, Thos. , station agent & postmaster 

Ford, George, farmer, 3rotherston 

Fulerton, Richard, mason, Kilcoulter 

Helm, James, Haltree 

Herkes, Charles, blacksmith, San lyknowe 

Inglis, Thomas, farmer, Brothershiels 

Kidd, J., police constable, Heri )t 

Linton, John P., joiner 



Macfie, David J., of Borthwickhall 
Muir, Mrs Jane, grocer, Robcrton 
Pendreigh, Geo., farmer, Gnrvald 
Plenderleith, Archd., farmer, Blackhope 
Pringle, James, joiner, Kirklandhi 1 
Reeves, Wm. Old toll house 
Sandilands, David, Brjthershiel. 
Sfewart, Tr. of Charles, farmer, Nettlingflat 
Tait, Wm., grocer, Hangingshaw 
rillie, John, farmer, Hangingshaw 
Torrance, William, Carcant 
Walker, Alexander, smith, Stagebank 
Wallace, Mrs John W. , farmer, Shoestanes 
W--ir, William, schoolhous!; 
Wilson, Wm., Raeshaw 
Wood Brodiers, farmers, Corsehope 



FORD 



Post Office — Alexander D, Wallace, postmaster. 

Deliveries— 8.40 a.m.; Sundays, 9 to 10 a.m. (called for), 
Despatclies— 1 p.m and 5.55 p.m.; Sundays, 3.55 p.m. 
Places of Worship. 
W Established Church, Cricliton, Rev A. W. Fergusson, B.D.; Cranston, Rev George S. 
Smith, D.D. U.P. Church, Ford— Rev. A. Gemmell, B.D. 



Ainslie, Robert, farmer, Dodridge 

I Aitken, S., Sauchenside 

* Allan, R. , Magazine cot. 

Baillie, Mrs J. C, china dealer, Pathhead 
Bain, Thomas, slater, Pathhead 
Bathgate, C. P., Magazine Lime Works 
Baxter, James, baker, Pathhead 
Baxter, Mrs, Pathhead 
Bayne, Misses, Pathhead 
Bertram, Thos, blacksmith, Edgehead 
Binnie, F. , forester, Oxenford castle 
Binnie, Geo., Edgehead 
Blackadder, Wm., sliepherd, Pathhead 
Blyth, Wm., publican, Pathhead 
Borthwick, Thos., of Whitburgh 
Bridges, George, blacksmith, Crichton 
Brown, W^m., draper, Pathhead 
Brown, William, saddler, Pathhead 
Brown, Wm., restaurateur, Pathhead 
Callendcr, Henry ii., of Prestonhall 
Cockburn, James, Stair Arms Inn 
Cocklmrn, Wm., carrier, Crichtondean 

I Combe, P. J., Y.S., Pathhead 
Craig, Dr Archibald, Pathhead 
Dalrymple-Hamilton, Major N., Oxenford 
Dickson, William, farmer, Currielea 

^ Dickson, R., joiner, Edgehead 
Duncan, Thos., Pathhead 
Fairley, Robert, baker, Pathhead 
Fairley, Richard, grocer. Pathhead 
Farmer. Wm., hawker, Pathhead 
Fergusson, Rev. A. W., B.D., Crichton 
Forrest, George, Ford gardens 
Gardener, J., joiner, Oxenford castle 
Gemmell, Rev. A., B.D., U.P. manse, Ford 
Hanton, Robert, schoolmaster, Cranston 
Hardie, James, joiner, Crichton 
Hardie, John, shoemaker, Pathhead 
Hastings, Wm., draper, Pathhead 
Henderson, John, land stewart, Vogrie 
Henderson, M., molecatcher. Ford 
Hendersonj Robert, farmer Saughland 
Hogg, Thos., farmer, Oxenford mains 
Hunter, Alex., carter, Pathhead 
Hunter, W. S., Ford house 



Jack, S., farmer, Crichton mains 
Jamieson, James, farmer. Mutton hole 
JettVey, Wm., blacksmith, Preston 
Johnston, John, Edgehead 
Johnstone, George, Haughhead 
Johnston, Matthew, mason, Edgehead 
Johnston, William, mason, Newlandrigg 
Lamb, G., shepherd, Oxenford castle 
Leitch, William, smith. Magazine 
McDonald, James, slater, Pathhead 
M'Donald, Wm., roadman, Pathhead 
M'Dowell, T. N., farmer, Remote 
McGregor, James, tailor, Pathhead 
M'Kerrow, Jas., watchmaker, Pathhead 
M'Kinlay, Mrs, Pathhead 
M'Harrie, S., factor, Cran.stoun-Riddell 
M'Lean, Robert, & son, grocer, Pathhead 
Meek, Alexander, Edgehead 
Meek, William, Edgehead 
Miller, Misses, Fathead 
Mills, Alexander, lime agent, Pathhead 
Vlotfat, George, Fordeldean 
Moir, James, tailor, Pathhead 
Mossman, Alex., carrier, Pathhead 
Nairn, Wm., farmer, Edgehead 
Nicholson, Maxwell, taiior, Pathhead 
Noble, George, farmer, Loanhead 
Ormiston, Mrs Alison, Pathhead 
Ormiston, Robert, carter, Pathhead 
Oliver, Andrew, grieve, Muttonhole 
Oliver, George J., Crichtondean 
Paterson, Mrs, Pathhead 
Pringle, James, farmer, Crichton house 
Pringle, Wm., teacher, Pathhead 
Ritchie, George, farmer, Whippielaw 
Ritchie, John, dairyman, Pathhead 
Ritchie, Wm., grocer, etc., Pathhead 
Robertson, Robert, blacsksmith, Pathhead 
Robertson, T,, slater, Pathhead 
Ross, J. & S., farmers, Tttrniedykes 
Rutherford, Misses, Hop.e farm 
Scott, J., mason, Pathhead 
Scott, Walter, butcher, Pathhead 
Scott, John, farmer, Fordel jiarks 
Smith, R. a1, baker, Pathhead 



70 



Ford 



Scougall, Robert, mason, Edgehead 

Shearer, Jas., Pathhead 

Simpson, Jas. & Peter, slaters, Pathhead 

Slimon, R., of Whitburgh 

Smeaton, John, mason, Pathhead 

Smith, R3V. G. S., M.A., Cranston 

Smith, Wm., gardener, Oxenford castle 

Stirling, John, factor, Prestondene 

Suttie, Wm., merchant, Pathhead 

St Mary's C.C. 

Tait, Mrs M., confectioner, Pathhead 

Taylor, Mrs A., King's House, Pathhead 

Thomson, W. , gamekeeper, Oxenford castle 

Tod, Alexander, Dewarton 



Torrance, Miss, grocer, Edgehead 
Trotter, Robert, joiner, Pathhead 
Urqahart, Alex., grievt;, Rosemount 

Wallace, Alex., carrier, Pathhead 
Wallace, Joseph, North Pathhead 
Wallace & Son, grocers ij^ 

Waters, William, Pathhead ' ^li 

Watt, A. insurance agent, Pathhead 
White, A., I^restonhail ('olliery, Ormiston 
White, Win., blacksmith, Edgehead . 

Wilson, John, hallkeeper, Pathhead If 

Wilson, Mrs R., Pathhead 



BL AOKSHIELS 



Post Office — Adam Archibald, postmaster. 
Delivery — 8.35 a.m. Despatch — 3 p.m. 



Ainslie, David, of Costerton 
Allan, John, Fala dam 
Archibald, Adam, postmaster 
Archibald, Andrew, Blackshiels 

Baillie, A. E., manager, Costerton 
Bald, Andrew, gardener, Woodcote 
Baxter, Andrew, roa.isman, Blackshiels 
Banks, R )bert, shoemaker, Fala dams 
Bisset, Tho3., gardener, C isterton 
B )ag, Agnes, Costerton 
Bradlaugh, Michael, Fala 
Brockie, Miss, grocer, Fala dam 
Broomfield, Robert, Blackshiels 
Barns, Richard, Costerton lodge 
Burton, James, farmer, Fala hall 
Cameron, Hugh, forester, Fala 
Craig, James, roadman, Faladam 
Dalgleish,John, shepherd, Falahall 
Dickson, Alex., baker, i Herkes cottages 
Dods, James, Deanburn 
Donaldson, Alexander, Blackshiels 
Djncan, James, schoolmaster, Fala 
Fenton, Thos. , steward, Woodcot mains 
Fjrsyth, Jas., gamekeeper. West main 5 
Hare, James, Juniperlea inn 
Henderson, Frank, Blackshiels 
Horn, Wilh'am, Woodcote park 



Hunter, Rev. James, The Manse, Fala 

Johnston, Thomas, postman, Routinghill 

Laidlaw, W. , shepherd, Costerton haugh 

Leitch, A., blacksmith, Woodcote 

Merricks, Hezekiah, Fala dam 

M'Vicars, John, gamekeeper, Woodcot park 

M'Whannel, Thomas, coachman, Costerton 

Pate, J. , farmer, Soutra mains 

Paterson, Mrs WiUiam, Fala mill 

Pratt, Mrs, Fala 

Prentice, Wm., Fala mains 

Raeburn, WiUiam, roadsman, Fala mains 

Redpath, James, grieve, Soutra mains 

Simpson, James, joiner, Fala dam 

Smeal, Adam, baker, Fala 

Spence, Sarah, dressmaker, Fa'a 

Stoddart, Walter, wright, Fala 

Stuart, James, gamekeeper, Fala park 

Thomson, Alex., blacksmith, Fala 

Watt. Rev. John, U, P. Manse, Fala 

White, Wm., shepherd, Woodcot 

Whitelaw, Alex., grocer, Fala 

Wiliochs, John, coachman, Woodcote park 

Young, Wm., grieve. West mains 



upper Keith 



71 



UPP ER KEITH 



Amos, Alexander, Humbie mill 
Bridges, Alexander, blacksmith, Lugate 
Burton, James, farmer, Bught knowe 
Christie, Wm., coachman, Johnstonburn 
H Crossbie, Alexander, B egbie 

Dickson, John, grieve, Upper Keith 
Dishington, Andrew, forester, Blacklaw 
Ewart, Andrew, shepherd, Upper Keith 
Fairbairn, Alexander, Leaston Sawmills 
Fairbairn, John, gardener, Stobshiel 
Finlayson, Rev. Matthew, F. C. Manse 
Grieve, Ada'ti, jomer, Lugate 
Henderson, George, farmer, Upper Keith 
Herkics, Edward, forester, Humbie 
Herkies, William, Humbie mill 
Hutchison, Thos., forester, Humbie milL 
Inch, John, fanner, Pogbie 
Johnston, Mrs, draper, Upper Keith 
Johnstone, Thomas, Upper Keith 
Kirk. Robert, shepherd, Blegbie 
Laurie, James, shephert, Humbie 
Lindsay, |ames, shepherd, Pogbie 
M'La-en, Rev. David, Humbie manse 
Muir, William, Upper Keith 



Nisbet, C. C, of Stobshicls 

Oliver, William, New mains 

Polworth, Lord, Humbie house 

Polworth, Master of, Humbie house 

Pate, James, farmer, ]\Iavishall 

Purves, William, Humbie mill 

Paxton, James, grieve, Pogbie 

Ramsay, James, New mains 

Rutherford, Geo., gamekeeper, Humbie 

Scott, John, shepherd, Chesterhill 

ShaWjD, superintendent boys' home, Humbie 

Smith, Charlee, farmer, Leaston 

Stewart, C. , manager, Humbie mains 

Stewart, Fred., gamekeeper, Johnstonburn 

Stuart, John, schoolmaster, Humbie 

Thom, Robert, Chesterhill 

Tod, W., farmer, Stobshiel 

Turner, Tohn, High lea 

Usher, Mrs, ot Johnstounburn 

Weir, Mrs E. D., postmistress 

Weir, David, postman 

Welsh, John, gardener, Humbie 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THOMAS CUMP8TIE, 

x> .Al iLi xiL £3 1 rr XI, 

Respectfully intimates that he executes every descriptiou of 
riiiu and Oriiameutal Brick Work. Chimney Stalks, Gas 
Tanks, and Boilers Built, at Moderate Terms. Estimates 
Furnished for the same. 

T.C. begs to assure his patrons that all work entrusted 
to liim will have his personal attention, and will be executed 
by practical workmen. 

All Jobbing punctually attended to at equally Moderate 
Rates 

BRIDGEND, DALKEITH. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



The ADDRESS Preseiited to 

by the BURGH OF DALKEITH 

071 the occasion of the Diamo^id Jubilee 
was stLpplied by 

THOMAS KEMP, too High Street, Dalkeith. 

*^* Send for Designs and Prices of every variety of Presentation 
Addresses— from lOs. to £5, 5s. 



KEMPS 



Printing Works: 

100 High St., 

Dalkeith. 



Special Lines: —The EUamjiUe $enes ixl nt 6d 
Printing Fapjets (Six Shades) Specially made 
at a well-known Scotch Mill. 

f^r This make of Paper is being largely used for the Avork of many of 
the principal merchants and mills and factories in Dalkeith and the C on y 
generally. 



Exelusitje twines in €ards 0! euerv^ trariety— 
from Scottish and English Manufacturers. 



Quotations for every variety of Printing on application. 



£200 




INSURANCE AGAINST ACCIDENTS. 



^ COUPON TICKET . 

SPECIALLY GUARANTEED BY THE 

OCEAN ACCIDENT & GUARANTEE 
CORPORATION, Limited. 

40, 42 & 44, IVBOORGATE STREET, LONDON, E.G. 

(to whom Notice of Claims, under the following conditions, must be sent 
within seven days of accident to the above address. ) 



Two HuriDRED PoUi^DS 

WILL BE PAID 

by the above Corporation to the legal representative of anyone who is killed by an 

accident to the 

RAILWAY TRAIN, TRAMCAR, OMNIBUS, 
OR STEAMBOAT 

(within the United Kingdom or Channel Islands), in which the deceased was a ticket 
bearing or paying passenger, or who shall have been fatally injured thereby (should 
death result within ninety days after such accident.) 

Should such accident not prove fatal, but cause within the same period of ninety 
-days, the loss of two limbs (both arms or both legs, or one of each, by actual separa- 
tion above the wrist or ankle), the person injured shall be entitled to receive 

I ^f or for the loss of one limb under 
9 ^^ aforesaid conditions, 

PSOYIDED that the person so killed or injured had upon his or her person, or had 
left at home this Book or Almanack in its entii-ety, with his, or her, usu.il signature, 
written prior to the accident, on the space provided below, which, to_s;et!"ier willi the 
giving of notice within the time as hereinbefore mentioned, is the essence of this 
contract. 

This Insurance holds good from date of pubhcation until June 3ot!i, 1899, and 
carries the benefits of, and is subject to the conditions of, the "OCEA.\' ACC IDENT 
AND GUARANTEE COMPANY, Limited, Act, 18,0," Ri.k^ Nos. 2, 3. ^ and 6. 

No person can recover under more than one Coupon Ticket in resi)cct of the same 
risk. 

Signature , 



ADVFT^TISEMENTS 



,. r^ ^W. #S..ASS. 



"CYCLEDOM" 

BUCCLEUCH STREET, DALKEITH. 



Sole Ageiits for "Alpine" Cyclos; al.M) Ag-enis for Coventry || 
Cross, Waverley, Perfect, Hobait, Victory, and Humber 
Cycles. 

^ 

Hiring by the Hour, Day, Week, or Month. ' 

THE 

Head Office: 2 York Buildings, EDINBURGH. 

Agent for Dalkeith and District— 
THOMAS HANTON, Solicitor, White Hart St., D kelth- 

No Annual Subscription. 
No Commission on Uncollected Accounts. 



Commission on Sums received : — 

On Sums under ^£5 7J per cent 

Over ;£"5 and,, ^10 5 

„ ;£io ,5 ,, ^20 3 

Over £s^ by special arrangement 

ROBERT MILLER, 

Practical Watch & Ciook Mcker, Jeweller, &c.. 

20 siia if 1111, i4asiifi 



!» 



A large Assortment of Gold and Silver Watches, Clocks and Jewellery on hand. 

All Kinds of British and Fon ign Watclies aiiH Clocks care- 
fully Uleanevi and Repaired. Jewellery Neatly Repaired 



Mid-Lothian County Council- 



Elected, December 1898. 

Conve7ier. 

Sir James H. Gibson Craig, of Riccarton, Bart. 

Vice- Convejier. 

Captain Robert Dundas. 

SUBURBAN DISTRICT. 

Colinton (North) — Henry Forrester. Colinton (South) — 
Colonel J. M. Trotter, Colinton House. Corstorphine — 
J. Pringle Taylor. Cramond — Jose Ormiston. Duddingston and 
South Leith — Major Christian, Portobello. Liberton (North- 
East)— John Welsh. Liberton (South-West)— Donald S. 
M'Donald. Newton— W. Harper, Sheriffhall Mains. 

CALDER DISTRICT. 

Currie (North)— Sir J. H. Gibson Craig, Bt. Currie (South)— D. 

B. Fairbairn. Kirknewton (North)— W. Wilkie, Ormiston. Kirk- 
newton (South) — J. A. Maconochie Wellwood. Mid-Calder (North) 
— Lord Torphichen, Calder House. Mid-Calder (South) — J. 

C. Stoddart. Ratho (North)— Frank J. Usher. Rathe 
(South)— James Elder. West Calder— T. Prentice. Addiewell 
— J. Graham Fairley. Harburn — A. T. S. Scott. 

LASSWADE DISTRICT. 
Bonnyiigg (Burgh)— John Geo. Stewart. Carrington— R. G. 
Wardlaw Ramsay of Whitehill. Cockpen — William Stewart. 
Dalkeith (Landward)— J. McHutchen Dobbie. Dalkeith (Burgh)— - 
Robert Handyside, S.S.C. Glencorse — A. W. Inglis. Inveresk — 
James Gemmell. Lasswade (North) — Daniel Gardener. 
Lasswade (South) — James A. Hood, Rosewell. Lasswade 
(Burgh) — J. F. Lowson. Loanhead (Burgh)— J. Gunn. Newbattle 
— J. Romans, Newtongrange. Penicuik (Burgh) — Alexander 
Cowan, Penicuik. Penicuik — C. Buchanan, Penicuik. 

GALA WATER DISTRICT. 

Borthwick — D. Blaik, Gorebridge. Cranston and Fala — 

Earl of Stair. Crichton — H. Callander of Prestonhall. Heriot — 

D. J. Macfie of Borthwickhall, Stow — David Pringle of Torquhan. 
Temple — Robert Dundas yr. of Arniston. 



t)-VERTlSEMENTS 




FINEST STEEL AND NICKEL 

SPECTACLES AND EYE6LASSES 

Carefully adapted to every defect of vision. 

Oculists' Prescriptions for Astigmatism, etc. 
Executed with Care. 

Repairs of all Kinds. New Springs, Lenses, etc. 



CINEMATOGRAPH. 
Photographic Apparatus. Kodaks & Hand Cameras 

Every Requisite for the Photographer. 
Amateurs' Plates and Films Developed and Printed. 



LIME-LIGHT EXHIBITIONS given in town and country. 

Large Selection of Slides of Home and Foreign Views. 

Slides made from Photos and Pictures. 

Large Stock of Triple Wick, Oil, and Lime-Light Lanterns, 
Compressed Gas, &c. 



Illustrated Catalogues Iree. 



JAMES BUNCLE 



(Smnttfi'e Instrttiiunt .i^iikcr, 

21 ©AST ^liAITLAND STREET, 

WEST END OF PRINCES STREET. 

@"DINBURGH, 



Scottish Members of Parliarnent, 



COUNTIES— 

Aberdeen (E), T. R. Buchanan, I 
Aberdeen (W), Dr R. Farquharson, I 
Argyll, D. N. N.col, u 
Ayr (North), Hon. T. H. Cochrane, tt 
A^r (South), Sir W. Arrol, u 
Banff, Sir W. Wedderburn, I 
Berwick, H. J. Tennant, I 
Bute, A. Graham Murrav, c 
Caithness, Dr G. B. Clark, I 
Clackmannan and Kinross, Right Hon. 

J. B. Balfour, I 
Dumbarton, A. Wylie, -u 
Dumfries, A. R. Souttar, I 
Elgin and Nairn, J. A Gordon, u 
Fife (East), H. H. Asquith, I 
Fife (West), A. Birrell, / 
Forfar, Capt. J. Sinclair, I 
Haddington, R. B. Haldane, I 
Inverness, J. E. B. Baillie u 
Kincardine, J. W. Crombie, I 



39 MEMBERS, 

Kirkcudbright, M. J. Stewart, c 
Lanark — Govan, John Wilson, I 
Lanark — Partick, J. Parker Smith u 
Lanark (N.W.), J. G. Holburn, I 
Lanark (N.E.), J. Colville, I 
Lanark (Mid), J. Caldwell, I 
Lanark, (S), James H. C. Hozier, c 
Linlithgow, A. Ure, / 
Midlothian, Sir T. Gibson Carmichael, I 
Orkney and Shetland, L. Lyell, I 
Peebles and Selkirk, W. Thorburn, lo 
Perth (E), Sir J. G. S. Kinloch, I 
Perth (W. ) Sir Donald Currie, lo 
Renfrew (E. ), M. H. Shaw-Stewart, c 
Renfrew (W), C. B. Renshaw, c 
Ross and Cromarty, J. G. Weir, I 
Roxburgh, Earl of Dalkeith, u 
Stirling, J. M'Killop, I 
Sutherland, J, Macleod, I 
Wigtown, Sir H. E. Maxwell, c 



CITIES AND BURGHS— 31 MEMBERS. 



Aberdeen (North), Capt. Vernon Pirie, I 

Aberdeen (South), Dr J. Bryce, I 

Ayr, Campbelltown. Oban, Invrraray, 

Irvine — G. L, Orr-Ewing, u 
Dumfries, Annan, Kirkcudbright, San- 
quhar, LochfKiaben — R. T. Reiil, I 
Dundee, E. Robertson, I 5 John Leng, I 
Eainburgh (East), R. Wallace, I 
Edinburgh (West), Sir L. M'lver, u 
Edinburgh (Central), W. M'Ewan, I 
Edinburgh (South), R. Cox, u 
Elgin, Banff, Peterhead, Inverurie, 

C alien, Kintore — Alex. Asher, I 
Falkirk, Airdrie, Lanark, Hamilton, 

Linlithgow— John Wilson, u 
Glasgow — Bridgeton, Sir Charles 

C;:meron, D.D. 
Glasgow — Camlachie, Alex, Cross, ii 
Glasgow — St Rollox, F. Faithfull Begg, u 
Glasgow— Central, J. G. A. Baird, c 
Glasgow — Blackfriars and Hutcheson 

tjv\n, A. D. Provand, I 
Gl.^gjvv— College, Sir J. M. Stirling 

Maxwell, u 



Glasgow — Tradeston, A, C. Corbett, u 

Greenock, T, Sutherland, u 

Hawick, Galashiels, Selkirk, Thos. 

Sliaw, I 
Inverness, Forres, Fortrose, Nairn, Sir R. 

B. Findlay, u 

Kilmarnock. Port -Glasgow, Dumbarton, 
Renfrew, Rutherglen, J. M. Denny, to 

Kirkcaldy, Burntisland, Kinghorn, and 
Dysart, J. H. Dalziel, / 

Leith, Musselburgh, and Portobello, R. 

C. M' nro-Ferguson, I 

Montrose, Arbroath, Forfar, Brechin, 
Bervi?, Rt. Hon. J. Morley, I 

Paisley, W. Dunn, I 

Perth, R. Wallace, I 

St Andrews, Anstru her (E and W. ), 
Crail, Cupar, Kilrenny, Pittenweem, 
H. T. Anstruther, u 

Stirling, Dunfermline, Inverkeithing, 
Oueensferry, Culross — Right Hon. H. 
Campbell-Bannerman, I 

Wick, Dingwall, Tain, Cromartv, Kirk- 
wall, Dornach— T. C. Hedderwick, I 



Universities — ^Edinburgh and St Andrews, Sir W. Priestly, it 
z Members. J Glasgow and Aberdeen, James A. Campbell, u 



ADVt:RTISEMb:NTS 



JOHN RIDDELL, 
Cabinetmaker, Upholsterer, Undertaker, 

Auctioneer, Valuator &. House-Agent, 

Blmfield Place; DALKEITH, 

[End of South Street] 
All kinds of House Jobbing punctually attended to- 

Furniture Re-stutfed and Covered- 

Mattresses Made up Equal to New. 
Blinds of all kinds supplied. 

Venetian Blinds Re-taped and cordtd. 
Tables, Stuffed Forms and Ball Cloths on Hire. 

Charges — Moderate. 

justinlees Jnn, Eshbank 

(Near Railway Station.) 



Tourists and Travellers will find Good and Com- 
fortable Refreshments at the above Inn. 

Families in Town and Country supplied with Wines, 

Malt Liquors, Sweet and Bitter Ales, and 

London Porter of the Finest Quality. 



I 



ROBERT J. NOBLE, Proprietor. 



VALUE OF OXEN. COWS, & 


c. OF DIFFERENT WEIGHTS AT VARIOUS | 








PRICES 


PER HUNDREDWEIGHT. 






Per 


g?- 


//'.-. 


^ri 


^'~Ths7 


cwt. 


CTut 


. qrs. 


• cwt. 


cwt 


4rrj. 


cwt. 


cwt 


qrs. 


cwt. 


Per 


1 ci^n. 


I 





2 







4 


4 


2 




s 


5 


2 


6 


6 


2 




7 


cwt. 




^ 


J. d. 


~z 


s. d. 


"7 


s. d. 


I 


s. d. 


'J 


s. d. 


"I 


"7.^ 


£s.d. 


~J 


s. d. 


~I 


s. d. 




2r/- 





5 3 





10 6 


4 


4 


4 


14 6 


s 


S 


5 


156 


660 


6 


16 6 


7 


7 


21/- 


2.1 - 





5 6 





II 


4 


8 


4 


19 


s 


10 


6 


I 


6 12 


7 


3 


7 


14 


22/- 


23- 





5 9 





II 6 


4 


12 


S 


3 6 


s 


15 


6 


6 6 


6 18 


7 


9 6 


8 


I 


23/- 


24;- 





6 





12 


4 


16 


S 


8 


6 





6 


12 


740 


7 


16 


8 


8 


24/- 


27 - 





6 3 





12 6 


5 





5 


12 6 


6 


S 


6 


17 6 


7 10 


8 


2 6 


8 


15 


25/- 





6 6 





13 


s 


4 


5 


17 


6 


10 


7 


3 


7 16 


8 


9 


9 


2 


26/- 





6 9 





13 6 


5 


8 


6 


I 6 


6 


15 


7 


8 6 


820 


8 


156 


9 


9 


27/- 


28/- 





7 





14 


S 


12 


6 


6 


7 





7 


14 


880 


9 


2 


9 


16 


28/- 


29/- 





7 3 





14 6 


5 


16 


6 


10 6 


7 


5 


7 


19 6 


8 14 


9 


8 6 


10 


3 


29/- 


■( 30/- 





7 6 





15 ol 6 





6 


15 


7 


10 


8 


5 


900 


9 


15 


10 


10 


30/- 


Ihl/- 





7 9 





IS 6; 6 


4 


6 


19 6 


7 


IS 


8 


10 6 


960 


10 


I 6 


10 


17 


31/- 


32/ 





8 





16 


6 


8 


7 


4 


8 





8 


16 


9 12 


10 


8 


II 


4 


32/- 


33/- 





83 





16 6 


6 


12 


7 


8 6 


8 


5 


9 


I 6 


9 18 


10 


14 6 


II 


II 


33'- 


1 34/- 





8 6 





17 


6 


16 


7 


13 


8 


10 


9 


7 


10 4 


II 


I 


II 


18 


34/- 


35/- 





8 9 





17 6 


7 





7 


17 6 


8 


IS 


9 


12 6 


10 10 


II 


7 6 


12 


5 


35/- 


36/- 





9 





18 


7 


4 


8 


2 


9 





9 


18 


10 16 


II 


14 


12 


12 


36/- 


37/- 





9 3 





18 6 


7 


8 


8 


6 6 


9 


S 


10 


36 


II 20 


12 


6 


12 


19 


37/- 


3«'- 





96 





19 


7 


12 


8 


II 


9 


10 


10 


9 


II 8 


12 


7 


13 


6 


38/- 


39/- 





9 9 





19 6 


7 


16 


8 


156 


9 


IS 


10 


14 6 


II 14 


12 


136 


13 


13 


39/- 


40/- 





10 







8 





9 





10 





II 





12 


13 





14 





40/- 


41/- 





10 3 




6| 8 


4 


9 


4 6 


10 


S 


II 


56 


12 60 


13 


6 6 


14 


7 


41/- 


42'- 





10 6 




I 8 


8 


9 


9 


10 


10 


II 


II 


12 12 


13 


13 


14 


14 


42/- 


43 - 





10 9 


I 


I 6 8 


12 


9 


13 6 


10 


15 


II 


16 6 


12 18 


13 


19 6 


IS 


I 


43/- 


44- 





II 


I 


2 


8 


16 


9 


18 


II 





12 


2 


13 4 


14 


6 


15 


8 


44/- 


45,- 





II 3 




2 6 


9 





10 


2 6 


II 


5 


12 


7 6 


13 10 


14 


12 6 


15 


IS 


45/- 


46- 





II 6 




3 


9 


4 


10 


7 


II 


10 


12 


13 


13 16 


14 


19 


16 


2 


46/- 


47jL 





II 9 




_3j__ 


__9_ 


8 


10 


II 6 


II 


IS 


12 


18 6 


14 2 


_1S_ 


_s_l 


16 


9 


47/- 


j J'er'cwt. 


./ri-. 


« 


vt. 


cwt. 


CTC/Z". 


czat 


cwt. 


C7Vt cwt. 


cwt. 


Per 


TTf'.' 7 


2 




8 




Q 




ro 




ri 




[2 


13 


14 




C5 


czvt. 




i. 


S. (I. 


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X 


s. d. 


X 


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£s.d. 


£ 


s. d. 


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J. d. 




2 1,'- 


7 


17 6 


8 


8 


9 


9 


10 


10 


II 


II 


12 


12 


13 13 


14 


14 


IS 


IS 


21/- 


22/- 


S 


5 


8 


16 


9 


18 


II 





12 


2 


13 


4 


14 6 


15 


8 


16 


10 


22/- 


8 


12 6 


9 


4 


10 


7 


II 


10 


12 


13 


13 


16 


14 19 


16 


2 


17 


5 


23/- 


"^24;- 


9 





9 


12 


10 


16 


12 





13 


4 


14 


8 


15 12 


16 


16 


18 





24/- 


25/- 


9 


7 6 


10 





II 


S 


12 


10 


13 


15 


m 





16 5 


17 


10 


18 


15 


25/- 


26- 


9 


15 


10 


8 


II 


14 


13 





14 


6 


IS 


12 


16 18 


18 


4 


19 


10 


26/- 


! 27/- 


10 


2 6 


10 


16 


12 


3 


13 


10 


14 


17 


16 


4 


17 II 


18 


18 


20 


S 


27/- 


i|28- 


10 


10 


II 


4 


12 


12 


14 





IS 


8 


16 


16 


18 4 


19 


12 


21 





21/- 


1 ^9'; 


10 


17 6 


II 


12 


13 


I 


14 


10 


IS 


19 


17 


8 


18 17 


20 


6 


21 


IS 


29/- 


1 30/- 


II 


5 


12 





13 


10 


15 





16 


10 


18 





19 10 


21 





22 


10 


30/- 


31/ 


II 


12 6 


12 


8 


13 


19 


IS 


10 


17 


I 


18 


12 


20 3 


21 


14 


23 


S 


31/- 


32/ 


12 





12 


16 


14 


8 


16 





17 


12 


19 


4 


20 16 


22 


8 


24 





32/- 


33/- 


12 


7 6 


13 


4 


14 


17 


16 


10 


18 


3 


19 


16 


21 90 


23 


2 


24 


15 


33/- 


34/ 


12 


IS 


13 


12 


IS 


6 


17 





18 


14 


20 


8 


22 2 


23 


16 


25 


10 


3V- 


35(- 


13 


2 6 


14 





IS 


IS 


17 


10 


19 


S 


21 





22 15 


24 


10 


26 


S 


35/- 


36/- 


13 


10 


14 


8 


16 


4 


18 





19 


16 


21 


12 


23 8 


25 


4 


27 





36/- 


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Workmen's 
Compensation Act 

[60 & 61 Vict. Ch. 37.] 
ARRANGEMENT OF SECTIONS. 



1. Liability of certain employers to workmen for 

injuries 

2. Time for taking proceedings. 

3. Contracting out. 

4. Sub-contracting. 

5. Compensation to workmen in case of bankruptcy 

of employer. 

6. Recovery of damages from stranger. 

7. Applications of Act and definitions. 

8. Application to workmen in employment of 

Crown. 

9. Provision as to existing contracts. 

10. Commencement of Act and short title. 
Schedules. 



Workmen's Compensation Aet^ 1897. 

[60 & 61 Vict. Ch. 37.] 

An Act to amend the Law with respect to Compensation to 
Workmen for accidental Injuries suffered in the course of 
their EmploymeDt [6th August, 1897.] 

E it enacted by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by 
aod with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and 
Temporcd, and Commons, in this present Parliament 
assembleil, and by the authority of the same as fallows : — 

L — (1.) If*in any employment to which this Act applies 
personal injury by accident arising out of and in the course of 
the employment is caused to a workman, his employer shall, 
subject as herein-after mentioned, be liable to pay compensa- 
tion in accordance with the first Schedule to this Act. 
(2.) Provided that :~ 

(a.) The employer shall not be liable under the Act in 
I expect of any injur}^ which does not disable the work- 
n-an Ibr a period of at least two weeks from earning full 
wages at the work at which he was employed ; 
(6.) When the injury was caused by the personal negligence 
or wilful ad of the employer, or of .«ome person for whose 
act or default the employer is responsible, nothing in this 
Act sliidl affect any civil liability of the employer, but in 
that case the workman may, at his option, either claim 
compensation under this Act, or take the same proceed- 
ings as were open to him before the commencement of 
this Act; but the employer shall not be liable to pay 
compensation for injury to a workman by accident arising 
out of and in the course of the employment both inde- 
I endeutly of andalso under this Act,and shall not be liable 
to any proceedings independently of this Act, except in 
case of such personal negligence or wilful act as aforesaid; 
(c.) Li it is proved that the injury to a workman is 
attributable to the serious £!nd wilful misconduct ot that 
workman, any comipensation claimed in respect of that 
injury shall be disallowed. 
(3.) If any question arises in any proceedings under this 
Act as to the liability t© pay compensation under this Act 
(including any question as to whether the employment is one 
to which this Act applies), or as to the amount or duration 



3 

of compensation under this Act, the question, if not settled 
by agreement, shall subject to the provisioDS of the First 
Schedule to this Act, be settled by arbitration, in accord- 
ance with the Second Schedule to this Act. 

(4.) If, within the time herein- after in this Act limited for 
taking proceedings, an ^ictiorl is brought to recover damages 
independently of this Act for injury caused by any accident, 
and it is determined in such action that the injury is one for 
whicli the employer is not liable in such action, but that he 
would have been liable to pay compensation under the pro- 
visions of this Act, the action shall be dismissed; but the 
court in which the action is tried shall, if the plaintiff shall 
so choose, proceed to assess such compensation, and shall be 
at liberty to deduct from such compensation all the costs 
which, in its judgment, have been caused by the plaintiff 
bringing the action instead of proceeding under this Act. 

In any proceedings under this subsection, when the court 
assesses the compensation it shall give a certificate of the 
compensation it has awarded and the directions it has given 
as to the deduction for co^its, and such certificate shall have 
the force and effect of an award under this Act. 

(5.) Nothing in this Act shall affect any proceeding for 
a fine under the enactments relating to mines, or factories, or 
the application of any such fine, but if any such fine or any 
part thereof, has been applied for the benefit of the person 
Injured, the amount so applied shall be taken into account in 
estimating the compensation under this Act 

2. — (1.) Proceedings for the recovery under this Act of com- 
pensation for an injury shall not be maintainable unless notice 
of the accident has been given as soon as practicable after 
the happening thereof and before the workman has voluntar- 
ily left the employment in which he was injured, and unless 
the claim for compensation with respect to such accident 
has been made within six months from the occurrence of the 
accident causing the injury, or, in case of death within six 
months from the time of death. Provided always that the 
want of or any defect or inaccuracy in such notice shall not 
be a bar to the maintenance of such proceedings.if it is found 
in the proceedings for settling the claim th it the employer is 
not prejud'ced in his defence by the want, defect, or inaccuracy 
or that such want, defect, or inaccuracy was occasioned by 
mistake or other reasonable cause. 



4 

(2.) Notice in respect of an injury under this Act thall 
give the name and address of the person injured, and shall 
state in ordinary language the cause oi the injury and the 
date at which it was sustained, and shaU be served on the 
employer, or, if there is more than one employer, upon one 
of such employers. 

(3.) The notice may be served by delivering the same te 
or at the residence or place of business of tlie person on 
whom it is to be served. 

(4.) The notice may also be served ly post by a registered 
letter addressed to the person on whom it is to be served at 
his last known place of residence or placr^ of business, an! if 
served by post shall be deemed to have been served at the 
time when the letter containing the sam'e • would have been 
delivered in the ordinary course of post, and in proving the 
service of such notice it shall be sufficient to prove that, the 
notice was properly addressed and registered. 

(5.) Where the employer is a body of persons corporate or 
unincorporate, the notice may also be served by delivering 
the same at, or by sending it by post in a registered letter 
addressed to the employer at, the office, or, if there be more 
than one office, any one of the offices of such body. 

3. — (1.) If the Registrar of Friendly Societies, after taking 
steps to ascertain the views of the employer and workmen, 
certifies that any scheme of compensation, benefit, or insuiance 
for the word men of an employer in any employment, whether 
or not such scheme includes other emp'oyers and their work- 
men, is on the whole not less favourable to the general body 
of workmen and their dependents than the provisions of this 
Act, the employer may, until the certificate is revoked, con- 
tract with any of those workmen that the provisions of the 
scheme shall be substituted for the provisions of this Act, and 
thereupon the employer shall be liable only in accordance 
with tlie scheme, but save as aforesaid, this Act shall apply 
notwithstanding any contract to the contrary made after the 
commencement of this Act. 

(2.) The registrar may give a certificate to expire at the 
end of a limited period not less than five years. 

(3.) No scheme shall be so certified Avhicli contains an 
obligation upon the workmen to join the scheme as a condi- 
tion of their hiiing. 

(-*•.) If complaint is made to the Re gists ar uf h'liendly 
Societies by oi on behalf of the workmen of any employer that 



5 
tbe provisions of aDy scheme are no longer on the whole so 
favourable to the general body of workmen of such employer 
and their dependents as the provisions of this Act or that the 
provisions of such scheme are being violated, or that the 
scheme is not being fairly administered, or that satisfactory 
reasons exist for revoking the certificate, the registrar shall 
examine into the complaint,, and, if satisfied that good cause 
exist for such complaint, shall, unless the cause of complaint 
is removed, revoke the certificate. 

(5.) When a certificate is revoked or expires any moneys 
or securities held for the purpose of the scheme shall be 
distributed as may be arranged between tho employer and 
workmen, or as may be determined by the Registrar of 
Friendly Societies in the event of a difference of opinion. 

(6.) Whenever a scheme has been certified as aforesaid, it 
shall be the duty of the employer to answer all such inquiries 
and to furnish all such accounts in regard to the scheme as 
may be made or required by the Registrar of Friendly 
Societies. 

(7.) The Chief Registrar of Friendly Societies shall include 
in his annual report the particulars of the proceedings of the 
Registrar under this Act. 

4. Where, in an employment to which this xlct applies, the 
undertakers as herein-after defined contract with any person 
for the execution by or under such contractor of any work 
and the undertakers would, if such work were executed by 
workmen immediately employed by them, be liable to pay 
compensation under this Act to those workmen in respect of 
any accident arising out of and in the course of their employ- 
ment, the undertakers shall be liable to pay to any workmen 
employed in the execution of the work any compensation, 
which is payable to the workman (whether under this Act or 
in respect of personal negligence or wilful act independently 
of this Act) by such contractor, or would be so payable if such 
Gontj actor were an employer to whom this Act applies. 

Provided that the undertakers shall be entitled to be 
indemnified by any other person who would have been liable 
indeptnuently of this section. 

This section shall not apply to any contract with any 
person for the execution by or under such contractor of any 
work which is merely ancillary or incidental to, and is no part 
of, or process in, the trade or business carried on by such 
undertakers respectively. 



6 

5. — (1.) Where any employer becomes liable urider this 
Act to pay compensation in respect of any aceident, and is 
entitled to any sum from insurers in respect of the amount 
due to a workman under such liability, then in the event of 
the employer becoming bankrupt, or making a composition 
or arrangement with his creditors, or if the employer is a 
company of the company having commenced to be wound up, 
such workman shall have a first charge upon the sum afore- 
said for the amount so due, and the judge of the county 
court may direct the insurers to pay such sum into the Post 
Office Savings Bank in the name of the registrar of such 
court, and order the same to be invested or applied in accord- 
ance with the provisions of the First Schedule hereto with 
reference to the investment in the Post Office Savings Bank 
of any sum allotted as compensation, and those provisions 
shall apply accordingly. 

(2.) In the application of this section to Scotland, the 
words " have a first charge upon " shall mean '* be preferenti- 
ally entitled to." 

6. Where the injury for which compensation is payable 
under this Act was caused under circumstances creating a 
legal liability in some person other than the employer to pay 
damages in respect thereof, the workman may, at his option, 
proceed, either at law against that person to recover 
damages, or against his employer for compensation under 
this Act, but not against both, and if compensation be paid 
under this Act the employer shall be entitled to be indemni- 
fied by the said other person. 

7. — (1.) This Act thall apply only to employmeut by tlie 
undertakers as herein-after defined, on or in or about a rail- 
way, factory, mine, quarry, or engineering work, and to 
employment by the uiidertakers as herein -after defined on in 
or about any building which exceeds thirty feet in height, 
and is either being constructed or repaired by means of a 
scaffolding, or being demolished, or on which machinery 
driven by steam, water, or other mechanical power, is being 
used for the purpose of the construction, repair, or demolition 
thereof. 

(2.) In this Act— 

"Railway" means the railway of any railway companv to 
which the Regulation oi Railways Act, 1873, appliep, 
and include s a light railway made under the Light 
Railways Act, 1896 ; and " railway " and " railway 



1 

company" have the same meaning as in the said 
Acts of 1873 and 1896 : 

" Factory " has the same meaning as in the Factory and 
Workshop Acts, 1878 to 1891, and also includes 
any dock, wharf, quay, warehouse, machinery, or 
plant, to which any provision of the Faclory Acts 
is applied by the Facfcoiy and Workshop Act. 1895 
and every laundr}'^ worked by steam, water or other 
mechanical power: 

" Mine " means a mine to which the Coal Mines 
Eegulation Act 1887, or the Metalliferous Mines 
Regulation Act 1872, applies: 

"Quarry" means a quarry under the Quarries Act, 1894: 
" Engineering work '' means any work oT construction or 
alteration or repair of a railroad, harbour, dock, 
canal, or sewer, and includes any other work for 
the construction, alteration, or repair of which 
machinery driven by steam, water, or other 
mechanical power is used: 

" Undertakers " in the case of a railway means the 
railway company; in the case of a factory, quarry 
or laundry means the occupier thereof within the 
meaning of the Factory and Workshop Acts, 1878 
to 1895; in the case of a mine means the owner 
thereof within the meaning of the Coal Mines 
Kegulation Act, 1887, or the Metalliferous Mines 
Regulation Act, 1872, as the ca^e may be, and in 
the case of an engineering work means the person 
undertaking the construction, alteration, or repair; 
and in the case of a building means the persons 
undertaking the construction, repair, or demolition: 

"Employer" includes any bodj/ of persons corporate, or 
unincorporate and the legal personal representative 
of a deceased employer: 

"Workman" includes every person who is engaged in an 
employment to which this Act applies, whether by 
way of manual labour or otherwise, and whether 
his agreement is one of service or apprenticeship or 
otherwise, and is expressed or implied, is oral or in 
writing. Any reference to a workman who has 
been injured shall, where the workman is dead, 
include a reference to his legal personal representa- 



tive or to his dependants, or other person to whom 
compensation is payable: 

"Dependants " means — 

(a) in England and Ireland, such members of the 
workman's family specified in the Fatal Accidents 
Act, 1846, as were wholly or in part dt pendi nt 
on the earnings of the workman at the time of 
his death; and 
(h) in Scotland such of the persons entitled, accord- 
ing to the law of Scotland to sue the employer 
for damages or solatium in respect of the death 
of the workman, as were wholly or in part 
dependent on the earnings of the workman at 
the time of his death. 
(3.) A workman employed in a factory which is a ship- 
building yard shall not be excluded from this Act by reason 
only that the accident arose outside the yard in the course of 
his work upon a vessel in any dock, river, or tidal water near 
the yard. 

8. — (1.) This Act shall not apply to persons in the naval 
or military seivice of the Crown, but otherwise shall apply 
to any employment by or under the Crown to which this 
Act would apply if the employer were a private person. 

(2.) The Treasury may, by warrant laid before Parliament, 
modify for the purposes of this Act their wan ant made under 
section one of the Superannuation Act, 1887, and notwith- 
standing anything in that Act, or any such warrant, may 
frame a scheme with a view to its being certified by the 
Registrar of Friendly Societies under this Act. 

9. Any contract existing at the comnaencement of this Act, 
whereby a workman relinquishes any right to compensation 
from the employer for personal injury atising out of and in 
the course of his employment, shall not for the purposes of 
this Act, be deemed to continue after the time at which the 
workman's contract of service would determine if notice of the 
determination thereof were given at the commencement of 
this Act. 

10. — (1.) This Act shall come into operation on the first 
day of July one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight. 

(2.) This Act may be cited as the Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act. 1897* 



9 

SCHEDULES. 
FIKST SCHEDULE. 

Scale and Conditions of Employment. 

Scale. 

(1.) The amount of compensation under this Act shall be — 

{a) where death results fro; a the injury — 

(i.) if the workman leaves any dependants wholly 
dependent upon his earnings at the time of his 
death, fi sum equal to his earnings in the em|.jloy- 
ment of the ^ame employer during the three 3ears 
next preceding the iujnry, or the sum of one hundred 
and fifty pouiids, whichever of tlio^e sums is the 
larger, but not exceeding in any case three 
hundred pounds, provided that the an.ount of any 
weekly payments made under this Act shall be 
deducted froui such sum, and if the period of the 
workman's employment by the said employer has 
been less than the said three years, then the 
amount of his earnings during the said three years 
shall be deemed to be 156 times his average 
weekly earnings during the period of his actual 
employment unaer tlie said empK^yer; 

(ii.) if the workman does not leave any such depen- 
dants, but leaves any dependants in part dependent 
upon his earnings at the time of his d- ath, such 
sum, not exceeding in any case tl.e amount payable 
under the foicgoiiig provisions, as may be agreed 
upo: , or, in default of agreement, may be deter- 
mined, on arbitration under this Act, to be reason- 
able and prcfiortio ate to ihe injury to the said 
dependants; and 

(iii.) if he leaves no depeuilants, the reasonable 
expenses oHjis medico! atendance and burial, not 
exceeding ten pounds; 

(6.) where total or piutial incapicity for work results 
from the injury, a weekly payment ( uring the 
iijcapacity after the second week not exceeding 
fifty percent, of his average weekly earnings during 
the previovs twelve months, if he has l.ieen so long 
emp'ojed, but if not, then for any less period 



10 

during which he has been in the employment of 
the ^^ame employer, such weekly payment not to 
exceed one pound. 

(2.) In fixing the amount of the weekly payment, regard 
shall be had to the difference between the amount of the 
average weekly earnings of the workman before th« acci- 
dent and the average amount which he is able to earn after 
the accident, and to any payment not being wages which he 
may receive from the employer in respect of his injury dur- 
ing the period of his incapacity. 

(3.) Where a workman has given notice of an accident, he 
shall, if so required by the employer submit himself f -r 
examination by a duly qualified medical practitioner provide(i 
and paid by the employer, and if he refuses to submit him- 
self to such examination, or in any way obstructs the same, 
his right to compensation, and any proceeding under this 
Act in relation to compensation, shall be suspended until 
such examination takes place. 

(4.) The payment shall, in case of death, be made to the 
legal personal representative of the workman, or if he has 
no legal pergonal repiesentative, to or for the benefit of his 
dependants, or, if he leaves no dependants, to the person to 
whom the expenses are due, and if made to the legal personal 
representative shall be paid by him to or for the benefit of 
the dependants or other person entitled thereto under this 
Act. 

(5.) Any C[uestion as to \\ho is a dependant, or as to the 
amount payable to each dependant, shall, m default of agree- 
ment, be settled by arbitration under this Act. 

(6.) The sum allotted as compensation to a dependant may 
be invested or otherwise applied for the benefit of the person 
entitled thereto, as agreed, or as ordered by the committee 
or other arbitrator. 

(7.^ Any sum which is agreed or is ordered by the 
committee or arbitrator to be invested may be invested in 
whrle or in part in the Post Office Savings Bank by the 
registrar of the county court in his name a- registrar. 

(8.) Any sum to be so invested may be invested in the 
purchase of an annuity from the National Debt Ci^minis- 
sioners through the Post Office Savings Bank, or be accepted 
by the Postmaster- General as a deposit in the name of the 



registrar as sncb, nnd the provisions of any statute or regula- 
tions respectiuo: the limits of deposits in savings bank, and 
the declaratior. to be made by a depositor, shall not apply to 
such sums. 

(9.) No part of any snoney invested in the name of the 
registrar of any coui:ity court under the Post Office Savings 
Bank under this A' t shall be paid out, except upon authority 
addressed to the Postmaster-General by the Treasury or by 
the judge of the county court. 

(10.) Any person deriving any benefit from any moneys 
invested in a Po.^t Office Savings Bank under the provisions 
of this Act mav, nevertheless, open an account in a Post 
Office Savings Bank or in any other savings bank in his own 
name without being liable to any penalties impeded by any 
statute or regulations in respect of the opening of accounts 
in two savings banks, or of two accounts in the same savings 
bank. 

(11.) Any workmen receiving weekly payments under this 
Act shall, if so required by the employer, or by any person 
by whom the employer is entitled under this Act to be 
indemnified, from time to time submit himself for examina- 
tion by a duly qualified medical practitioner provided and 
paid by the enq^loyer, or such other perstn; but if the work- 
man objects to an ex;.mination by that medical practitioner 
or i- dissatisfied by the certificate of sucli practitioner upon 
his condition when communicated to liini; he may submit 
himself for examination to one of the medical practitioners 
appointed for the purposes of this Act, as mentioned in the 
L econd Schedule to this Act, and the certificate of that 
medical practitioner as to the condition of the workman at 
the time of the examinaticn shall be given to the employer 
and woikman, anrl sha'l be conclusive evidence of that con- 
dition. If the worktur.n lefuses to submit himself to such 
examij;ation, or in any way obstructs the same, his right to 
such weekly payments shall be suspended until such examina- 
ti< n has taken place. 

(12.) Any weekly payment may be reviewed at theiequest 
either of the employer or of the workman, and on such 
review may be ended, diminished or increased, subject to the 
maximum above provided, and the amount of payment 



12 

fhall, in flefaiilt of agreement, be settled by arbitration 
under this Act. 

(13.) Where any weekly payment has been continued for 
not less than six months, the liability therefore may, on the 
application by or on behalf of the employer, be redeemed by 
the payment of a lump sum, to be settled, in default of 
agreement, by arbitration under this Act, and such lump 
sum may be ordered by the committee or arbitrator to be 
invested or otherwise applied as above mentioned. 

(14.) A weekly payment, or a sum paid by way of redemp- 
tion thereof, shall not be capable of being assigned, charged, 
or attached, and shall not pass to any other person by 
operation of law, nor shall any claim be set off against the same. 

(15.) Where a scheme certified under this Act provides for 
payment of compensation by a friendly society, the provi- 
sions of the proviso to the first subsection of Section eight, 
section sixteen, and section forty-one of the Friendly Societies 
Act, 1896, shall not apply to such society in respect of such 
scheme. 

(16.) In the application of this schedule to Scotland, the 
expression " registrar of the county court " means "sheriff 
clerk of the county," and 'judge of the county court" means 
" sheriff." 

(17.) In the application of this Act to Ireland the pro- 
visions of the County Officers and Courts (Ireland) Act, 1877, 
with respect to money deposited in the Post Office Savings 
Bank under that Act ^hall apply to money invested in the 
Post Office Savin o^s Bank under this Act. 



SECOND SCHEDULE. 
Arbiteation. 

The following provisims shall apply for settling any 
matter which under this Act is to be settled by arbitration — 

(1.) If any committee, representative of an employer and 
his workmen exists with power to settle matters under this 
Act in the case of the employer and workmen, the matter 
shall, unless eiiher party objects, by notice in writing sent to 
the other party before the committee meet to consider the 
matter, be settled by the arbitration of such committee, or be 
referred by them in their discretion to arbitration as herein- 
after provided. 

(2.) If either party so objects, or there is no such com.mittee, 
or the committee so refers the matter or fails to settle the 



13 
Diatter within three months from the date of the claim, the 
matter shall be settled by a single arbitrator agreed on by 
the parties, or in the absence of agreement by the county 
court judge, according to the procedure prescribed by rults 
of court, or if in England the Lord Chancellor so aiit horisrs, 
according to the like procedure, by a single arbitrator 
appointed by such county court judge. 

(3.) Any arbitrator appointed by the county coutt judge 
shall for the purposes of this Act, have all the powers of a 
county court judge, shall be paid oat of moneys to be 
provided by Parliament in accordance with regulations to be 
made by the Treasury. 

(4.) The Arbitration Act, 1889, shall Dot apply to any 
arbitration under this Act; but an arbitrator may, if he thinks 
fit, sumbit aiiy question of law for the decision of the county 
court judge, and the decision of the judge on any question 
of law either on such submission, or in any case where he 
himself settles the matter under this Act, shall be final, 
unless within the time and in accordance with the conditions 
prescribed by rules of the Supreme Court either party 
appeals to the Court of Appeal, and the county court judge or 
the arbitrator appointed by him, shall, for the purpose of an 
arbitration under this Act, have the same powers of procur- 
ing the attendance of witnesses and the production of docu- 
ments as if the claim for compensation had been made by 
plaint in the county court 

(5.) Eules of court may make provision for the appearance 
in any arbitration under this Act of any party by some other 
person. 

(6.) The costs of and incident to the arbitration and pro- 
ceedings connected therewith shall be in the discretion of the 
arbitrator. The costs, whether before an arbitrator or in the 
county court, shall not exceed the limit prescribed by rules 
of court, and shall be taxed in manner prescribed by those 
rules. 

(7.) In the case of the death or refusal or inability to act 
of an arbitrator, a Judge of the High Court at Chambers 
may, on the application of any party, appoint a new 
arbitrator. 

(8.) Where the amount of compensation under this Act 
shall have been ascertained, or any weekly payment varied, 
or any other matter decided, under this Act, either by a 
committee or by an arbitrator or by agreement, a 



H 
memorandum thereof shall be sent, in manner prescribed b}? 
rules of court, by thf^ said committee or arbitrator orjby any 
party interested to the registrar of the county court for the 
district in which any persoa entitled to such compensation 
resides, who shall, subject to such rules, on being satisfied as 
to its genuineness, record such memorandum in a special 
register without fee, and thereup .n the said memorandum 
shall for all purposes be enforcea'^le as a county court judg- 
ment. Provided that the county court judge may at any 
time rectify such register. 

(9.) Where any matter under this Act is to be done in a 
county court, or by to or before a judge or registrar of a 
county court, then, uule^s the contrary intentiou appear, the 
same shall, subject to rules of court, be done m, or by to or 
before the judge or registrar of, the county court of the dis- 
trict in which all the parties concerned reside, or it they re- 
side in different districts the district in which the accident 
out of which the said matter arose occurred, without p' ejudice 
to any transfer in manner piovided by rules of court. 

(10.) The duty of a county court judge under this Act, or of 
an arbitrator appointed by him, shall, subject to rules of 
court, be part of the duties of the county court, and the 
officers of the court shall act accordingly, and rules of court 
may be made both for any purpose for which this Act 
authorises rules of cour-t to be made, and also generally for 
carrying into effect this Act so far as it affects the county 
court, or an arbitrator appointed by the judge of the county 
court, and procee lings in the county court or before any such 
arbitrator, and such rules may, in E ^glan i, be made by the 
five judges of the county courts appointed for the making of 
rules under section one hundred and sixty-four of t'le County 
Courts Act, 1888, and when allowed by the Lord Chancellor-, 
as provided by that section, shall have full effect without 
any further consent. 

(11.) No court fee .-hall be payable by any party in respect 
of any procteding under this Act in the county court prior 
to the award. 

(12.) Any sum awarded as compensation shall be paid on 
the receipt of the person to whom it is payable under any 
agreement or award, and his solicitor or agent shall not be 
entitled to recover from him, or to claim a hen on, or deduct 
any amount for costs from, the said sum awarded 
except such sum as may be awarded by the 



is 

arbitrator or county court judge, on an applicadon made by 
either party to determine the amount of costs to ha paid to 
the said solicitor or agent, such sum to be awa'-ded subject 
to taxation and to the scale of costs prescribed by rules of court. 

(13.) The Secretary of State may appoint legally qualified 
medical practitioners for the purpose of this A.ct, and any 
committee, arbitrator, or judge may, sul)ject to rr-gulations 
made by the Secretary of State and the Treasury, appoint 
any such practitioner to report on any matter which seems 
material to ar.y question arising in the arbitration; and the 
expense of any such medical practitioner shall, subject to 
Treasury regulations, be paid out of moneys to be provided 
by Parliament. 

(14.) In the application of this schedule to Scotland — 

(a.) "Sheriff" shall be substituted for "county court 
judge," "sheritf court" for "county court" "action" for 
"plaint," "sheriff clerk" for "registrar of the county 
court," and "act of sederunt " for " rules of court:" 

(6.) Any award or agreement as to compensation under 
this Act may be competently recorded for execution in 
the books of council and session or sheriff court books, 
and shall be enforceable io like manner as a recorded 
decree arbitral: 

(c.) Any application to the sheriff as arbitrator shall be 
heard, tried, and determined summarily in the manner 
pj^ovided by the fifty-second section of the Sheriff Couits 
(Scotland) Act, 1876, save only that parties may be 
represented by any person authorised in writing to 
appear for them, and subject to the declaration that it 
shall be competent to either party within the time and in 
accordance with the conditions prescribed by act of 
sederunt to acquire the sheriff to state a case on any 
question of law determined by him, and his decision 
thereon in such case may be submitted to either division 
of the Court of Session, who may hear and determine tlie 
same finally, and remit to the Sheriff with instruction as 
to the judgment to be pronounced. 

(15.) Paragraphs four and seven of this schedule shall not 
apply to Scotland. 

(16.) In the application of this schedule to Ireland the 
expression "county court judge" shall include the recorder of 
any city or town. 



ADVERTISEMfiNtS 



ANDREW COCHRANE 
Grocer & 'Wine Merchant. 



iD.A.LicEia?ia:_ 



Exceptional Value in Groceries and Provisions. 

Splendid Value in Tea at 1/4, 1/7, and 1/10 per lb. 
Finest Old Malt Wbisky at :;/ per bottle. 

Choice Selection of Wines and Spirits at Lowest Prices. 

BUY YOUR BOOTS & SHOES 

AT 



the Leading Boot and Shoe Warehouse, 

26 High Street, Dalkeith. 



Their Stock is the Largest and Best Selected in the 
District, comprisiog ail the Leading Styles and Shapes in 
Ladies and Gent.'s foot gear. 

Evening Shoes and Slippers in Up-to-Date Fashions. 
Also Children's Goods in great Variety. All Goods Sold at 
Keenest Cash Prices. 

Eepairs Neatly and Promptly Executed. 



< 



jT O OT m 10 » ^ 



SCOTTISH FAIRS AND TRYST^—ConUnued. 



Fortrose, cattle, etc., Monday before Beaiily 
Fort-William, horses and hiring, 4 Wed. 
Fyvie, 3 Thursday 
Gatehouse, cattle, etc., Saturday after 2 

Fri.; hirinGc, Sat. before Castle-Douglas 
Gifford Tryst, last Tuesday 
Glasgow, horses, every Wednesday 
Gleniivet, d^^v l-^.'h.p 7;ni;';-r;-;ra 
Grautown, - ■ ' and hiring, 

Monday, ' :/ 

Haddington, ;,,, 3 Friday 

Hawick, hiring, 1 Tliurcday 
Huntly, liorses, 1 Wednesday ; cattle, 1 and 

3 Wednesdays 
Inverness, cattle, Friday after Beauly 
Jedbrngh, hiring, 1 Tuesday 
Keith, cattle, horses, and sheep, 1 Friday ; 

married servant's hiring, last Saturday 
Kelso, horses, 1, 2, and 3 Fri.; hiring, 1 Fri.; 

cattle, Monday, 6 and 20 
Kenmore, horses, etc., 1 Tuesday o s 
KUdaiy, cattle, horses, and sheep, Tuesday 

before Beauly 
Kinross, cattle, etc., 4. Monday 
Kirkwall, 1 Monday 
Kirriemuir, 1 Monday ; horses, 2 Friday 
Laurencekii'k, cattle, etc., Mon. weekly 

horses, Monday before Perth 
Lesmahagow, hiring, 2 Wednesday 
Lochgilphead, horses, 3 Thursday 
Lockerbie, pork, etc., 2 Thursday 
Longside, Thursday after, 3 Tuesday 
Markinch, cattle, etc., last Tuesday 
Maud, last Monday 
Meigle, 2 Wednesday 
Mekose, hiring, 1 Monday 
Mid-Calder, 2 Tuesday 
Milton (Eoss-shire), 2 Tuesday o s 
Mintlaw, 2 Tuesday 
Moffat, hiring, etc,, 3 Friday o s 
Moulin, horses, 1 Tuesday 
Muir of Ord. See Beauly 
Nairn, cattle, etc., Saturday after Beauly 
Newcastlefcon (Roxburgh), hiring, 2 Mon. 
Newton-Stewart, cattle, 2 Friday 
Newton St BosweUs, hiring, 1 Monday 
Oban, horses, etc., Tues. before 1 Thui's. 
Olrig, 2 Tuesday 
Peebles, hiring, 1 Tuesday 
Penicuik, hiring, 3 Friday 
Perlh, cattle and horse", 1 Friday 
Ehynie, cattle, Satm-day betbre 4 Monday 
Selkirk, hiring, 1 Wednesday 
Stirling, horses and cattle, 1 Friday ; horses, 

3 Friday 
Stow, hiring, 2 Tuesday 
Strathaven, 1 Thursday 
Strichen, cattle, 1 Thursday 
Stromness, 1 Wednesday 
Tarbert (Loch Fyne), horses and hiring 

Wednesday before Lochgilphead 
Thornhill (Perthshire), 2 Tuesday 
Udny Station, last Thursday 
Wigtown, cattle, 4 Friday 
'¥/ indygates, cattle, 2 Friday 
Wick,' last Friday 



APSIL. 



Abejrdeen (Old), last Thursday 
Abeffoyle, cattle, 3 Tuesday 



Aberlour, 1 Thursday 

Aboyue (Charlestown of), cattle and horses 

3 Thursday 
Alford, cattle, horses, etc. Tuesday 18 
Alness Bridge, horses and cattle, Wednesday 

previous to fii'st Amukee May marfset 
Alyth, 4 Wednesday 
Auchnagatt, 2 Thiursday 
Auchtermuchty, last Monday 
Ayr, last Friday ; hiring, 1 Tuesday 
Balloch, cattle, 27 ; if Sunday, then next day 
Barrhill, cattle, Thui-s. before 4 Friday 
Beauly, or Muir of Ord, 3 Wed., sheep only ; 

Thiu'sday, cattle and horses 
Biggar, horses, hii-ing, etc. , last Thursday 
Braemar, Castletown of, last Wednesday 
Brechin (Trinity Muir), cattle, 3 Wed. 
Camwath, 1 Wednesday 
Castle-Douglas, hoggets, Monday before 24 
Cornhill of Park, 2 Thursday 
Coupar- Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Craigievar, cattle, horses, and sheep, Friday 

before 3 Wednesday 
Crieff, cattle and hiring, 1 Tuesday 
Cupar-Fife, cattle and horses, 1 Tuesday 
Dalbeattie, 2 Tuesday 
Dalkeith, hking, 1 Thursday 
Dounby, horses and cattle, 2 Thursday 
Daymen, cattle, sheep, etc., last Wednesday 
Dufftov;n,eattle and sheep, 4 Thursday 
Dimfermline, cattle and horses, 3 Tuesday 
Dunkeld, general business, 5 ; if Saturday, 

Sunday, or Monday, then Tues. following 
Durris, 3 Tuesday 
Barlston, hu'ing, 1 Monday 
Echt, cattle and horses, 1 Monday 
Edinbm'gh, grit ewe and store sheep, 1 and 2 

Mondays 
Elgin, cattle, etc., 2 and last Fridays 
Ellon, 1 and 3 Mondays 
Falkii'k, hii-ing, 1 Thursday ; cattle, Thurs 

before 3 Friday ; tryst, last Tuesday 
Finstown, horses and cattle, 3 Monday 
Firth (Orkney), 3 Monday 
Fochabers, cattle, 4 Thursday 
Forfar, cattle and horses, 2 Wednesday 
Forres, cattle, etc., 1 and 3 Tuesdays 
Fortrose, 1 Wednesday, and 1 Monday before 
Beauly 

Fyvie, 3 Thursday 

Galstoa, 3 Thursday 

Girvan, cattle and hiring, 1 M onday 

Glamis, 1 Wednesday 

Glasgow, horses, 1 and 2 Wednesdays; Skeir, 
3 Friday 

Gleniivet, . day before Dufftown 

Golspie, cattle, Saturday, before Beauly 

Grantown, sheep, Thursday before 3 We4.; 
horses, cdttle, and sheep, Mon. after 3 Wed. 

Hamilton, cattle and hiring, 3 Friday 

House of Muir, grit ewes 1 and 2 Mon. 

Huntly, cattle, 1 and 3 Wednesdays 

Insch, cattle, etc., 4 Monday 

Invergordon, 2 Tuesday o g 

Inverness, ca,ttle, Friday after Beauly 

Islay (Bridgend)v cattle last Wednesday 

Jamima (Cromarty), 1 Tuesday 

Keith, cattle and horses, 1 Friday 

Kelso, cattle, Monday 3, and 17 

Kildary, Tuesday before Beauly 

Kilsyth, 2 Friday 

Kiiinesswood, 2 Tuesday o s 



SCOTTISH FAIRS AND TRYSTS— Conti7iited. 



Kirkcaldy (Links of), 3 Friday 

Kirkwall, 1 Monday 

Kirriemuir, 1 Monday 

Lanark, grit ewes and hoggs, Wednesday 

before 1 Monday ; plants, 2 Wednesday 
Langholm, 16; if Saturday, Sunday or 

Monday, then Tuesday following 
Larbert, cattle, last Wednesday 
Laurencekirk, cattle, etc., Mon weekly 
Leslie (Fife), 1 Tuesday o s 
Leven, 2 Wednesday o s 
Linlithgow, 3 Friday 
Longside, Thursday, after 3 Tuesday 
Maud, last Monday 
Maybole, 3 Thursday 
Meigle, 2 Wednesday 
Mintlaw, 2 Tuesday 
Muir of Ord. See Beauly 
Nairn, cattle, etc., Satirrday after Beauly 
Newcastleton (Roxburgh), hiring, 2 Friday 
Newton-Stewart, cattle and hirmg, 2 Friday 
Oban, hiring and general business, 2 Tuesday 
Perth, cattle and horses, 1 Friday 
Khynie, cattle, Saturday before 4 Monday 
Rothes, Thursday before 3 Friday 
Rothie, 2 Monday 
St Andrews, 2 Monday 
Sanquhar, cattle, 3 Friday 
Selkirk, luring, 5 

Slamannan, horses, cattle, etc., 3 Tuesday 
Stirling, horses and cattle, 1 Friday ; horses, 

3 Friday 
Stranraer, cattle, 3 Friday 
Strathaven, hiring, cattle, and horses, ] 

Thursday 
Strichen, cattle, 1 Thursday 
Stromness, 1 Wednesday 
Turriff, cattle, 2 and 4 Wednesday 
Wick, last Friday 
Wigtown, cattle, 4 Friday. 



MAY. 



Aberdeen, hiring, Fridays before and after 26 
Aberdour, New (Aberdeenshire), Monday 

week before 26 
A.berlour, 2 Thm-sday 
Airdrie, last Tuesday 
Alloa, cattle, 2 Wednesday 
Alness Bridge, day after KUdary 
Alyth, cattle, sheep, and hiring, 3 Tuesday 
Annan, hiring', 1 Friday 
Arbroath, hiring, 26 if Saturday; if not, 

Satui-day after 
Ai'delve, cattle, Sat. after last Tuesday 
Auchterarder, cattle 1 Wednesday 
Banff, huing, etc., Friday before 28 
Bathgate, cattle and hiring, Wednesday after 

Whitsimday o s 
Beauly, or Muir of Ord, 2 Wed., sheep only, 

Thursday, cattle and horses 
Berwick, North, Tluusday, after Dunbar 
Blair of Athole, cattle, 3 Wednesday o s 
Blairgowrie, feeing, 2 Wed.; cattle, Tues. 

before old Whitsunday 
Callander, cattle, 16 ; if Saturday, Sunday, 

or Monday, then Tuesday following 
Campbelltown (Argyll), horses and cattle, 

2nd last Wednesday 
Carluke, cattle, 21 
Camwath, 1 Wednesday o s 



Castle-Douglas, hiring, 26 if Monday ; if not 

Monday after 
Clashmore, cattle, Monday after 1 Wed. 
CoU, Tuesday before Mull 
Colmonell, 1 Monday o s 
Comliill of Park. 2 'Phursday 
Coshieville, 1 Saturday 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep 3 Monday 
Crieff, general business, 1 Tuesday 
Cullen, cattle and horses, 3 Friday 
Cumbernald, , cattle, 2 I'hiirsday 
Cupar-Fife, cattle and horses, 1 Tues. 
Dalkeith, horses, Thur. after Rutherglen 
Deer (New), liiring, 26 if Thui'sday ; if not, 

Thursday, before 
Denny, cows, Wednesday before 12 
Dollar, 2 Monday 

Douglas, hiring, Friday after '\(\1iitsunday o s 
Dumfries, horses. Wed. before 26 ; hiring, 26 

if Wednesday ; if not, Wednesday after 
Dunbar, 26 if Tuesday ; if not, ] uesday after 
Dimdee, hiring, 26 if Tuesday or riday ; if 

not, I'uesday or Friday after 
Dunfermline, cattle and horses, 3 Tuesday 
Duns, hiring, 1 Tuesday 
Durris, 2 Tuesday 
Echt, hiring, 2 Monday 
Elgin, cattle, etc., 2 and last Fridays •, hiring, 

Friday before 26 
Ellon, cattle, etc., 1 and 3 Mondays ; feeing, 

I'uesday alter 11 
Falkirk, cattle and horses, 3 Thursday ; tryst, 
last Tuesday 

Fife-Keith, cattle, last Friday 

Fochabers, cattle, 4 '1 hm-sday 

Forfar, cattle and horses, 1 Wed. o s ; feeing, 
Saturday alter 26 

Glasgow, Mon. after 25; horses, 1 Wednesday 

Haddington tryst, Friday after 11 

Hawick, hiring, 17; if Sat. Sund. or Monday 
then Tuesday loUowing 

Hmitly, cattle, 1 and 3 Weds.; hiring, Thurs. 
before 26 

Inverness, hiring 26 if Friday, if not Friday 
before ; cattle Friday after Beauly 

Jedbm-gh, cattle and l»orses Tuesday after 26; 
hu-iug 16 if Tuesday; if not, Tuesday before 

Kelso, cattle Monday 1 and 15; hiring 1 Fri. 
Kilmarnock, cattle 2 Tuesday 
Kingussie, 1 uesday aiter Beauly 

Earlnntilloch, 2 Tuesday 

Langholm last 'I'uesday o s; hiring Wednesday 
before 26 

Lockerbie cattls 2 Thursday os 

Lurnsdcu la^t Friday 

Maucliline cows and horses Wed. after 18 

Melrose hu-ing 1 Monday 

Milnathort, cattle 1 Wednesday 

Montrose, Fiiday after Whitsunday o s 

Nairn, cattle etc. Satur. after Beauly; hiiiug 
I'hursday before 26 

Newcastleton, hiring Friday before 17 

Oban, cattle Monday before last Wednesday 

Paisley, 3 Thursday 

Peebles, lui-tng Tuesday before 12 

Peterhead, Friday before 26 

Pitlocliry, Satmday before Amurlee 

Renfrew, 3 Tuesday 

Rutherglen, cows and horses Fri. after 4 

Salcoats, cattle etc. last Thui-sday 

Sanquhar, general business 1 Friday o s 

Stirling, horses and cattle 1 and last Friday 



SCOTTISH FAIRS ANi) TRYSTS— Contmued. 



Stewarton, horses and cattle Monday before 1 
Tues.; horses Wed. before Eutherglen 
"Beltane" fair 

Stonehaven, hiring day before 26; if Monday 
Saturday belore 

Stranraer, cloth 1 Friday; cattle 3 Fric^ y 

Strathdon, 2 Friday 

Thomliill (Dumfiicsshire), 2 Tuesday s 

Wick, last Friday 

WigtcwTi, cattle 4 Friday 



JUNE. 

Aberdeen, wool last Thursday and Friday 
Aboyne (Charlestown of), last Wednesday 
Alness Bridge, cattle 2 Wt^dnesday 
Alyth, cattle and sheep 2 Tuesday o s 
Bannockburn, catUe and horses 3 Tuesday 
Barihill, sheep cattle and -r^ooI Thursday 

before 4 Friday 
Bathgate, cattle 4 Wednesday 
Biggar, horses etc. Thursday af. 11 
Brechin (Trinity Muir), begins 2 Wednesday 

and continues 3 days ; 1st day sheep ; 2nd 

cattle ; 3i d horses 
Oa.'stle-Douglas, horses Monday 23 
Clackmannan, 26; if Sat. fcun. or Mon., then 

Tuesday following 
Comhill of Park, 2 Thm'sday 
Crieff, hiring and cattle, 1 Tuesday 
Cumnock (Old), cattle Wed. after 6 
Cupar- Fife, cattle and horses 1 Tuesday 
Dunfermline, cattle and horses 3 Tuesday 
Duns, 1 Thursday 
Earlston, cattle and horses 29 
Eyemouth, 1 Thursday 
Falkirk tryst, last Tuesday 
Forfar, cattle Friday after 3 Thursday 
Gifford, sheep etc. 3 Tuesday 
Glasgow, horses 1 Wednesday 
Haddington, cattle sheep etc. 2 Filday 
Inverness, cattle Friday after Beauly 
Kelso, cattle, Monday 12 and 26 
Kinross, cattle horses and sheep 2 Monday 
Kirriemuir, Wednesday after Glamis 
Linlithgow, cattle and horses, 2 Friday 
Lockerbie, cattle 3 Thursday o s 
Melrose, cattle and horses, 1 Wednesday 
Renfrew, last Friday 
Eutherglen, Tuesday after 4 
Stranraer, cattle 3 Friday; horse 4Tjiursday 
Stromness, 1 Wednesday 
Swinton, 3 Thursday 
Thornhill (Dumfriesshire), last Friday 
Wigtown, cattle 4 Friday 



JULY. 

Aberdeen, wool, Thursday and Friday of 1st 

and second week 
Ardrossan, Tuesday before 2 Monday 
Atichtermuchty, cattle etc. 2 Monday 
Ayr, horses and cattle, Thursday before 2 

Monday 
Biggar, wool and shearers, 3 Thm-sday o s 
Boswells, St., 18 
Burntisland, 3 Friday 
Coldingham, 2 Tuesday o s 
Coupar-^^ngus, cattle, etc. 3 Thursday 
Crieff, hiring and cattle 1 Tuesday 



Cupar-Fife, cattle and horses, 1 Tuesday- 
Dundee (Stobb's), cattle sheep and horses^ 

Tuesday after 11 
Duns, cattle sheep etc. 2 Tuesday 
Falkirk, cattle and horses 1 Thursday ; tryst 

last Tuesday 
Forfar, cattle and horses Wednesday after 1 

2\iesday 
Glasgow, begins 2 Monday; horses 1 Wed. 
Greenock, 2 Thursday 
Hawick, wool Thur. after St Boswells 
Inverness, gTeat sheep and wool 2 2'hursday 

with Friday and Saturday; cattle after 3 

hursday; produce last Friday 
Inverurie, cattle Tuesday 18; feeing day 

before St Sairs 
Jedbmgh, wool Tuesday after EelUngham 

(Northumberland) wool fair which is held 

on Saturday alter 20 
Kelso, cattle, Monday 10 and 24 
Kinross, cattle horses and sheep, 4 Monday 
Langholm, 26; if Sat. Sim. or Mon, then 

Tuesday following 
Milnathort, cattle 1 Wednesday 
M off at, lambs, Friday after Langholm 
Nairn, cattle etc. Saturday after Beauly 
Pathhead, Thursday after 2 Monday 
Perth, cattle and horses, 1 Friday 
I'ort-Glasgow, Monday Tuesday Wednesday 

before 1 Thursday 
Eothesay, 3 Wednesday and Thursday 
Eutherglen, Friday after 25 
Selku-k, shearers, 15 
Stranraer, cartle 3 Friday 
Wigtown, cattle 4 Friday 
Yetholm, lambs, wool etc. 2 Wed 



AUGUST. 

Aberfoyle, lambs Friday before 3 Tuesday 

Alloa, hiring 2 Wednesday 

Alyth, cattle and sheep, 1 Tuesday 

Annan, shearers, 1 Friday 

Barrhill, sheep and cattle, Tliursday before 4 

I'riday 
Beauly or Muir of Ord, sheep Wednesday 

before Falkirk tryst; cattle and horses, 

Thursday 
Beith,30; if Sat. or Sun., then on Monday 
Brechin (Trinity Muir), sheep cattle and 

horses 2 Thursday 
Campbelltowu (Inverness-shire), 12; if Sat, 

Sun or Mon, then Tuesday following 
Carnwath, lambs etc. 2 Wednesday o s 
Castle-Douglas, Mon. before Lockerbie 
Cocliburnspath, 2 Tuesday 
Cornhill of Park, 2 Thursday 
Crieft', wool and general business, 1 Tue.sday 
Cupar-Fife, cattle and hiring, 1 Tuesday 
Douglas, horse etc. show, 2 Friday os 
Dufftown, cattle and sheep 4 Thursday 
Dumbarton, 2 Tuesday, and day after 
Dundee (First) cattle etc. 26; if Sat. Sim. or 

Monday then Tuesday following 
Dunfermline, cattle and horses 3 Tuesday 
Dims, lambs sheep and horses 26 
Elgin, cattle etc. 2 and last I^'ridays 
Falkirk (Tryst), lambs cattle and liorses 2 

Tues. and day after 
Falkland, cattle sheep horses 1 Thursday 
Glasgow, horses 1 Wednesday 



SCOTTISH FAIRS AKD TRYST8 -Continued. 



Huntly, cattle 1 and 3 Wednesdays 
James's, St., of Jedbiurgli (held near Kelso), 

horses cattle sheep etc. 5; if Sun. next day 
Jedbm-gh, hiring shearers 20 if Tuesday; if 

not, Tuesday before 
Kelso, cattle, Monday 7 21 
Lanark, horses Wednesday before 12; lambs, 

Monday and Tuesday before ; black-faced 

crosses and Cheviot lambs, a fortnight after 

lamb fair 
Lauder, lambs Friday before 12 
Linlithgow cattle and hoi'ses 1 Tuesday 
Lockerbie, lambs 13; but if Sat. Sun. or Mon. 

Tuesday after 
Longside, Thursday after 3 Tuesday 
Melrose, lambs 12; but if Sat. Sun. or Mon. 

Tuesday after 
Mihiathort, cattle, last Wednesday 
Musselburgh 2 Wednesday 
Paisley, cattle and horses, 2 Thursday 
Queensferry 2 Friday 
St Andi'ews cattle and hiring, 2 Tuesday 
Sanquhar general business, 1 Friday o s 
ThornhiU (Dumfriesshire), 2 Tuesday o s 
Wigtown, cattle 4 Friday 



SEPTEMBER 

Aboyne, horses cattle 3 Thursday 

Balloch, horses 15 

Biggar, horses, cattle etc. 14 if Thursday; if 

not Thursday after 
Brechin (Trinity Muir), sheep, cattle, horses 

Tuesday before last W'ednesday 
Castle-Douglas, horses and hiring 23 if Mon. 

if not Monday after 
Crieff, 1 Tuesday 

Cupar-Fife, cattle and horses 1 Tuesday 
Dumfries (Roodmas), horses 24 and 25 it 

Tues and Wed.; hiring Wednesday 
Dundee (Latter), cattle and horses 19 
Dunfermline, cattle etc. 3 Tuesday 
Duns, cattle and sheep 3 Tuesday 
Falkirk (Tryst), cattle and horses 2 Tuesday; 

sheep Monday before 
Glasgow, horses 1 Wednesday 
Hawick, tups and lambs, 21; if Sat. Sun. or 

Mon. then Tuesday following 
Inverness, cattle Friday after Beauly 
Kelso, ewes, 2 Monday; tups 2 Frida}-; cattle 

Monday, 4 and 18 
Langholm, sheep 18. If the 18th be a Simday 

the fair is held next day 
Newcastleton, lambs and ewes, Friday before 

2 Wednesday 
Perth, cattle sheep etc. 1 Fi-iday 
ThornhiU (Dumfriesshire), cattle show and 

sale, 3 Tuesday 
Wigtown, cattle 4 Friday 



OCTOBER 

Aberdeen (Old) Wednesday after 3 Tues. o s 

AUoa, hiring, 2 Saturday 

Annan, hiring servants, 4 Friday 

A>,T.', horses and cattle, 2 Thiusday; Iiii-ing 3 

Tuesday 
Bathgate, cattle 1 Wdnesdjiy 
Blairgowrie, cattle Wedue,^day before Falkiik 

Tryst 



Biggar, horses cattle and hiring last Thui's. 
Comrie, last Wednesday 
Crieff, horses cPvttle hiring 1 Tues. 
Cupar-Fife, cattle and horses, 1 Thurs. 
Dalkeith, hh'ing 2 Tiiursday; cattle horsesete. 

3 Tuesday 
Dumfries, hiring generally 3 Wednesday 
Dunfermluie, cattle and horses, 3 Tuesday 
Earlston, cattle and horses 3 Thursday ;hiring 

Mondaj' before 
Eyemouth, last Thursday 
Falkirk (I'ryst), cattle and horses 2 Tuesday 

and day after: sheep Mon. before; hiring, 

last Thursday 
Gifford, cattle sheep etc 1 Tuesday 
Haddington, autumn fair, Friday before 2 

Tuesday 
Hawick, horses and cattle, 3 Tuesday 
Kelso, cattle Monday, 2 and 16 
Kirkintilloch, 20; if Fri. Sat. Sun. or Mon. 

then Tuesday following 
Lanark, cattle and horses Tlim-sday after 

Falkhk Tryst 
Linton (East), cattle Thtu-sday before Falkirk 
Mekose, ewes and other stock Saturday alter 

1 Tuesday 
Mid-Calder, Fiiday after 2 Tuesday 
Moffat, hiring 1 Friday 
Neweastleton, draught ewes Thursday before 

2 Tuesday; cattle, last Friday 
Peebles, hiring 2 Tuesday 
Penicuik, Mring 1 Friday 
Perth, hiring cattle etc. 3 Friday 
Rutherglen, horses Wednesday before 1 Fri. 

of November 
Stirling, hii'ing 3 Fiiday 
Stranraer, horses, Mon. before 2 Thursday; 

cattle 3 Friday 
Swinton, 4 Tuesday 
Wigtown, cattle 4 Friday 

NOVEMBER. 

Aberdeen, hiring Fridays before and after 22 

Airdrie, 3 Tuesday 

Alloa, cattle 2 Wednesday 

Bathgate, cattle and hiring Wednesday after 

Martinmas o s 
Berwick (North), last Thursday 
Campbelltown (Argyll), horses, 3 Thursday 
Castle-Douglas, horses Monday before Dum- 
fries; hiring Alonday following 
Chimside, last Thursday 
Cockenzie, Friday after 1 Thursday 
Cupar- Fife, cattle and horses 1 Tuesday; 

hiring, 11; if Sat. Sun. or Mon. then 

Tuesday follovting 
Dumfries, horses Wed. before 22 ; liiring 22 if 

Wed.; if not Wed. after; pork every Wed. 
Dunbar, 22 if Tuesday; if not, Tuesday after 
Dimdee, hiring 22 if Tuesday or Friday; if not, 

Tuesday or Friday after 
Dunfermline, cattle and horses 3 Tuesday 
Duns, liii'ing 1 Tuesday; cattle, etc. 17; if Sat* 

Sun. or Mon. then Tuesday after 
Edinburgh (HuUow Fail'), sheep 2 Monday; 

cattle ami horses two following days; " Big 

Wednesday" cattle horses etc. 2 Wed. alter 

Hallow Fair 
Falkirk (Tryst), 1 Tuesday 
Greenock, 1 Tuesdeiy 



SCOTTISH FAIRS AND TMS'tQ—Omdmued. 

DECEMBEE. 



Auchterardcr, cattle 1 Wednesday 
Coupar- Angus, cattle and sheep 3 Monday 
Coupar-Fife, cattle and horses, 1 Tuesday 
Dumfries, pork every Wednesday 
Dunfermline, cattle and horses 3 Tuesday 
Elgin, cattle etc. 2 and last Friday 
Glasgow, horses 1 Wednesday 
Kelso, cattle Monday 11 and 25 
Kilbrachan, horses 1 Tuesday o s 
Lmark. general business last Tuesday 
Milnathort, Wednesday before Christmas 
Peebles (Siller), Tuesday before 12 
Perth, catttle and horses 2 Friday 
Rothie, 2 Monday 
Rothesay, cattle and horses Tuesday before 

Kilbai-chan 
Selkirk (Yule Fair), 19th 
Wick, last Friday 
Wigtown, cattle 4 Friday 



Glasgow, Wed. aft«r Martinms; horses 1 

Wed. and Wed. after 23 
Hawick, cattle and hii'ing, if 8; if St. Sun. 

or Mon. then Tuesday following 
Inverness, cattle Friday after Beauly; hiriug 

22 if Friday; if not, Friday after 
Jedburgh, cattle, horses and hiring 1 Tuesday 
Kelso, cattle Monday 13 and;27; huing 1 Fri. 
Lanark, cattle 1 Wednesday o s 
Linlithgow, cattle and horses 1 Friday 
Melrose, hiring 1 Monday; cattle and horses 

22; butifSat. Sun. orMon., then Tuesday 

after 
Milnathort, cattle 1 Wednesdy 
Newcastleton, hiring Fridy before 8; cattle 

3 Friday 
Perth, hiring Fridayafter Martinmas o s 
Rutherglen, horses Wed. before 1 Fridy; 

cows, 1 Fri. ; horses and cows Fri. aftei' 25 
St Andrews, cattle and hiring Mon. after 10 
Wigtown, horses Thursdy before Dumfries 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



THE SCOTTISH 

PLATE-GLASS INSURANCE CO. 

LIMITED. 

Head Office: 93 GEORGE STREET, EDINBURGH. 



Oldest Glass Insurance Company in Scotland. 



Special Features — Undoubted Security. Lowest 
Rates. Prompt Replacements. 



Agents at Dalkeith— 



W. MAIN, Royal Bank and J. GARMENT, Booksellep 



CI)e fflalfceitl) Mbk WBhvthomt. 



JOHN GARMENT, 67 High Street, Dalkeith. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



GEORGE LIDDELL, 

Painter, Glazier, and Paper-Hanger. 
64 High Street, DALKEITH. 

OILS, BRUSHES, and COLOURS. 

Glass Cut to Or^^er. Wiodows Cle.Tnecl and Glazed. 

PAPER-HANGINGS IN GRExiT VARIETY. 

Agent for The Guardian Plate-Glass Insurance Coy. 

D. & X CAMPBELL, 

Beg respectfully to thank the public generally for the liberal 
support bcFtowed upon them since Commencing Business^ & 
they still hope, by giving strict personal atteirtion to all 
Orders entrusted to their care, to merit a continuance of pub- 
lic support. 

Milk Delivered Three Times a Day. 

Estimates given fer all ki?ids of Carti?ig Work. 

Vans for Hire. 
Note Address — 

83 Back Street, DalkeitJi. 

J' 



1B6 High Street, Dalkeith. 

Slating in all its branches. Gurss put up. 

White-Washing done. Smoky Chimneys Cured. 

Grates Built in. 



ibVERtlSEMENf^ 



CI)e IBalfteitf) Bftle iSlareboirSf* 



JOHN GARMEMT, 87 High Street, Dalkeith. 









I 



<m 



5fl^ ^ 






p 



|) 



BUTCHER, POULTERER, 

93 HIGH STREET, 
DALKEITH. 

I COUNTRY ORDERS PUNCTUALLY ATTENDED TO. 

WILLIAM WATSON, 

Groeer and Provision Merchant, 

Eifr::' :: ^■^ PLACE, ©iLiEITH. 
All kinds of Grocery Goods supplied. 

Orders received by Post or otherwise, will be carefully 
attended to, and will be delivered in Town cr Country, free of 

Cija,! oc. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



JAMES SIMPSON, 

SLATER AND CHIMNEY SWEEPER. 

YOUNG'S GLOSE, DALKEITH. | 

GRATES BUILT. CHIMNEY CANS Put up. 
White-Wasliing and every sort of Jobbing done to order. * 



%t^A^' "^^/jC 



eJje^^j/Cs a^^'Jc'llW 









FAMILY GROCER, 

lea. Coffee ^ Spice Jflerchant, 

ALEXANDER GOUGH, 

BREAD AND BISCUIT BAKER, 



-^-oO< 



Bread of the Finest Quality. 

Soirees and Paeties Purveyed for. 



178 HIGH STREET, DALKEITH 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



JAMES AITKEN, 

20 SOUTH STREET, DALKEITH, 

I Has always 00 hand a Superior Assortmeut of BOOTS and 
SHOES Boots aad Shoes also made to order, the Quality, 
Material, and Worknmn^'hip of which are guaranteed. 

► PvEPATRS Neatly Executed. 

I Mr P T^'UmTr^AT 
1. ffi 11. MUUUIjAL^ 

BERLIN AMD FANCY WAREHOUSE, 
21 High Street, Dalkeith. 



Agents for Messrs A. & J. McNAB, Dyers and Cleaners to 

the Queen, Inglis Green, Slateforch 

And for the celebrated Earlston Ginghams. 

JOHN PENMAN, 

JOINER AND CARTWRIGHT, 
NEWMILLS5 DALKEITH 

JOBBING PROMPTLY & TASTEFULLY EXECUTED 

Bobbin and Cabinet Turning, &c. 

Estimates Furnished. 

THOMAS WATSON, 

Grocer, Dairyman and Coal Merchant, 

i ffiiTeHElL STBEETj MiiifTO, 



Coals Delivered to Order. Cart and Van for Hire. 



AbVERTISEMENTS 



THOMAS WALLACE, 
PortFait and Landscape Photographer, 

and Picture Frame Maker, 
ESKBANK ROAD, DALKEITH. 



All kinds of Pictures Copied or Enlarged to any size. 
X Picnic parties and Clab groups taken by arrangement, x 



A large stock of the Newest Mouldings always 
on hand. 



Peices on Application. 



WILLIAM THOMSON, 

NATIONAL REGISTERED j 

plumber, ®ot asaater, ®u & ^amtarp engineer, 

Bueeleueh Street, Dalkeith. 

< 

liouse iJrains, Soil and Wast^ fipjes tested 
with imptau-ed Imolie 14lar:^lun^» 

Baths, Wash-Hand Basins, Sinks and Tubs, Bramah and 
Wash-Down Waterclosets, Hot and Cold Water Tanks. 
Safety Valves for Kitchen Boiler.'^. 

WELStUCH INCANDESCENT GAS BURNERS, 

with all the Latest Improvements. 
Lamp complete, with Mantle, 4s. 

All kinds of Gasfittings put up or Repaired. 
Material and Workmanship of first quality. 

Estimates Fubnished. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



WILLIAM THORBUM, 

Plumber, Gasfitter, and Sanitary Engineer. 

97 High Street, Dalkeith. 



Dwelling-houses in Town or Country 
fitted up in a Superior Style. 

Repairs and Alterations promptly and carefully executed. 

REGISTERED PLUMBERS ONLY EMPLOYED. 



97 Slia SflllT, WAIMMTSm, 

House — Bridgend. 

W. S. MIDDLEMA88, 

Tailor and Clothier, 

%1 HigH STREET, ©ALKEITH 

(Above Mr Garment Stationer), 
Takes this opportunity of thanking Customers for 
the support accorded him in the past, and hopes by 
strict attention to business to receive a continuance 
of same. 

W.S.M. has always on hand a large and varied 
Selection of Overcoatings, Suitings, and Trouser- 
ings in all the newest shades and designs, at lowest 
possible prices. 

Large selection of Hats, Caps, Braces, Collars, 
Scarfs, Shirts, &c. 

Underclothing at all Prices. 

Special attention given to Ladies' Jackets, &c. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



R, & A. HISLOP, 

(Successors to Mr James Hare,) 

Postmasters and Coach Hirers, 

Justinlees Inn Stables, ESKBANK. 

Close and Open Carriages, Brakes, Dogcarts, etc, for Hire. 
Young Horses Trained to Saddle and Harness. 



BUTCHER, -^ '" ^^-■■-^. POyiTERER, 

i 

and GAME ^^ ,., DEALER. 

Bucclencli Plac_ '"" ,.:3i:dt'i. 

(Opposite Railway Station.) 

Corned Beef , Bounds, Finest Sa^i^sages, &c. 



REGULAR SUPPLY OF RABBITS AND GAME OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION IN THEIR SEASON. 

WM. FALCONER k SON, 
mw - Iplate Workers mil ®a0fitter0, 

Buccleueh Street, Dalkeith. 



UMBRELLAS COVERED & REPAIRED on the Premise?. 
All Kinds of Jobbing Punctual ly Attended to. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



THOMAS S. CHALMERS, 

House Painter, Paper-Hanger, 

Decorator and Glazier. 

TAITSTREET&160HIGH STREET 

DALKEITH. 



BRUSHES, OILS and COLOURS. 

Windows Cleaned and Giazed. 

Latest Designs in Wall Papers, 

Glass Cut to Order, 



ESTIMATES FURNISHED. 



The Popular Drapery ¥/arehouse. 



GENERAL DRAPERS, 

Hosiers, Miiliiiers, Dressmakers, Outfiitters, 

2, 4 & 8 SOUTH STREET, 

D A L K E IT H. 

First- Class Goods and Moderate Prices. 

Experienced Dressmakers. 

Mourning Orders punctually attended to. 

Sign of the Lamb. Established 50 Years. 






-% mr^f 









REL'EVE __ 

XVERiSH HEAtTVIi ii^T^ 
PrevenV- I A f / i'> 
Fih Convulsion?!, \\^^ \j 



PledseObseripfhe EX,S. i'l 



^"OFFSPHAY" 



AV 7.ytered 1 rade Mark No. 213,273. 
■".'-.:. pray " is a concentrated Fruit 
v.] M.ii extracted from the purest and 
rijitatliui s. Inits preparation the gri a!.e.M 
ctire is taken, and by the latest iiTiimn'ea 
iiicthod tliat science and skill can produce, 
the Crystals retain their full and tresh 
natural flavours. 

In 1 nis pi ice ^^2' , per J OS , ud. 
lull Direct en eiestiinp-don each Tin for 
n ^km, 2/ " C 3 oTre reshmg beverage. 

Lo._ ^eietLe, £z G r.ger 

I'V". ^ J. oo'jtile, bd., ixom 

i.>csc, i/d i.j.o^i i/^sboietfopi etors— 

... n:)WA & NE5D514M, y(^ 

^^^//>- BEDFORD. /^^ 




BEST y 
ERTAir^l CURE FOP 



\j 



^■^z^ 



'JRELY 



AFTEll ^fXTY YEIIZS STILT. --. 

l/iTIielp ton's Healing' Cisitment. 

The Lest r-medy 'or Bums., Scalds, 'Olcors. ana all 

B'sreasap. I'illb or Oi im-nt, Vidt), is. lid., aud 2s. ©sic, of aU 

. Clieii:i.sts. Fiee Liy Post iu ilie United ^n ing;dom for 8, 14, or 33 Stamps.. 

I_ZJ Pl^OPRiETORS— 

EU I cut 16.5 a WHELPTO^ OL ^dli 3, CraneCoupt Fleet St., London. E.O. 



[:.o,:] 



POST-OFFICE INFOEMATION. 



LETTER POST. 

*r() and from all parts of the 
'United Kingdom the prepaid 
rates are :— 
Not exceeding 4 oz. in weight Id. 

For every additional 2 oz ^d. 

A letter posted unpaid will be 
charged on delivery with douhlo 
postage, and a letter posted In- 
sufficiently pre-paid will be 
charged with double the defl^ 
ciency. — No letter may exceed 
two feet in length, one foot in 
width, or one foot in depth, un- 
less it be sent to or from a 
Government office. 

The charge for the re-direction 
of letters lias been abolished. 

The Foreign and Colonial Post- 
age rate is I'.^d. per h oz. 

IMPERIAL PENNY POSTAGE. 

As soon as the necessary arrange- 
ments can be made, a letter postage 
of Id. per \ oz. is to be established 
between the United Kingdom, Can- 
ada, Newfoundland, Cape Colony, 
Natal, etc. 

POSTAGE ON INLAND REGISTERED 
NEWSPAPERS. 

Prepaid Bates.— For each Regis- 
tered Newspaper, whether posted 
singly or in a packet— One Half- 
penny ; but a packet containing 
two or more Registered News- 
papers is not chargeable with a 
higher rate of postage than would 
be cf.argeable on a Book-Packet 
or letter of the same weight. 

No Newspaper, whether posted 
singly or in a packet, may contain 
any enclosure except the supple- 
ment or supplements belonging 
to it. 

REGISTRATION AND COM- 
PENSATION. 

By the prepayment of a fee of 
twopence any postal packet (par- 
cels included) may l)e registered to 
any place in the United Kingdom. 
Every packet to be registered 
must be given to an agent of 
the Post-Office and a receipt 
obtained for it. The Postmaster- 
General will give compensation 
up to a maximum limiD of £120 
for the loss and damage of Inland 
Postal Packets of all kinds. The 
ordinary registration fee of '/d. 
secures £5; 3d.,£10; 4d.,£20 ; 5d., 
£30 ; 6d., £40 ; Id., £50 ; 8a'., £60 ; 
9d.,£70; 10ti.,£80; lid., £90; Is., 
£100; is. Id., £110; is. 2d., £120. 

REGISTERED LETTER ENVELOPES 

are sold at all Post-Offices, and 
by Rural Messengers, according 
to size, from 2id. to 3d. each. 

FOREIGN AND COLONIAL PATTERNS 
AND SAMPLES. 

This post is absolutely re- 
stricted to bond fide trade Patterns 
and Samples. The rate of post- 
age is id. per 2 oz., except that the 
lowest charge is Id., for which sum, 
however, a weight of 4 oz. may be 
sent. 

POST CARDS. 

Post Cards for use in the United 
Kingdom only are sold at 10 for 



554d., or of finer quality 10 for 6d. 
They canbcliad in smaller num- 
bers or singly. Foreign Poat 
Cards, id. ; Reply, 2d. 

Stout Reply Post Cards are sold 
at l%d. each, or ten for is. Thin 
Reply Post Cards are charged IJd: 
each, or ten for lid. 

Letter Cards are sold at 8 for 
9d. ; smaller numbers in propor- 
tion. 

INLAND PARCEL POST. 

For an Inland Postal Parcel the 
rate of postage, to be prepaid in 
ordinary postage stamps, is— 

s.d. 
Not exceeding in weight lib, C 3 
li3xcdg.llb.&notexcdg.2lb3. 4 
„ 2 lbs. „ ,, Slbs. 5 
„ 3 lbs. „ „ 4 lbs. 6 
„ 4 lbs. „ „ 5 lbs. 7 
„ 5 lbs. „ „ 6 lbs. 8 
„ 6 lbs. „ „ 711)8. 9 
„ 7 lbs. „ „ albs. (• 10 
„ 8 1b?. „ „ 9 lbs. Oil 
„ 9 lbs. „ „ 11 lbs. 1 
Maximum length allowed for a 
postal parcel is 3 feet 6 inches ; 
maximum length and girth com- 
bined, 6 feet. Examples :— A par- 
cel measuring 3 feet 6 inches in 
its longest dimension may mea- 
sure as much as 2 feet 6 inches in 
girth, i.e. around its thickest 
part ; or— a shorter parcel may be 
thicker, e.g. if measuring no more 
than 3 feet in length, it may mea- 
sure as much as 3 feet in girth, 
i.e. around its thickest part. 

The Regulations under which 
certain Articles are prohiljited 
from transmission by the Letter 
Post — with a few exceptions 
—apply equally to the Parcel 
Post. For instance— Gunpowder, 
Lucifer Matches, anything liable 
to sudden combustion, bladders 
containing liquid, and Live Ani- 
mals, except bees, are excluded 
from the Parcel Post. 

Certificates of posting of par- 
cels can be obtained gratis. 

FOREIGN PARCEL POST. 

A Parcel Post service has he^m 
established between tne Unitedi 
Kingdom and niany Foreigmi 
countries and the British ColoMes 
and Foreign Possessions geme'ir^ 
ally. For rates and other c-oiia- 
ditions, see the Post Offlc* Guide, 
published quarterly. 

INLAND BOOK POST. 

The Book-Post is now limited 
to packets not exceeding 2 oz. in 
weight. For this weight the 
charge is Jd. 

If a Book-Packet is posted 
unpaid, double postage is charged 
on delivery. 

Every Book-Packet must be 
posted either without a cover or 
in an unfastened envelope, or in 
a cover which can be easily 
removed for the purposes of 
examination. 

No Book-Packet may exceed 2 
feet in length or l foot in breadth 
or depth. 

Beyond the iceight of 2 oz. there 
is now no distinction between let- 
ters, samples, and books. All go 
at the rate of Id. for not exceeding 4 
oz., and Id.for every additional 2 oz. 



I MONEV ORDERS. 

Money Orders are granted in the 
United Kingdom as follows :— 

Fovsumsnot exceeding £1, 2(Z.; 

above £1 and not excding. £3, 3d. 

„ £3 ,i „ £10, 4d. 

Money may be sent by Tele- 
graph Money Order at the follow- 
ing rates :— 

For sums not exceeding £3, 4d. ; 
above £3 and not excedg. £10, Gd. 

In addition to the commission 
a charge is made at the ordinary 
inland rate for the official tele- 
gram of advice and its repetition, 
the minimum being 9d. 

POSTAL ORDERS. 

Postal Orders are now issued at 
all Money Order Offices in the 
United Kingdom at the following 
lixed sums:— 

Is. «nd Is. 6d.,Jd.; 2s., 2s. 6d., 33., 
3s, 6d., 4s., As. 6d., 5s., 7s. 6d., lOS., 
and lOs. 6d., id. ; I5s. and 20s., \\d. 

MONEY ORDERS PAYABLE ABROAD. 

Foreign Orders are issued at 
tJse following rates :— 

If payable in Belgium, Den- 

miark, Danish West Indies, Dutch 

Kast India Possessions, Egypt, 

B'rancc, German Empire, Holland, 

Iceland, Italy, Japan, Norway, 

j; 'Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, 

i the United States, &c., or the 

British Possessions and Colonies: 

On sums not exceeding 

■ £2 OS. 6d. |£10 Is. 6d. 

£6 is. Od. I 

POSTAL TELEGRAMS. 

The charge for telegrams 
fdlffi-oughout the United Kingdom 
is .6d. for the first 12 words, and 
S&for eA^ery additional word. Ad- 
<linesses are charged for. A receipt 
for the charges: can be obtained 
at a cost of 2d. 

POST-OFFICE SAVINGS BANKS. 

Deposits of one shilling upwards 
will be received from any deposi- 
tor at the Post-Offlce Savings 
Banks, provided the deposits 
made by such depositor in any 
year ending the Slst Decemher do 
not exceed £50, and provided the 
total amount does not exceed £200 
inclusive of interest. Separate 
accounts may be opened in the 
names of wife and children. 

"TAKE CARE OF THE PENCE." 

At every Post-Offlce in the Uni- 
ted Kingdom forms can be ob- 
tained, free of charge, on which 
twelve penny postage stamps can 
be fixed ; and when the form has 
been thus filled up with twelve 
penny stamps, it will be received 
at any Post-Offlce Savings Bank 
as a savings bank deposit for Is. 

STOCKS CAN BE BOUGHT 

at any Post-Offlce Savings Bank. 
Any depositor who wishes can in- 
vest in Government Stock at the 
current price of the day. The 
amount of stock which can be 
purchased or sold at one time is 
now reduced to the nominal sum 
of Is. A small sum is charged by 
way of commission on invest- 
ment and sale. 



"be GINNING AND ENDING SHAKE HANDS. 



INTERESTING GLEANINGS AND GATHERINGS. 



The first folio edition of Spen- 
ser's "Faerie Queen," 1609, was 
published at one guinea. 

A German critic has claimed 
Goethe as the greatest of poets, 
because Germany, Iteing the 
greatest military power, wanted 
a poet to match. 

No one could paint a cat like 
Gottfried Mind, who died at Bern 
in 1S14. He actually had eight 
hundred live ones, but these were 
ordered to be killed after his 
death, as some were believed to 
be irad. 

A GENERATION in Chronology 
is the interval of time between 
tbe liirth of a father and the birth 
of his child : 33 years are allowed 
for the average length of 
a generation. 

Mr, Ruskin says, and 
with cinsidcrnble truth, _, 

that our appreciation of 
beautiful colour ought to 
give us pleasure analogous 
to that derived from eat- 
ing sweet food. 



ADVICE. 

I give thee three precepts to 
carry throuyk life : 

" Hear, see, and say no- 
thing," if thou kast a 
u i/e. 



There is an old Northumbrian 
rhyme which, homely as it is, is 
well worth the attention of those 
who in the lottery of matrimony 
have their prizes yet to draw :— 
" A man may spend 
And yet may fend. 
If his wife be oiut, if his wife be 
owt ; 
A man may care 
And yet be bare. 
If his loife be nowt, if Ms wife 
be nowt." 



When exposed to the influence 
of Che sun, aluminium will store 
up heat to a remarkable degree, 
eventually becoming so hot as to 
blister the skin. 



The following carious ijiscripiion appears in 
the churchyard, Peusey, Dorsetshirt:~ 



for 



Our House of Commons, 
anciently a chapel, was 
founded by King, 'Stephen ; 
from whence it obtained 
the name of St. Stephen's t 
Chapel, though dedicated 
to the blessed Virgin Mary 
King Stephen was no saint. 

The first edition of Robert 
Burns's collected "Poems" was 
published at Kilmarnock in 178fi, 
and was sold in a month. The 
luice of each copy was three shil- 
lings, and the poet cleared twenty 
guineas. 

"A Life on the Ocean Wave" 
was the work of Epes Sargent, an 
Ainen.an poet, the idea being 
suggested to him during a walk 
on the Battery, ia New York, one 
day when a high wind was blow- 
ing in from the sea. It was set to 
music by Henry Russell. 

It is probable that new modi- 
fications of our present diatonic 
scale may in time come into use. 
The scale known as the "major- 
minor," i.e. our usual major scale, 
with the 6th flattened, has already 
been adopted by modern com- 
posers—Chopin, for example. 

A Roman citizen who had long 
been in a state of great poverty, 
died at a very advanced age. The 
Emperor Augustus, hearing of it, 
said to his attendants— 'Purchase 
his mattress for me, for there 
must be some great virtue in it 
since he could sleep on it whilst 
IB 8uch poverty," 



HERE LIES THE BODY 

OP 

LADY O'LOONET, 

GREAT NIECE OP BURKE, 

COMMONLy CALLED THE SUBLIMB 

SHE -WAS 

BLAND, PASSIONATE, AND DEEPl.Y RELIGIOUS ; 

ALSO, SHE PAINTED 

IN ■WATER-COLO !1RS, 

AND SENT SI'.VKRAL PICTURES 

TO THE EXHIBITION. 

SUE ■WAS FIRST COUSIN 

TO LADY JONES ; 

AND OP SUCH 

IS THE KINGDOM OP HBAVBN. 



A HAPPY description of Wag- 
ner's music from the adversary's 
point of view was supplied by the 
man who said of it:— "It is all 
noise, but it is beautiful noise." 

The tavern sign of the "Cat 
and Fiddle" (familiar ^from the 
nursery rhyme) was originally 
Gnton ri/c/e— in memory otCatO'i, 
the faithful governor of Calais. 

A BISHOP of Noyon was a good 
and virtuous prelite, but so vain, 
that on his death a rough draft 
of his own funeral oration was 
found in his hand. 

It was recently alleged in an 
affidavit made by a doctor in lu- 
nacy, that for a well-to-do bache- 
lor to go into the Strand, and in 
the course of the same 
morning spend £5 in the 
purchase of 'old books," 
was a ground for belief in 
his insanity and for lock- 
ing him up. 

Bronze is a mixture of 
copper 95 parts, tin 4 parts, 
and zinc l part. 



A SENSIBLE EHYME. 



Be always as merry as ever 

you can, 
For no one delights in a 

sorrowful man. 



"The Deserted Village" ap- 
peared in 1770 at the modest price 
of two shtllings. 

Cardinal Impebiali said :— 
"There is no man whom Fortune 
has not visited once in his life; 
but where she visits a man and 
does not find him ready to receive 
her, she enters by the dooi and 
goes out by the window." 



ON A GOOD WOMAN. 

The epitaphs of Pope are gener- 
ally considered to possess great 

literary merit. The following is 

one of them : — 

Here lies a woman, good without 
pretence, 

Blest loith plain reason and with 
sober sense; 

No conquests she, but o'er herself, 
desired. 

No arts essayed, but not to be ad- 
mired. 

Passion and pride were to her soul 
unknown. 

Convinced thatvlrtueonlpishero7rn. 

So unaffecUd, so cvni/joi'ed a mind ; 

So firm, yet soft; so strong, yet so 
refined ; 

Heaven, as its purest gold, by tor- 
tures tried ; 

The saint sustained it, but the 
woman died. 



BoswELL told Johnson 
that such a thing as a beg- 
gar starving to death in 
the streets of a Scotch 
city was unheard of. Jolm- 
son replied : •' This does not 
arise from the want of beggars, 
but the impossibility of starving 
a Scotchman." 

"Nobody," says Dr. Johnson, 
"ever laid down the book of 
'Robinson Crusoe' without wish- 
ing it longer." « 

Abecedarians were followers 
of Stork, an Anabaptist in the 
sixteenth century, and they de- 
rived their name from their re- 
jection of all worldly knowledge, 
even of the alphaljet. 

Has the purring of a cat 
ever been more prettily or more 
quaintly described than by a little 
four-year-old, who one day said 
of a pet cat who was giving vent 
to his feline satisfactioUj "uh, 
listen ! he's got a bee in his 
heart 1" 

" I NEVER in my life so touched 
the congregation," Dean Stanley 
told his wife after a sermon in 
Westminster Abbey. "They were 
entranced ; every eye was upon 
me from the first word to the 
last." "No wonder," said Lady 
Augusta, "your gloves were in- 
side your hat. and when you took 
it off, ther remained on the top of 
your head all tUroughihesermon." 
The Dean was remarkable tor a 
Bcanty use of action in preaching. 



*A WOEK ILL DONE MUST BE DONE TWICE. 



The sign of the Bull and Mouth 
is a comu'tion (if Boulogne Moutli, 
or Boulogne Harbour, referring 
to tlie naval victory there. 

No person is allowed to coin any- 
token to pass for, or as represent- 
ing, bronze or other money under 
a penalty of £20. 

Napoleon's handwriting was 
so illegible that his letters from 
(iermany to Josephine were at 
first taken for rough maps of the 
seat of war. 

The game of golf is said to have 
been invented in ancient times by 
a lonely shepherd, who had no- 
thing better to do than to knock 
round stones into a rabbi c-hole 
with his crook. 

OtL has long been used to calm 
stormy s^as ; but it has been re- 
cently discovered that soap ^ 
dissolved in water— soapsuds, ^ 
in fact— has the same effect, and 
is not a auarter so expensive. 

Daniel Webster was aptly 
described by Sydney Smith as 
a " steam engine in trousers." 



INSPIRATION. 
A POETICAL shoemaker in 
Barnstaple, some years back, 
hung up Che following remark- 
able effusion on a board over 
his shop :— 

"Blow, oh blow, ye heavenly 
breezes. 
Underneath these leafy treeses ; 
Sing, oh sing, ye heavenly 

muses. 
While I mend my boots and 



One of the peculiarities of 
the cocoa-nut palm is that it 
never stands upright. A Ma- 
layan saying has it that—" He 
who has looked upon a dead 
monkey ; he who has found the 
nest of the paddy-bird; he who 
hath beheld a straight cocoa-nut, 
or hns fathomed tlie deceitful 
heartof woman,wiU live for ever." 

Of 100,0C0 English words, G0,000 
are of Teutonic origin; 30,000 Greek 
and Latin ; and 10,000 from other 
sources. 

It was a German orator who, 
warming with his subject, ex- 
claimed, "There is no man, wo- 
man, or child in the house who 
has arrived at the age of fifty 
years, but what has feic the truth 
thundering through their minds 
for centuries." 

For a century and a half Chel- 
sea was famous for its special 
buns, as much as £i!oO havjcg been 
taken on one Good Friday morn- 
ing at the Chelsea Bun House. On 
Good Friday morning, 1839, nearly 
a quarter of a million buns were 
made and sold at this noted house. 

A STORY is told of a scion of the 
great house of Urquhart, of Cro- 
maity, who was necessitated by 
his extravagance to slU his in- 
heritance, and who, sinking step 
by step to the lowest depths of 
wretchedness, came at last a wan- 
dering beggar to the door which 
had once been his own. 



A MAID OF HONOUR. 

AN epitaph in St. Saviour's 
Church, Southwark, on a girl ten 
years of age, contains this quaint 
thought :— 



Such grace the King of . 

bestowed upon her 
That now she lives with Him 

a maid of honour. 



Herb are the values of some 
old moneys .-—Guinea, 2ls. ; Caro- 
lus, 23s. ; Moidore, 27s. ; 
10s. ; Noble, 6s, ; Testa, 6d. 

In order to be intimate with 
George Eliot for any length of 
time, it was necessary to worship 
her, or to make as though you did 
when you did not. 



A SONNET ON A SONNET. 

Well, if it must be so, it must ; and I, 

Albeit unskilful in the tuneful art. 
Will make a sonnet ; or at least I'll try 
To make a sonnet, and •perform my 
part. 
But in a sonnet everybody knows 
There must be always fourteen lines ; 
my heart 
Sinks at the thought ; but, courage, here 
it goes. 
There are seven lines already : could 

I get 
Seven more the task would be per- 
formed; and yet 
It will be like a horse behind a cart, 
For somehow rhyme has got a wondrous 
start 
Of reason, and ichile puzzling on I've 

The subject slip. What shall it be ? But, 

stay. 
Here comes the fourteenth line. 'Tis 

done I Huzza I 

William Fitzgeeald. 



A Gascon preacher stopped 
short in the pulpit ; it was in vain 
that lie scratched his head; no- 
thing would come out. " My 
friends," said he, as he walked 
quietly down the pulpit stairs, 
"my friends, I pity you, for you 
have lost a flue discourse." 

It is as well not to believe 
every tale told us at show places. 
Interesting neighiiourhoods are 
often not all they profess to be ; 
and as for relics, many of them 
are of the same class as the 
sheep bones shown to a party of 
siglitseers, as veneralile curiosi- 
ties, l)y an old woman who, when 
remonstrated with, said, "They 
are good enough for the gentle- 
men." 



MOTTOES FOR WEDDING 

RINGS. 
" Thou and I for ever." 
" All thine and thine for ever." 
" With this the giver for eternity." 
" My love like a golden circle shall 

surround thee." 
One of the prettiest sentiments for 

a rintj is taken from " Cymbeline " 

— " Remain thou here while sense 

can keep you on" 



There was an old belief that 
unless a maiden was kissed under 
the mistletoe at Christinas she 
would not be married during the 
ensuing year. 

Sir Thomas Lawrence, the 
most celebrated portrait painter 
of his age, was born at Bristol in 
176a, and was the son of an inn- 
keeper in poor circumstances. 

A bishop one day said to the 
Abl)e de Bernis, who lived a 
very worldly kind of life, "As 
long as I live, you shall have 
no preferment! " "I can wait," 
replied the abb^. 

When the sun shines on the 
falling rain, every Scotch child 
knows that " the fairies are bak- 
ing " ; but a succession of such 
showers once raised a serious 
^ problem in the ve.^ed question 
of supply and demand. "What 
c;in they be doing with all the 
Ijread ? " "1 doot they'll lie 
goin" to give a party the 
nicht," was the ingenious so- 
lution. 



THE POET. 

On the monument to Edward 
Capern, the postman-poet, of ten 
called the Devonshire Burns, 
are the following lines by the 
Poet Laureate :— 
" lark-like Poet ! carol on, 
Lost in dim light, an unseen 
trill ! 
We, in the Heaven where you 
are gone, 
Find you no more, but hear 
you still." 



In Finland, according to 
Bayard Taylor, the women re- 
sent as an insult a salute upon 
the lips. A Finnish matron, 
hearing of our English custom 
^ of kissing, declared that did 
her husband attempt such a 
liberty, she would treat him 
with such a box on the ears 
that he should not readily forget. 

"The Last Rose of Summer" 
was the work of Thomas Moore. 
The melody is a very ancient 
Irish tune, formerly known as 
tiie "Groves of Blarney." This 
tune has been found in collections 
of Irish music at least 200 years 
old. 

The Man Laden with Mischief 
is a queer sign, but it does not 
refer to a toper who has taken too 
much liquor on board, as some 
have supposed, but is in allusion 
to Hogarth's famous picture of a 
man carrying a woman on his 
back. Sometimes a rough copy 
of the picture appears along with 
the sign. 

The Code of Justinian says 
" that if a man l.ietrothed a woman 
by a kiss and either party died 
before marriage, the heirs were 
entitled to balf the donations of 
the survivor to the other party ; 
but if the contract was made 
witlTOut the solemn kiss, the 
whole of 'the espousal must be 
restored to the donors and their 
heirs-at-law.'" 



1st Month," 



JANUARY— 31 days. 



PLEASANT HOUES 
FLY FAST. 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



JLast Quarter 5th, 

Ne\T Moon lltli, 

First Quarter ISth, 

Full Moon 2t5tl], 



22 min. past 3 morning. 
50 rain, past 10 afternoon. 
36 min. past 4 afternoon. 
34 min. past 7 afternoon. 




WORDS OF THE WISE. 



Adversity is the trial of 
in-iiu-iple. Without it a man 
hardly knows whether he is 
honest or not. 

Truk wealth does not consist 
in the possession of ^old and 
silver, but In the judicious use 
made of them. 



It isn't so much what a man 
has that makes liimliappy, asit 
Is what he doesn't want. 

People who will carry a 
heavy load without complaint 
for a short rime will soon weary 
of a lighter burden that is al- 
ways with i hem. 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 



Tie ivlio gains time gains every- 
thing. 

10.— Postal rates before the in- 
troduction of penny postage were 
regulated by the distance a letter 
travelled from the post-offlce at 
which It was posted, by the number 
of sheets of paper used for the pur- 
poses of the letter, and by weight, 
the latter consideration entering 
but slightly into the question. 

The great roads were all carefully 
surveyed by officers of the Post 
Office— the title of surveyor has 
come down to the present day, 
though the officer now surveys 
post-offices, not roads— and tables 
of distances were kept for the cal- 
culation of rates. 

Over and above the normal dis- 
tance-raies, there were exceptional 
charges, such as packet-rates, a 
penny for crossing the Menai- 
bridge and a halfpenny for con- 
veyance In Scotland on a mail 
carriage of more tlian two wheels. 
Indeed, one wonders lv>\v letters 
ever reached their destination at 
all, the time and labour involved 
m justly charging them with post- 
age must, one would think, luive 
been so great. 

The public, however, were con- 
cerned with tlie practical results 
of I he system, and a few examples 
\\ill show what these were. The 
lowest rate for a letter sent from 
London to Birmingham was 9d. ; 
if it containe I a second sheet of 
paper, or, as it was called in days 
when one sheet served for both 
letter and envelope, an enclosure, 
the charge was immediately 
doubled. 

From London to Edinburgh the 
lowest rate was is. lid., smd from 
London co Dublin, where two toll- 
bridges and the sea had to be 
crossed. Is. 4d. 

It may well be imagined that 
with such charges no one hesitated 
to send his letters by other 
agencies than the Post Office, or 
that, in spite of stringent penal- 
ties, infringements of the State 
monopoly were innumerable. 

21.— "When Quin was manager of 
one of the London theatres a person 
applied to him to be admitted on 
the stage. As a specimen of his 
dramatic power.^, he began the 
soliloquy of Hamlet— 

" To be or vot to be, that is the 
question?" 

Quin, indignant at the man's 
absurd presumption, exclaimed, 
very decisively: "No question, 
sir, upon my houour !— not 1 1 be, 
most certainly." 

24.— Frederick the Gieat once 
Sf'.t to Dresden for Dr. Baylies, an 
English physician, to introduce 
inoculation into his dominions. 

u hen I he doctor arrived in 
Berlin, the kmg did not omit to 
ask his favourite question : " Well, 
doctor, how many have you des- 
patched to the oth r world ?" 

Baylies, who was equally warm 
and witty, replied, "Not so many 
as you, sire." 



'wish and good is better than rich and great." 



Frederick, who liked l:)etter to 
Joke than to be joked with, turned 
his back upon him, and never saw 
him from that moment. 

26.— Of the eccentricities of Lady 
Caroline Lamb many tales are told. 
On one occasion she was returning 
a visit at Danesbury, and, having no 
one to keep her company, she chose 
to sit outside with the coachman 
instead of taking her usual place 
inside the carriage. On arriving at 
the door of the mansion, the foot- 
man waited to hand her down, when, 
to his horror, she said, " I am going 
to jump off, and you mast catch 
me;" and, before he could say a 
word, the deed was done. She paid 
ber visit decorously, but, of course, 
there was much talk in the servants 
hall. 

At another time, Lady Caroline 
happened to come into the room 
just before a great dinner party 
when the servants were laying the 
table. She found fault with the 
decorations, they were too level and 
too low ; there ought to be some- 
thing picturesque or elevated, a 
group of figures or a tier of flowers. 
The butler listened, but went on 
spreading out the contents of his 
plate chest. 

Lady Caroline, however, would 
not have her ideas set at nought. 
She ordered the centre piece away, 
and, without disturbing thearrange- 
ments of the table, she lightly 
stepped into the vacant place, and 
stood in a graceful attitude to illus- 
trate her meaning. 

The butler flew for his master, 
who, when he came in, cried in his 
gentlest tone, " Caroline, Caroline ! " 
and, taking her in his arms, carried 
her out into the sunshine, talking 
all the time of ordinary matters, so 
as to draw off her attention. That 
evening she received her friends 
with her usual grace of manner. 

27.— An amusing anecdote told 
about the present German Emperor 
is the following. During his stay 
at Kiel, in 1896, the Emperor wished 
to pay a visit to the aunt of the 
Empress, Frau Prof, von Esmarch, 
wife of the famous surgeon, who 
is by birth Princess Henrietta of 
Schleswig-Holstein. 

The monarch desired to call un- 
ceremoniously and unite eii faviille, 
and hence had not announced his 
coming. He rang the bell at the 
small house, and a raw servant girl, 
who had never seen him before, 
opened and demanded to know what 
he wanted. 

The Emperor said, "Announce 
me, please. I am the Emperor," 
whereupon the girl, thinking she 
had a madman to deal with, shrieked 
with fright and slammed the door 
in his face. 

When, five minutes later, the aunt 
of the Empress in person opened 
the door, the Emperor was still 
standing patiently on the threshold, 
grinning with the fun of the situa- 
tion, and anxious to be admitted. 



" What is life ? 'Tis not to stalk, and 

draw fresh air. 
From time to time; or gaze upon the 

sun : 
'Tis to be free: ivhen liberty is gone. 
Life grows insipid, and has lost its 

relish."— Avvisoy. 



A GREAT PUBLIC PERFORMER. 



THE name of no public performer is better known than 
that of Mr. Bloudin who died on the 22nd of February, 
1897. He had filled, throughout nearly the whole of 
his prolonged career, a role as public entertainer which 
secured for him the reputation of being the most accom- 
plished performer on record in his particular profession. 

Blondin— or, to give him his real name, Jean Frangois Grave- 
let— was born in 1824 at St. Omer, Pas de Calais, France, and 
began his training at the early age of five years, when, struck 
by the performances of a travelling company of acrobats 
near his parents' house, he began to imitate them on his own 
account. An old sailor, whose sympathies he enlisted, 
provided him with a rope and an old spar as a balancing pole, 
and with these the child speedily acquired a dexterity which 
astonished his parents, who, seeing in him the making of a 
good acrobat, eventually sent him to the Ecole de Gyranase 
at Lyons. 

There his progress was so rapid that six months afterwards 
he was able to make his first public appearance as " The 
Little Wonder," and his fame quickly spread through France. 
Left an orphan at the age of nine, he determined to follow 
up with what was an indomitable perseverance the prospects 
that seemed to open out to him, and, thanks to this perse- 
verance and to natural aptitude, he speedily secured for him- 
self a position in which he was without a rival. 

In 1851 he joined the Ravel troupe of acrobats in a pro- 
longed tour through the United States, and achieved an 
enormous success there. But he aspired to do something 
more striking than had ever been done before, and in 1859 he 
announced his intention of walking across the Falls of Niagara 
on a rope. He was regarded as insane, but when, on June 
30 in that year, he had a rope, 1,100ft. long stretched across 
the rapids below the falls at an elevation of 160ft. there was 
a crowd of some 25,000 persons assembled to see him cross, 
which he did in the course of five minutes, and to watch him 
afterwards go through a variety of tricks, while they them- 
selves held their breath with feelings of suspense and horror. 

The name of Blondin has become a household word since 
then, but in those days his crossing of Niagara was a sensa- 
tion indeed. His performances there were continued up to 
the following September, but were varied by the constant 
introduction of new feats. Tims on one occasion he crossed 
the falls blindfold, on another in a heavy sack, and on 
another trundling a wheelbarrow. There was fresh excite- 
ment when he carried a man on his back the whole length of 
the rope, and it was either on this or on some subsequent 
occasion that Blondin found it necessary to remark to the 
man he carried, when they were midway across, " If you 
don't sit quiet I shall have to put you down." He also 
appeared in the character of a Siberian slave heavily burdened 
with shackles from head to foot, and on September 2 he con- 
cluded his public appearances for that year by standing on 
his head midway across the rope, surrounded by fireworks. 

In 1860 the performances were renewed, and in September 
Blondin crossed Niagara in the presence of the Prince of 
Wales, introducing still another new feature by using a pair of 
stilts. His invitation to the Prince to allow himself to be 
carried across was declined. At some of his other appear- 
ances in the States Blondin walked along a rope a quarter of 
a mile in length with his feet in baskets of wicker-work. 

In June, 1861, he made his first appearance at the Crystal 
Palace, receiving, it is said, £1,200 for twelve performances, 
a fresh contract being afterwards entered into for a longer 
period. On this occasion he turned somersaults, in stilts, 
on a rope stretched from end to end of the centre transept, 
170ft. from the ground, climbed over the back of a chair, 
cooked an omelette on a stove, and did a variety of other, 
at that time, astounding things, which suggested that, with 



2nd Month,! 
1899. J 



FEBRUARY— 28 days. 



tNO JOY 
WITHOUT ALLOY. 







THE MOON'S CHANGES 








Last Quarter 3rd, 24 min. past 5 afternoon. 

New Moon 10th, 32 min. past 9 morning. 

First Quarter 17th, 52 min. past 8 morning. 

Full Moon 25th, .... 16 min. past 2 afternoon. 


ENNEMI NE s'eNDORT AN ENEMY DOES 

NOT SLEEP. 


Sun 
Rises 
&Sets 


Moon 

Rises 
&Sets 


to 

<q 

21 


1 


w 


Partridge and Pheasant Shooting ends. 


7 42r 


ItiSfS 
A.M. 


2 


Th 


Candlemas. Scottish Quarter Day. 


4 49s 


Morn. 


22 


3 


F 


Marquis of Salisbury born, 1830. 


7 3Sr 


52 


C 


4 


S 
M 


W. H. Ainswortli, novelist, b. 1805. 


4 52s 
7 35r 
4 56s 


2 9 

3 23 

4 31 


24 

25 

26 


5 
6 


5. Thomas Carlyle died, 1881. 


7 


Tu 


Charles Dickens born, 1812. 


7 32r 


5 25 


27 


8 


W 


John Ruskin born, 1819. 


5 Os 


6 9 


28 


9 


Th 


8. Mary, Qn. of Scots, beheaded,1587. 


7 28r 


6 41 


29 


10 


F 


Queen Victoria married, 1840. 


5 3s 


Sets 
P.M. 


9 


11 


S 

M 


"Better poor than uicked." 


7 25r 

5 7s 
7 21r 


7 7 

8 32 

9 53 


1 
2 
3 


12 
13 


dluttiqua^eantta.— [fSy. 

14. St. Valentine's Day. 


14 


Tu 


Shrove Tuesday. 


5 11s 


11 13 


4 


15 
16 
17 


W 
Th 
F 


Ash Wednesday. 

15. Louis XV. of France, " le Bien 
Aime," born, 1710. 
Duchess of Albany born, 1861. 


717r 
5 14s 
713r 


Morn. 
29 
141 


5 
6 
D 


18 


S 


Charles Lamb, essayist, born, 1775, 


5 18s 

7 9r 
5 22s 


2 45 

3 40 

4 24 


8 

9 

10 


19 
20 


M 


(iua5ra0esima. ['^^'^S^™ 

Duchess of Fife born, 1867. 


21 


Tu 


Pope Julius II. died, 1513. 


7 5r 


4 59 


11 


22 


W 


George Washington born, 1732. 


5 25s 


5 26 


12 


23 


Th 


John Keats, poet, died, 1821. 


7 Ir 


5 49 


13 


24 

25 


F 

S 


" 2716 best physic is fresh air, 
The iest pill is plain fare." 


5 29s 
6o7r 

5 32s 

6 53r 
5 36s 


6 8 

Rises 
P.M. 

7 3 

8 14 

9 27 


14 
O 
16 
17 
18 


26 

27 
28 


M 
Tu 


Stttr ^utttra^ itt l^ettt. 

26. Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria 

born, 1861. 
Hare Hunting ends. 


WORDS OF THE WISE. 


T 
iind 
tbe 
of -s 


tan 
und 
tbo 

n 

dell 
tbo 
cm 
wil 
wit 


)reg 
atte 
higl 
voiiia 
LD ni 
36 w 
ersta 
=6 of 
^ tlio 
glH i 
11 m 
bat 

nev 
hme 


ilate bousebold affairs 

nd to her children is 

jest recommendation 

n. 

en view best at a dis- 

th tbe eyes of their 

nding as well as with 

nature. 

u continuest to take 

n idle argumentation, 

iy>t be qualified to 

A'itli tbe sophists, but 

er know how to live 

a. 


Deference 
plicate, the n 
tbe most eleg 
meuts. 

"Every fo 
zac, "rapidly 
due to luck, a 
result of a leg 

WUEREVEi 

there Is alwa 
case: if the 
tected, it fall 
he be not, 
deludes. 


is the 
lost in 
ant of 

rtune," 
made, 
discov 
al robb 
there 
ys a f 
paras 
3 to bis 
to his 


most cc 
Jirect, s 
all com 

says I 
is eit 
ery, or 
ery." 
is nattc 
ool in 
te be 
sliare 
whom 


m- 
nd 
pli- 

al- 

tier 
the 

7e 

de- 

if 

he 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 

"Do you enjoy novel-reading. Miss 
Belinda f" "Oh. very much; one 
can associate with people in fiction 
that one wouldn't dare to speak to in 
real life." 



4. — ^Mr. Harrison Ainsworth, the 
novelist, was once asUed whether a 
story told as to the rapid writing 
of tbe fourth book of " Rookwood" 
wns true." 

" True, so far," be rejoined, " that 
I wrote it in twenty-four hours of 
continuous work. I bad previously 
arranged the meeting at Kilburn 
Wells and the death of Tom King— 
a work of some little time— but 
frcim tbe moment I got Turpin on 
the high road I wrote on and on till 
I landed bim at York. 

"I performed this literary feat, 
as you are pleased to call it, with- 
out the slightest sense of effort. I 
liCKan in tbe morning, wrote all 
day, and as tbe night wore on my 
subject had completely mastered 
me, and I had no power to leave 
Turpin on the bigb-rnad. I was 
swept away by tbe curious excite- 
ment and novelty of the situation ; 
ami l)eing personally a good horse- 
man, passionately fond of horses, 
and possessed, moreover, of accu- 
rate knowledge of a great part of 
the country, I was thoroughly at 
home with my work, and galloped 
on with my pet highwayman merrily 
enough. 

'• I must, however, confess that 
when the work was in proof I went 
over the ground between London 
and York to verify the distances 
and localities, and was not a little 
surprised at my accuracy." 

7.— A well - known writer has 
somewhere said that it is a melan- 
choly feature of the present age 
that young people say they cannot 
read Dickens just as they cannot 
rtad Scott. The following dialogue, 
overheard in Westminster Abbey 
one Saturday, lends some colour to 
this averment :— 

He (instructively , pointing loith his 
cane to Dickens's £/raye)—" Charles 
Dickens." 

She (hesitatingly')—" Charles Dick- 
ens. A writer, wasn't he ? " 

He (rather imp-itiently)—" Yes, he 
wrote some tales." 

,s7ie— " Just fancy I" 

8.— Queen Mary"s first attempt to 
escape from the Castle of Loch- 
leven with William Douglas, failed 
through the carelessness of the 
queen herself. 

She had succeeded in leaving the 
castle in the disguise of a laund- 
ress, with whom she had changed 
clothes, and when se.ited in the 
l)oat, which was pushing from the 
shore, she l^etrayed herself by lift- 
ing her hand to her bend. 

The beauty and extreme white- 
ness of that hand discovered her at 
once, and she was carried back to 
her chamber in tears and bitterness 
of heart. 

15.— On tbe recovery of Louis 
XV. from the illness with which he 
bad been attacked at Metz, his ar- 
rival in Paris led to great rejoic- 
ings. On making his entiy, amidst 
the plaudits of the public and the 
illuminations of tbe houses, the 



" sow GOOD WORKS AND THOU SHALT EEAP GLADNESS. 



king perceived a transparency, on 
wliic'b these words were written in 
l;irge letters, " Vive le Roi 1 1 have a 
Million at his service." 

The kirg ordered the procession 
to halt, and inquired wlio was the 
pood and generous citizen thus 
anxious to gratify his monarch's 
wants. The proprietor of the house 
made his appearance, and address- 
ing the king, "Sire," said he, "iny 
name is Million, and my son, wlio is 
called after me, is at tliis monient 
in your majesty's service." The king 
directed the procession to proceed. 

Upon the same occasion, while the 
citizens of Paris vied with each 
other in testifying their joy at the 
liappy event, a shoe-l)lack, wishing 
to join in the public rejoicings, 
purcliased a candle, which he cut 
into fiiur iiieces, and stuck tliein 
on tliefour corners of his shoe-l)OX; 
thus illuminating, as he s;iid to the 
pa3scrs-l)y, " the only spot in the 
world that he could call his own." 

23. — The personal appearance 
and mental characteristics of John 
Keats, the poet, are singularly inter- 
esting to every lover of literature 
and student of human nature. They 
are thus described by one of liis 
biographers :— 

"(Jiiestnut curls cluster around a 
brow which rises up like a very 
temple of mind. Tiie blue eyes are 
changeful, now soft, now fiery. The 
nose is well shaped. The lower part 
of the face does not correspond to 
the beauty of the upper ; i t is narrow, 
and the lips are too full. Still, in 
spiteof this defect, it is a face that 
attracts and interests us, a f.ice 
that has uncommon characters en- 
graved upon it, a face that some- 
how clings to the memory, liis 
figure is tall and well proportioned, 
and Ills broad chest and strong 
slioulders suggest not tiie faintest 
idea of pulmonary disease. 

•' He has a hatred of injustice and 
tyranny that prompts him, as he 
walks along, to stop and take the 
part of every little misused street 
boy. lie has a passionate love for 
beauty, which makes his face as he 
passes through the country on a 
bright day scein a mirror of the 
fair world around him ;. which 
draws from him the words,' Never 
have I known such true delight as 
in watching the growth of Howers' 
He has an animal enjoyment of life 
which makes every hour of health 
and sunshine a festival for him. 
He has a soul in which dwells a 
warm longing for love and fame." 

2S.— Prince Ferdinand was born 
in Vienna, and is the youngest son 
of Prince Augustus of Saxe-Coburg 
and Princess Clementine of Bour- 
bon-Orleans, a daughter of Louis 
I'liilippe. He was offered the 
vacant throne of Bulgaria in 18^7. 
He married the daughter of the 
Duke of I'arma. 

2S.-0n this day in 1834 d-ed.at 
the age of ninety, Mrs. Susan Crom- 
well, youngest daughter of Tboinas 
Cr(miwell, Esq., tlie great-grandson 
of the Protector. She was the last 
of the Protector's descendants who 
bore his name. 



• Thnu slmlt not rob me,thievish Time. 
Of all my blessings, all my joy : 
I hare some jewels in my heart 
Which thou an powerless to destroy.'^ 



his perfect ease and self-possession, tlie keen sense of touch 
possessed by his feet — by which, it is understood, lie was 
solely guided— and his absolutely perfect balance, he was 
as much at his ease on the high rope as an ordinary person 
would be on a street pavement. It is on record that wlicn 
his agent was negotiating for his first appearance at the 
Crj'stal Palace he was asked, "But suppose he should fall?" 
" Fall?" replied the agent, " he can't ! " 

After a tour of the provinces— including a visit to Liverpool, 
where he wheeled a lion in a wheelbarrow across the rope— 
Blondin appeared at the Crystal Palace in the character of an 
ape in apiece by Henry Coleman, entitled The Child of the 
ll^reclc, and he resumed his ordinary tiglit-rope performances 
there in the Exhibition year of 1862. Subsequently he made 
many other appearances in London, in the Provinces, and on 
the Continent. After several years' retirement he reappeared 
in ISSO, and he made his last appearance in public in August, 
1S96, when he performed in Belfast. 

He was playful as a kitten to the last, and, old and white- 
headed as he was, he would sometimes suddenly throw himself 
on his hands in his garden and walk for some seconds with 
his head down and his heels in the air. His "Niagara 
House " was on the high road between Brentford and Hanwell. 
It had a pretty garden and extensive workshops, in which he 
amused himself at the forge, bench, and lathe. He had 
achieved everything proper to his career, except a mastery of 
our tongue, and that, of course, was not essential. He 
sjioke broken English to the last. He could not read a word 
of English. 

When he came off the rope after a performance he •was 
generally bathed in perspiration. Attendants were waiting 
lor him, and the first thing was a rub down. Then he had 
something to eat, prepared by his own cook. If he had to give 
another performance later in the day, he had a two-hours' sleep. 

He would never hear of the approach of old age. "So 
long I can perform, I perform," he said, " that my 
health." Yet he had to admit some infirmities. "I don't 
carry anyone across now," he remarked near the close of his 
career, "and I don't ride the bicycle. I can't see at all in 
Ihe sunshine. I performed every week last year, besides 
getting married. I was on the rope again after a honeymoon 
of twenty-four hours ! I am now going to rest for a month or 
two, as my blind eye is to be operated upon for cataract." 

When he began to be subjected to fits of giddiness, he re- 
marked that he should be obliged to have his house fitted up 
\vith tight ropes, or he might one day dash his brains out in 
trying to walk across the floor. In crossing the rope with tlie 
sack on, he said the rope really steadied him by showing him 
by the way it hung, that he was, or was not, standing perpen- 
dicularly. 

Once he was nearly killed at the Crystal Palace at the close 
of a firework ascent. He slipped and fell. Down went the 
pole to the ground, and he was about to follow wlien he 
managed to catch the rope witli his knee joint, and to hold it 
until "he could swing himself backwards and forwards into 
touch of it with his hands. He courted danger. Once, at 
the Zoological Gardens, Liverpool, he wheeled a lion across — 
securely strapped to the barrow — and here again he played 
one of his favourite tricks on the nerves of the spectators by 
pretending tliat he had lost control of the barrov/ and that it 
w IS all up with him. 

It may appear singular that the rope Blondin used in his 
later performances was only half the thickness of former 
ropes— viz., one inch and a half instead of three inches in 
diameter. That was due to the fact that a wire was run 
tlirough the rope, and the necessary strength obtained at a 
less outlay of hemp and also money ; of course, it only 
rt quired half the space when packed for travelling. It was 
packed in drums— each drum, when full, weighing a ton — 
there were thirteen such drums for conveying the main and 
subsidiary ropes. 



3rd Month, 1 
1899. J 



MARCH— 31 days. 



r EXAlIrLB IS 

Lbbttee than precept. 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 

Last Quarter 5tli, 

New Moon lltli, 

First Quarter 19th, 

Pall Moon 27th, 



7 min. past 4 morning. 

53 min. past 7 afternoon. 

24 min. past 3 morning. 

18 miu. past 6 morning. 



LE BRUIT PEND L'hOMME— 
A MAN. 



-REPUTE HANGS 



M 

Tu 

W 

Til 

F 

S 



St. David's Day. 

John Wesley died, 1791. 

"Habit is second nature." 
Saladin died at Damascus, 1193. 



5rtr ^xttttra^ in W^nt, 

Michael Angelo, artist, born, 1474. 
Pope Innocent XIII. died, 1724. 

" Step by step one goes far." 
William I., (German Emperor) d., IS 
Prince of Wales married, 1863. 
Income Tax imposed, 1842. 



4tlj .^itntra^ itt l^citt. 

Marshal Richelieu born, 1696. 
Humbert, King of Italy, born, 1844. 
Close Season for Fresli-ivater Fish begins. 
Duchess of Kent, Queen's mother, d., 
St. Patrick's Day. [1861. 

Princess Louise born, 1848. 



6t\j MnnH^ in ^znt. 

Spring covimences. 

Robert Southey, poet, died, 1843. 

Rev. Adam Sedgwick, geol., b., 1785. 

" What smarts, teaches." 
Queen Elizabeth died, 1603. 
Anmmciation — Lady Day. 



31LF 



Palm ^utttra^. 

26. Duke of Cambridge born, 1819. 
Duke of Albany died, 1884. 
Hilary Law Sittings end. 
29—31. The Three ''Borrowed Days." 
Good Friday. 



Sux 
Rises 
&Sets 


JMOON 

Rises 
&Sets 


6 49r 
5 39s 


liises 
P.M. 

1156 


6 44r 


Morn. 


5 43s 


1 11 


6 40r 


2 18 


5 46s 


3 16 


6 35r 


4 2 


5 50s 


4 38 


6 31r 


6 6 


5 53s 


5 29 


6 26r 


Sets 
P.M. 


5 57s 


7 23 


6 22r 


8 45 


6 Os 


10 5 


617r 


1120 


6 4s 


Morn. 


6 13r 


29 


6 7s 


130 


6 8r 


2 19 


6 10s 


2 58 


6 4r 


3 28 


6 14s 


3 53 


6 59r 


4 12 


6 17s 


4 30 


5 55r 


4 46 


6 21s 


5 2 


5 50r 

6 24s 


Pises 
P.M. 

8 28 


5 46r 


9 44 


6 27s 


10 58 


5 41r 


Morn. 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



In nothing do men approach 
so nearly to the gods, as in 
giving health to men. 

When we are willing, we shall 
be surprised at how mtich we 
can do. A child can hold a 
candle for a strong man to tVork I 



If ycmrcoKscience approves of 
•everything you do,it's a sure sign 
you are beooiiiing conceited. 

Thb; goodiwss of some people 
is like some kinds of flsli— you 
must pick ®tit a good many 
toones before 3'ou get anything 
worth having. 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 

I submit that Duty is a power 
which riseth with us in the morning, 
and goes to rest with us at night. It 
is coextensive with the action of our 
intelligence. It is the shadow which 
cleaves to us wherever we go, and 
which only leaves us when we leave 
the light of life.~W. E. Gladstone. 

2.— The Rev. John Wesley was a 
great advocate of early rising. 
'■ Healthy men," he says in one of 
his works, "require little above six 
hours' sleep, a healthy woman a 
little above seven, in four and 
twenty. If anyone desires to know 
exactly what quantity of sleep his 
own constitution requires, he may 
very easily make the experiment 
which I made about sixtyyears ago. 
I then waked every night about 
twelve or one, and lay awake for 
some time. I readily concluded 
that this arose from my being longer 
in bed than nature required. 

"To be satisfied I procured an 
alarum, which waked me next 
morning at seven (near an hour 
earlier than I rose the day beforej, 
yet I lay awake again at night. The 
second morning I rose at six, but 
notwithstanding this I lay awake 
the second niglit. The third morn- 
ing 1 rose at Hve, but nevertheless 
I lay awake the third night. The 
fourth morning I rose at four, as 
I have done ever since, and I lay 
awake no more. 

"And I do not now lie awake, 
taking the year round, a quarter of 
an hour together in a month. By 
the same experiment, rising earlier 
and earlier every morning, may one 
find how much sleep he really 
wants." 

13.— M. de Richelieu, the father 
of Marshal Richelieu, was as incon- 
stant m friendship as others are in 
love, and his friends could always 
see what place they bad in liis heart 
by the positions which their por- 
traits had in his house. 

When he first formed a friendship 
with anyone, he had his portrait 

Eainted, and placed it at the foot of 
is bed ; and as new friendships 
succeeded, the picture passed from 
its first position to the chamber 
door, from the chamber to the ante- 
chamber, from thence to the corri- 
dor, and finally to the garret. 

16i— An astronomer almost as 
eminent as the great Sir William 
Herschel himself was his sister, 
Caroline Lucretia Herschel, who was 
born 149 years ago, on the 16th of 
March, 1750. Many of the comets, 
nelntlae, and clusters of stars men- 
tioned in her brother's catalogue 
were described from her original 
observations ; and in 1828 she was 
awarded the Gold Medal of the 
Astronomical Society. 

21.— The character of the poet 
Southey, according to Coleridge, 
was all that is estimable, and has 
for its only enemies, " qmicks in 
education, quacks in politics, and 
quacxs in criticism." The Ettrick 
Shepherd says, "Southey is as 
elei-'Mnt a writer as any in the king- 
doni. But those wiio would love 
Southey as well as admire liijn, 
must see him in thebosoni,not only 
(if one lovely family, liut of three, 
all attached to him a- a father, 
and all elegantly maintained and 



HAPPY IS HE THAT IS HAPPT IN HIS CHILDREN.' 



educated, it is generally said, by his 
indefatigable pen." 

22.— The geologist, if he be fairly 
in earnest, is far too tired, after his 
day's work, to trouble himself about 
the aristocratic air of his quarters, 
and, besides, generally manages to 
put his outer man into so untidy a 
condition that a grand hotel would 
have some scruple in taking him in. 

Professor Sedgwick, after a hard 
morning's work, betook himself to 
a village inn for a lunch of bread 
and cheese. When he asked what 
he had to pay, he was told four- 
pence. Fe could not avoid remark- 
ing on the smallness of the cliarge. 
"Ah, sir," said the landlady, "I 
should ask eightpcnce from anyone 
else, but I only asked fourpence 
from you, for I see that you have 
known better days." 

On another occasion, tired, and 
with his pockets full of the day's 
treasures, he mounted astage-coach, 
and fell fast asleep. Waking at his 
journey's end, he was horrified to 
find his pockets as empty as when 
he set out. An old woman who sat 
beside him, feeling the pockets full 
of stones, took him for a madman, 
who had loaded himself more effec- 
tually to insure drowning, so she 
slyly picked out the fossils, one by 
one, from the drowsy philosopher, 
and tossed them on the roadside. 

24i— What makes the name of 
Queen Bess so famous is the 
splendour of her times. During 
lier long reign the true greatness 
of our country began. An un- 
equalled literature arose, with 
Shakespeare, Spenser, and Bacon as 
its brightest ornaments. Under 
Probisher and Drake maritime 
adventure flourished, and the 
foundations of our naval force 
were laid. Commerce was developed. 
The social condition of the people 
was also greatly improved. 

31.— The following story, illus" 
trative of the Lincolnshire super" 
Btition that persons born on Good 
Friday night cannot be frightened, 
has been told by a fellow-servant of 
its hero and its victim. 

About fifty years ago, there was a 
lad living on a farm who had been 
born on Good Friday night, and who, 
therefore, could not be frightened. 
One of his mates determined to test 
his immunity, and, covering himself 
with a white sheet, waylaid him, on 
a dark night, in the churchyard. 
Tlie lad coolly asked what he was 
"fooling at," and knocked him down 
with a stick he was carrying. 

When he got home he was asked 
by some who were in the plot 
whether he had met anything. He 
replied that Jim had tried to frighten 
him, but he had "lamed" him a 
lesson. 

As " Jim " did not return to the 
house, he was sought for, and found 
dead. The "lesson" had been 
effectual. 



Come, gentle spring, cetherial mild- 
less come ! 

And from the bosom of yon dropping 
cloud, 

Wliile music wakes around, veil'd in 
a ahow'r 

Of shadowing roses, on our plains 
descend. Thomson. 



THE INVENTOR OF PHONOGRAPHY. 



SIR ISAAC PITMAN, the inventor of phonography— a 
system of shorthand which is now most extensively 
employed in journalistic work and general corre- 
spondence—was horn on the 4th January, 1813, at Trowbridge, 
Wiltshire, where his father long filled the position of clerk 
and overseer in a factory. 

On leaving school the boy entered the same service as his 
father in the capacity of junior clerk. He was of studious 
disposition, and occupied much of his lei.sure in reading. lu 
1820, lie took up the study of Harding's edition of Taylor's 
system of shorthand. Two years later he left the factory 
clerkship and became a teacher, lauding at last at Bath, 
where he carried on a school till 1843. 

Long before this, however, he had been working away at 
the development of his system of shorthand. His object in 
taking it up was to cheapen and popularise an art which he 
foresaw would convert what was then, to a large extent, 
looked upon as a pleasant pastime, into a profitable pro- 
fession. Before the days of phonography text-books on 
shorthand were scarce and expensive, while there were few of 
the opportunities which now everywhere exist for acquiring a 
knowledge of stenography. 

To Isaac Pitman belongs the credit of inaugurating a new 
era in shorthand writing. His books on the subject were 
published at a price which made them accessible to all, and 
his system of phonography was so comparatively easy of 
mastery that in course of time it found popular favour. 

In 1837, the year of the Queen's accession, Mr. Pitman's 
first book on the subject— " Stenographic Soundhand" — 
appeared, and paved the way for a series of handbooks which 
have brought about a development in shorthand writing as 
amazing as it has been continuous. Other causes, of course, 
assisted in bringing about this result. The abolition of the 
advertisement and paper duties led to a great increase in the 
number of daily newspapers, and a consequent demand for 
skilled reporters. 

For years Mr. Pitman was ever and anon effecting what he 
considered improvements on his system of shorthand, though 
they were not always so regarded by phonographic experts. 
Indeed, in course of half a century it underwent changes 
which rendered the earlier editions of phonography somewhat 
puzzling to later disciples of the art and vice versa. As to its 
popularity there can be no question. 

But it required arduous and persistent efforts on the part 
of the founder to have the value of phonography recognised 
in the way in which it is now everywhere acknowledged. At 
the outset Mr. Pitman had a hard struggle to convince the 
public of the utility of such a system of writing. In and out 
of season, however, he wrote and lectured on the subject, 
and in due time he reaped his reward. 

Yet the beginning of Isaac Pitman's literary enterprise was 
quite unambitious. He set up the types for his own books, 
read the proofs, kept his accounts, and attended to the 
correspondence, being at his desk every morning by six 
o'clock. "When the business began to prosper, Mr. Pitman 
opened a warehouse in London for the sale of his works, and 
afterwards erected the Phonetic Institute in Bath, which is 
one of the most attractive buildings in the town so celebrated 
for its thermal springs. 

The library of phonography is now an extensive one, and 
includes some of the finest works in literature. That of 
books in phonetic type is less extensive, for this system of 
spelling, notwithstanding Mr. Pitman's persistent advocacy 
of it, has not obtained anything approaching the popularity 
possessed by phonography. 

In 1887, the jubilee of phonography was celebrated in 
London, Lord Rosebery acting as president. Mr. Pitman 
was knighted in 1894, and died in 1897. 



4th Month,! 

1899. J 



APRIL— 30 days. 



ALL MEN 
CAX'T BE FIRST. 



TEE MOON'S CHANGES 

Last Q uarter Srd, . . 

New JEoon 10th, .. 

First Quarter I7th, . . 

Full Moon ;.. 25th, ., 



56 mill, past 11 moriiirig. 

21 min. past 6 nionung. 
43 min. past 10 afternoon. 

22 min. past 7 afternoon. 



NTJL FEU SANS FDMj5e NO FIRE 

WITHOUT SMOKE. 



1|S 



2 
3 


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4 


Tu 


5 


W 


6 


Th 


7 


F 


8S 


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10 


M 


11 


Tu 


12 


W 


13 


Th 


14 


F 


15 


S 


16 
17 


5 
M 


18 


Tu 


19 


W 


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Th 


21 


F 


22 


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23 

24 


M 


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Tu 


26 


W 


27 


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28 


F 


29 


S 



9. King of the Belgians born, 1S35. 
Easter Law Sittings begin. 

" The rich have many friends." 
Edict of Nantes issued, 1598. 
Princess Beatrice born, 1857. 
Cuckoo first heard about this time. 



30|^ 



AllFools' Day. Prince Bismarck b.,'15. 5 



faster ^ittt&a^. 

Easteb Monday.— Bank Holiday. 

" A fool is never wrong." 
Dividends on Consols, dc, due. 
Albert Durer, artist, d. 1528. 
8. King of Denmark born, 1818. 
Lady Day Fire Insurance ceases. 



2ttii ^untra^ after Chaster. 

16. Battle of Culloden, 1746. 
" Love knows not labour." 

Lord Beaconsfleld d., 18?rl. — Primrose 

[Dajj. 
King of Roumania born, 1839. 

Baroness Burdett-Coutts born, 1814. 
Royal Society founded, 1662. 



5rtr ^utttJau after (B aster, 

23. St. George's Day. Shakespeare d., 
Tasso, Italian poet, d., 1595. D-^'i-^- 
Oliver Cromwell born, 1599. 

"■Beauty is hut skin deep." 
Thomas Beltcrton, actor, died, 1710. 
SO. Duke of Argyll born, 1823. 



4tlT ,^«ttirau after faster. 



Sun 
Rises 
&Scts 


Moon 

Rises 
&Sets 


5 39r 


Risps 
A.M. 


6 32s 


1 11 


5 34r 


159 


6 35s 


2 37 


5 30r 


3 7 


6 39s 


3 31 


5 25r 


3 52 


6 42s 


4 11 


5 21r 


4 30 


6 45s 


Sets 
P.M. 


5 16r 


8 56 


6 49s 


10 9 


5 121- 


U 14 


6 52s 


Morn. 


5 8r 


10 


6 55s 


53 


5 3r 


128 


6 59s 


154 


4 59r 


2 16 


7 2s 


2 36 


4 55r 


2 52 


7 5s 


3 7 


4 51r 


3 23 


7 9s 


3 42 


4 47r 


Rises 
P.M. 


7 12s 


8 44 


4 43r 


9 58 


7 1os 


11 3 


4 39r 


1156 


7 18s 


Morn. 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



One great reason why virtue 
is so little practised, is its being 
so ill understood. 

It is sweet to feel by what 
fine spini threads our affections 
are drawn together. 

To act upon a determination 
made in anger, is like embark- 
ing in a vessel during a storm. 



TuERE are men who never 
help the world much until they 
get out of it. 

Thy secret is thy servant till 
thou reveal it, and then thou 
art its servant. 

THEViinity of human life is 
like a river, constantly passing 
away, and yet constantly com- 
ing- on. 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 



lOM must ao to led now, dear. 
You know the chickens all ao to roost 
icith the stm." " Yes, but then their 
mamma always goes with them." 

6. — Bellini was one of PUrer's 
best friends at Venice, when Diirer 
visited that fHuious city, and the 
Venetian nrtist asked Diirer, when 
imrting, for one of his pencils nsa 
k'epsako— one of the pencils' with 
which Diirer drew the fine lines 
that especially won the admiration 
of the painters of Venice. 

Diirer offered liim a handful of 
pencils. "Take whiih you like best, 
fir I can do the lines with all of 
them." 

The skill was not in the tools— it 
was iu the workman. 

13, The Edict of Nantes re- 
mained in operation for eighty- 
seven years, and was suddenly 
revoked hy Louis XiV. in lii8.5. It 
WIS one of the notalde events of 
the seventeenth century. 

15.— There is an old rhyme which 
tells us that— 

The cuckoo is a bonny bird, 

.S7ie sings as she flies ; 
fhe brin'is us good tidings, 

Hhc tells us no lies. 
She sucks little birds' eggs 
To make her voice clear. 
And she sines '• Cuckoo ! " 
Three months in the year. 

Tlie cuckoo is the subject of one 
of the oldest English songs now rc- 
ii'Mining, which is to be found in the 
ll.-irl"ian MS.,No.978. It dates from 
thi: thii'teenth century, and is ac- 
compauied with musical notes— the 
obiert example of secubir music 
c.xiant. It is in old ICiiglish, but 
may be easily translated:— 
Sinnnicr is icu;ncn in, 

Lhude sing caeca ; 
Groicelh sed an.d bloiceth m(d. 

And springeth the wde nu. 

Sing Cuccul 
A we bletclh after lomb, 

Lhouth after calve cu ; 
Dalluc stertitli, buck verteth [goes to 

Murie sing cuccn, Iferu']; 

Vuccul Cuccut 
Wei sings the. cuccu: 
Ke swiic Inevcr ceas^e] Ihu naver nu. 

0£ all poets who have sung tlie 
praises of this spring birdi the 
gr^ateit ;ind best, perhaps, is \Vii- 
liani Wordsworth. Here are two 
of the verses he wrote about the 
cuckoo :— 
blithe neic-comer! T have heard, 

I hear thee and rejoice ; 
cuckoo I shall I call thee bird, 

Or but a wandering voice ? 
Thrice icelcome, darling of the spi ing 

Even yet thou art to me 
No bird, but an invisible thing, 

A voice, amysteiy J 

Chaucer links the cuckoo with 
the nightingale, and John Logan 
—or is It JNIichael Uruce?— h.is made 
the bird the suliject of a famous 
poem. He says :— 

Sireet bird ! thy boicer is ever green. 

Thy sky is iw. r clear ; 
Thiiu hatt no sorrow in thy song, 

No ivinter in thy year. 



GOOD DEEDS EEMLAIN : ALL THINGS ELSE PEEISH. 



16. rn point of numbers tlie 
Battle of Cullodeii was not impos- 
ing, (inly aiiout i isht tliou.saiid men 
being engaged on eacli side but it 
Was of last'ng importance as 
settling tlie claims of tlie expatri- 
ated house of Stuart to tlie liriiisli 
throne. 

19. — Thp Earl of Beaconsfl-^ld 
ust'd to characterise as his best iiiul 
bis retort on the Taunton elector 
when he was standing for that 
borough. On the dny of nomination 
the opposing cnndidate uttered a 
string of platitmles upon which lie 
declared himself determiuLd to 
"stand." 

"And what do ynu stand npon ?" 
cried a man in the cowd when it 
came to Mr. Disraeli's turn to sp' ak. 

".-ir,"'was the iimiiediate lep'.y, 
" I stand upon my heaa." 

23.— Dryden, in one of his pre- 
faces, speaking of our great dra- 
matist, says, "He was the mau 
who, of all modern, and, pe haps, 
ancient i octs, liad liie largest and 
most comprehensive .•^oul. All the 
images of nature were still present 
to him, and he drew them not 
laboriously, but luckily ; when he 
describes any thing, you Miore than 
see it, you feel it lOO. Those who 
accuse Iiira to have wanted learn- 
ing, give him the greater com- 
mendation : he was nUurally 
learned ; he needed not the spec- 
tacles of b oks to read nature; he 
looked inwards, and found her 
there. 

I cannot say he is everywhere 
alike ; were he so I should do liim 
an injury to compare him with tlie 
greatest of mankind, He is mmy 
'iiiie- flat, insipid; i;is coraick wit 
degenerating into clenches, his 
serious swelling into bonilia^t. 
lint he s always t-'reat when some 
great occasion is presented to him ; 
uo man can s:iy he ever had a lit 
subject for his wit, and did not, 
raise him.elf above the best of 
poets." 

25. The last words of Tasso, the 
famous Italian poet, were: '•Into 
Thy hands, O Lord 1 " 

26. The Protector was fond of 
social amusements and brilli;int 
asseml)lies. He was passionately 
fond of music, and took delight in 
surrounding himself with musicians 
and iu listening to their perform- 
ances. His Court became, under 
the direction of his daughters, 
numerous and gay. 

Cromwell, however, was not very 
dignified in his habits. He was. iu 
truth, a man of a coarse humour, 
fond of playing tricks of a rough 
and chililish character. It is well 
authenticated that at the marri.ige 
of his daughter Frances to Mr. Rich 
in 1657, not a year before his death, 
he amused himself by throwing 
about sack possett among the ladies 
to spoil their clothes. He also 
flung wet sweetmeats about, and 
with the same article daubed the 
stools on which the ladies were to 
sit. 



THOROUGHLY SUBDUED. 
Her charms subdued Mm ere they 

wed. 
But now her tongue does it instead. 



SCHOLAR, TRAVELLER, AND AUTHOR. 

AMONGST authors there have been few with a more 
unique and interesting personality than George Bor- 
row, the author of "The Bible in Spain," and many 
other well-known books. 

He was born at East Dereham, Norfolk, in 1803, his father 
being a Cornish man and captain of a regiment of militia, his 
ijiother being descended from a Huguenot family. He had 
only one brother, a beautiful, clever, and amiable lad, who 
died when he had just reached manhood. 

Borrow himself seems to have been a dull child, and of 
unprepossessing appearance. He dates the growth of his 
faculty for learning from that never-to-be-forgotten day when 
" Robinson Crusoe " fell into his hands. He read it, and re- 
read it, and gazed with wonder and delight on its pictures. 
From that moment he studied with avidity, and was seized 
with the longing, which never left him, to become a scholar 
and a traveller. 

He was naturally active and strong, and fond of outdoor 
pursuits. Shooting and riding he delighted in; but he fell 
asleep over the fishing-rod— it was too slow. Borrow was 
born to be a wanderer. 

In his boyhood he accompanied his father's regiment in all 
its changes of residence, and thus became early accustomed 
to variety of scene. When he first visited Scotland, he tells 
us that at the sight of the noble river Tweed he was so 
affected that he wept with admiration. He remaiued for a 
year or two in Edinburgh, where his home was with the 
garrison in the Castle. 

At that time the Nor' Loch filled the valley now occupied 
by the beautiful Princes Street Gardens, and " bickers " were 
still common between "New Town" and "Old Town," in 
which Borrow took a frequent and willing part. He became 
a pupil, too, of Edinburgh's famous High School, where he 
was soon tauglit, what was then held to be, the inferiority of 
the English to the Scotch. But when the boys found how 
well he could fight and stand persecution, they became 
magnanimous, and the "champion" declared that "the 
English, although a wee thocht behind the Scotch, are no to 
be sneezed at. I respect England, for I have an auntie 
married there ! " 

To the grief of his parents, BorroAV took to the Scotch 
tongue with avidity ; they were still more shocked when 
residing in Clonmel, to find that their boy actually gloried 
in learning the " wild Irish." Borrow had been born with a 
passion for languages : before he was eighteen years of age he 
understood English, Welsh, Irish, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, 
German, Danish, French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese. 

In mature life it is said that he knew at least thirty different 
tongues. The gipsies called him "Lavengro," or "word- 
master," just as they had called him on one occasion " Sapen- 
gro," or "snake-master," when they found him carrying about 
a tame viper for a pet ! 

Borrow's father at last settled permanently at Norwich, 
where his son attended the Grammar School till he was 
fifteen. For the next five years he passed through the 
drudgery of a legal apprenticeship. But while Blackstone lay 
on the desk lid, which was supported by Borrow's head — 
"law " (as George Meredith says) "being thus brought into 
direct contact with his brain-pan" — "Ab. Gwilym," the Welsh 
Bard, lay inside the desk, and absorbed the whole attention 
of this youth with the passion for languages. So he became 
proficient in Welsh, but remained a novice iu law. " I have 
ever loved to be as explicit as possible ; on which account I 
have never attained to any proficiency in the law, the essence 
of which is said to be ambiguity," he caustically says. 

Borrow went to a law office, simply to please liis parents ; 
so, when in 1823 his father died, he abandoned thi? profession 
and went to London to seek his fortune, carrying under his 



5th Montb,-) 
1899. J 



MAY— 31 days. 



PBAISH 18 THE 
HIRE OF TIBTXJB. 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 

Last Quarter 2nd, 47 min. past 5 afternoon. 

New Moon 9th, 39 min. past 5 afternoon. 

First Quarter 17th, 13 min. past 5 afternoon. 

Full Moon 25th, 49 min. past 5 morning. 

Last Quarter 31st, 55 min. past 10 afternoon. 



MAUVAISE HERBE CROIT TOUJOUES ILL 

WEEDS GROW APACE. 


Sun 
Rises 
&Sets 

4 35r 


Moon 
Rises 
&Sets 

liiSPS 

A.M. 


1 


1 


IM 


Bank Holiday in Scotland. 


21 


2 


|Tu 


1. Duke of Connaught born, 1850. 


7 22s 


1 10 


c 


8 


W 


Thumas Hcod, poet, died, 1845. 


4 31r 


135 


23 


4 


Th 


" A good ivife is a good prize." 


7 25s 


156 


24 


5 


F 


Napoleon I. died, 1821. 


4 28r 


2 16 


25 


6 


S 


Humboldt, famous naturalist, d., 1859. 


7 28s 
4 24r 


2 35 
2 55 


26 


7 


5 


Ho^attott ^uttira^. 


27 


8 


M 


7. Lord Rosebery born, 1847. 


7 31s 


3 17 


28 


9 


Tu 


Frederick Schiller, poet, died, 1805. 


4 21r 


Sets 
P.M. 


• 


10 


VV 


Indian Mutinj' commenced, 1857. 


7 34s 


8 58 


1 


11 


Th 


Ascension Day.— Holy Thursday. 


4 17r 


9 58 


2 


12 


F 


The Tear 1317 of the Mohammedan Era 
[.commences. 


7 38s 


10 47 


3 


13 


S 


Hudson's Bay Company founded,1670. 


4 14r 
7 41s 


1125 
1155 


4 


14 


^ 


^utttra^ aftrr ^aanstctt. 


5 


15 


M 


Whitsunday. Scottish Quarter Day. 


411r 


Morn. 


6 


16 


Tu 


"Hot love is soon cold." 


7 44s 


19 


7 


17 


VV 


King of Spain born, 1886. 


4 8r 


38 


)) 


18 'I'll 


Nicholas II., Czar of Russia, b,, 1868. 


7 47s 


55 


9 


19 i^^ 


Easter Law Sittings end. 


4 5r 


1 11 


10 


20 8 


19. RtHon. W.E.Gladstone died,lS98. 


7 49s 
4 3r 


127 
144 


11 


21 


^ 


Wih'tt ^ixnhajy : |p tnttcozt. 


12 


22 


M 


JVhit Monday. Bank Holiday. 


7 52s 


2 3 


13 


23 


Tu 


22. Victor Hugo died, 1885. 


4 Or 


2 27 


14 


24 


W 


Queen Victoria born, 1819. 


7 55s 


2 57 


15 


25 


Th 


R.W. Emerson, American essayist, liorn, 


3 58r 


Rises 
P.M. 


O 


26 


F 


Duchess of York born, 1867. 


7 57s 


9 50 


17 


27 


S 


Calvin, religious reformer, died, 1564. 


3 56r 

8 Os 


10 36 

11 11 


18 


28 


S 


Srittit^ ^utttrajj. 


19 


29 


M 


Restoration of Charles II., 1660. 


3 54r 


1140 


20 


30 


Tu 


Trinity Law Sittings iegin. 


8 2s 


Morn. 


21 


31 


W 


" Who knows most says least." 


3 52r 


2 


a 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



Call him wise whose actions, 
words, and steps are all a clear 
because to a clear why. 

Men are like weatbercocks, 
wbicli are never constant or 
fixed liut when they are worn 
out or rusty. 



Please the eyes and ears 
and you will win tlic heart. 

It is no consolation to a 
patient suffering from a severe 
cold in the head to be told 
that "colds always attack the 
weakest spot." 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 

The way to wring every scrap of 
happiness out of life is to enjoy every 
good thing aa it comes, and not spend 
precious time in bewailing what can 
never come to pass, or what is gone 
for ever. 

6. — Napoleon I., who was ex- 
tremely thin in the early days of his 
generalship, though he afterwards 
became somewhat stout, was once 
present at a bread riot during the 
last days of the revolutionary period. 

The mob was led by an extremely 
stout woman, who, seeing Bona- 
parte and his staff ride up, called 
out to the mob : " Down with the 
shoulder s'trappers 1 Down with 
these chaps who feed and fatten, 
while the people die of hunger ! " 

"Come, come! my good woman," 
said Napoleon, " look at me, and tell 
me which of us two is the fatter." 

The laugh which followed dis- 
armed the mob much more com- 
pletely than a cavalry charge could 
have done. 

6,— One October afternoon, as 
Humboldt, the great naturalist, was 
passing through a market, his eye 
fell on a pair of horse pistols inlaid 
with peai-1, which attracted his 
attention by reason of their anti- 
quated design and artistic work- 
manship. He purchased them, and 
on his way home made the inter- 
esting discovery that the paper in 
which they were wrapped consisted 
of a leaf torn out of an old "Book 
of Herbs." 

In order to resciie from destruc- 
tion the remainder of this ancient 
specimen of the art of printing, 
Humboldt at once retraced his 
steps to the market. But he was 
unable to find the vendor of the 
pistols, for all the brokers imagined 
ihat he had come to cancel the 
bargain. However, on his assur- 
ance that he wanted to return some 
change he had received in excess, 
all the brokers rushed out of their 
shops to reiiort themselves. 

Thus beleaguered on all sides, the 
great savant threatened them with 
his pistols, which had the effect of 
scattering the crowd and causing 
the real vendor to declare himself 
liy requesting the gentlemnn to put 
up his pistols, as they were not 
loaded, adding he was now prepared 
to receive the money. 

Humboldt followed the broker 
into his dingy store, asked to see 
the old book in questioa, which, 
with its vellum binding, he found, 
with the exception of a few leaves 
torn out at the end, to be in a good 
state of preservation, and an ex- 
ceedingly rare specimen of its kind. 

On being asked the price of the 
volume, the broker took down an 
old pair of trousers that had been 
reseated, and replied: "Give n;e 
twelve shillings and you shall have 
these nice trousers into the bargain. 
They'll serve for you to cut a dash 
in on Sundays ! " 

The bargain was concluded, but 
Humboldt declined the nether ap- 
pendages. 

In after years, when showing 
friends the treasures of his library, 
he never failed to i ecuunt the story 
of the purchase of the old " Book of 
Herbs." 



"A BLYTHE HEAEl: MAKES A BLOOMING VISAGE." 



25. — Some years ago a friend 
thus wrote from his own knowledge 
of the late R. W. Emerson, the 
American philosopher :—" To get a 
clear and adequate conception of 
Emerson, one must see him at home, 
in undress, so to speak, if lie may 
be considered as ever in uniform, 
who is the soul of simplicity and 
sincerity. He is the kindest of 
husbands, the most considerate of 
fathers. 

"It is related of him that, when 
any thought strikes him, when any 
suggestion occurs, or any pat quota- 
tion is recalled, he invariably stops 
the thing he is doing and jots down 
the thought or suggestion for 
future use or reference. Even in 
the middle of the night he observes 
this habit, knowing that a good 
thing may be lost for ever unless 
recorded. 

" Before his second wife got used 
to his ways, she would ask him, 
when he arose to strike a light, 
' Are you ill, husband ? ' ' No, my 
dear,' he would reply, 'only an 
idea.' . . 

" Nobody has ever seen him out 
of temper, or even ruffled. He is 
the embodiment of calm courtesy, 
of placid refinement — the very 
reverse of the supremely nervous, 
irritable being an author is believed 
to be, and often is, in truth." 

27.— It must be said of Calvin 
that in all he did he was firmly 
convinced of the righteousness of 
his cause. He never sinned aguinst 
his conscience ; never even parleyed 
with his conscience. He spared 
not himself. Never strong, his 
untiring zeal, energy, and activity 
were extraordinary. If he made 
mistakes, they were few and far 
l)etween. The good he did to the 
Protestant cause was incalculable. 
He had to fight against tremendous 
foes, the bitterest opposition, and 
he triumphed over all. 

He was a man more to be feared 
than to he loved, but, from his 
intellectual greatness, he no doubt 
felt himself separated from most 
of his companions, and, from his 
boyhood, had always shown himself 
indifferent to friendship. His whole 
life and soul and devotion lay in 
his cause ; for which, indeed, he 
shortened his days. 

29. Till 1859 a religious service 
was observed in every church and 
chapel in England to celebrate the 
Restoration of Charles II.— in the 
words of the Act of Parliament, 
" to render thanks to God for 'the 
King's peaceable restoration to 
actual possession and exercise of 
his legal authority over his 
people," 



MORNING. 

See the day begins to break. 
And the light shoots like a streak 
Of subtle fire, the wind blows cold. 
While the morning doth unfold : 
Now the birds begin to rovse, 
And the squirrel from the boughs 
Leaps to get in nuts and fruit, • 
The early lark, that erst was mute, 
Carols to the rising day 
Many a note and many a lay." 
Faithful Shephekdess. 



arm his translations of certain Welsh, German, and Danish 

letters. 

In London he found that the drudgery of a literary ap- 
prenticeship was at least as bad as a legal one. He became 
a hack wi-iter to Sir Richard Philips of the Monthly Magazine, 
and assisted him to compile the " Newgate Calendar," but 
could find no publisher for his ballads. His remuneration 
barely allowed him to live ; and his master was harsh and 
tyrannical. But all the time Borrow was still studying in the 
great world-school, and learning all he could of men and 
languages. Getting tired of servitude, his gipsy nature 
asserted itself once more, and he left London and wandered 
through England with a bundle and a stick, and met with 
many wonderful adventures, which are recounted in his 
marvellously fascinating manner in " Lavengro" and " Romany 
Rye." 

Then came his fortunate appointment as agent of the Bible 
Society, in which capacity he visited France, Spain, Germany, 
Russia, and Morocco. On his return in 1840 he married 
Mary Clarke, the widow of a naval officer whom he had met 
in Spain, and settled down at Oulton, near Lowestoft, in 
Suffolk, where his wife possessed a small estate. Here he 
wrote in 1841 "The Gipsies in Spain," and in 1842 his famous 
" Bible in Spain." 

In 1844 he visited Hungary and Turkey with the object of 
still further improving his acquaintance with the gipsies, 
collecting and writing down their songs, and bringing back 
with him also a beautiful Arab horse, on which he loved to 
ride about and create a sensation. And a sensation indeed he 
seems to have created wherever he went, for he had a 
splendid figure, was 6 feet 2 inches in height, had splendid 
brown eyes, an oval, beardless face, a loud, rich voice, and a 
great mass of silvery hair. 

In 1850 Borrow published " Lavengro," that romantic auto- 
biography, which he continued in 1857 under the name of 
"Romany Rye." A tour in Wales gave birth to his "Wild 
Wales"; and in 1874 he published " Romany Lavo-Lil," an 
account of the English gipsy language. His later years were 
spent in great retirement ; and he died at Oulton in the begin- 
ning of August, 1881. 

The " Bible in Spain," perhaps the best known of his works, 
was published in December, 1842, and was at once received 
with enthusiastic praise. And no wonder ! for it was a record 
of stirring adventure in a country little known, and written 
by a man who knew how to make the most of his story. 

Theodore Watts speaks of Borrow as " a splendid literary 
amateur"; but he was by no means an amateur when he 
wrote the " Bible in Spain." He may not have arrived at 
his literary power through the usual channels ; but he had 
already served a good apprenticeship to literature, and studied 
the best models. And in this book he mingles life-like de- 
scription with romantic adventure and brisk dialogue in such 
a way that the interest of the reader never flags. 

One secret of his success is that the author is himself 
enthusiastically interested in his subject. Spain, as he tells 
us, had been to him always a country of romance, and had 
filled the day-dreams of his youth. He was thoroughly 
versed in its history, language, and traditions ; and he 
enjoyed his sojourn there ; he tells us that the five years he 
spent in Spain were the happiest in his existence. 

It must be remembered also that he was himself a man of 
unique and interesting personality— a personality which 
prominently pervades the whole book. He was a man of 
great strength and fearlessness ; a splendid rider ; as ac- 
complished a pugilist as he was a scholar ; and a man above 
all who loved humanity, who mixed by preference with the 
odd, the outcast, the degraded classes of society ; a man 
who kept his eyes open and took an interest in everything. 

We see from his book, too, that although a lover of Spain, 
he was none the less a patriot. England to him was first of 
all countries, and East Anglia the best part of England. 



6th Month, 
1899. 



JUNE— 30 days. 



nopK NOT roR 

illl'(.S.SlI!IT,ITlES. 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



New Jloon 8Ui, . 

First Quarter ICtli, . 

Fall Moon SSrcl, ., 

Last Quarter aotli, . 



20 inin. past 6 morning. 

46 min. past 9 morning. 

20 min. past 2 afternoon. 

45 min. past 4 morning. 





COMPARAISONS SONT ODIEUSES COM- 


RUX 


Woox 


6 


PARISONS ARE ODIOUS. 


&Sets 
3 51r 


&Sets 

'Rises 
A.M. 


<J 


1 


Th Corjms Christi. 


23 


2 


F 


"No Popery" Riots, 1780. 


8 6s 


41 


24 


•6 


S 


Duke of York born, 1865. 


3 49r 

8 8s 


1 
121 


25 


4 


1st ^unDaij after Crinit^. 


26 


5 


M 


4. Viscount Wolseley born, 1833. 


3 48r 


145 


27 


G 


Tu 


" Waste makes want." 


8 10s 


2 15 


28 


7 


VV 


First Reform Act, 1832. 


3 47r 


2 53 


29 


8 


'I'h 


Death of Maliomet, 632. 


8 12s 


Sets 
P.M. 


• 


9 


i*' 


Nero killed himself, 68. 


3 46r 


9 '^2 


1 


iOS 


Sir Edwin Arnold born, 1832. 


8 13s 
3 45r 


9 56 
10 21 


2 


11 


5? 


^ittr c^xtittraiJ after Critttt^. 


3 


li^ 


M 


" ne is rich that is satisfied:' 


8 15s 


10 42 


4 


13 


Tu 


Dr. Arnold born, 1795. 


3 4.5r 


11 


5 


U 


W 


13. Catalan!, Italian singer, died, 1819. 


8 16s 


11 16 


6 


15 


Th 


Fresh Water Close Season ends. 


3 44r 


1132 


7 


16 


F 


15. Mrs. H. Beecher Stowe born, 1812. 


8 17s 


1148 


D 


17S 


St. Alban, first English martyr. 


3 44r 

8 17s 


MorD. 

6 


9 


18 


5^ 


Sri ^xtntiau after Critttt^. 


10 


19 


M 


18. Battle of Waterloo, 1815. 


3 44r 


27 


11 


20 


Tu 


Accession of Queen Victoria, 1837. 


8 18s 


54 


12 


21 


W 


Proclamation Day.—Suvimer commences 


3 44r 


128 


13 


22 


Th 


Queen Victoria's Day, 1897. 


8 18s 


2 16 


14 


23 


F 


Battle of Plassey, 1757. 


3 45r 


nisfs 

P.M. 


O 


24 


S 


St. John Baptist.— Midsummer Bay. 


8 18g 
3 46r 


9 10 
9 41 


16 


25 


4tlj <§untraij after Sriniitj. 


17 


26 


M 


25. Kensington Museum opened, 1857. 


8 19s 


10 6 


IS 


27 


Tu 


" Frugality is an estate." 


3 46r 


10 28 


19 


28 


VV 


Coronation of Queen Victoria, 1838. 


S 19s 


10 47 


20 


29 


Th 


St. Peter, Apostle and Martyr. 


3 47r 


11 6 


21 


30 


i^^ 


Samuel Rogers, poet, born, 1763. 


8 18s 


1127 


C 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



Pitch niion the liest course 
of life and ciiscom will render 
it tlie most easy. 

Hicwfi" indulges in liberty of 
speech will hear things, in 
return, which he will not like. 

Leisure is a very pleasnnt 
garment to look at, but it is a 
very bad one to wear. 



Matches made in Heaven 
frequently tiu-n out as if tliey 
had bei-n matches made in the 
oclier place. 

"Pray to God," says Xeno- 
phon," at the beginning of 
thy works, that thou mayest 
bring tliem to a good con- 
clusion," 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 

" Tt is measures, vot men, tcewavt:" 
snouted the stump spealier. " It isn't 
avythivq of Vie Idnd " exclaimed an 
up-to-date girl, and she left the place. 

8.— Mohammed, when pursiicl by 
his enemies, ere his religion h^d 
gained a footing in the world, took 
refuge in a cave. To the mouth of 
tins ie:reat his pursuer.^ traced him ; 
l)Ut when thry were on the very 
point of cntciing, t! cir atieniion 
was arrested i.y h liulc bird darting 
from an adjoiuiiii,' thicket. 

Had it not been lor i his circum- 
stance, the most trisial that can 
well be conceived, which convinced 
them that here the fugitive could 
not be concealed, M(diainnied would 
have been discovered, and lie and 
his doctrines would li:ivo perished 
together. As it was, lie ctfecteJ 
his escape, gained the protection of 
his friends, and, by a most artful 
course of conduct, succeeded in 
laying the foundation of a religion 
winch now prevails over a large 
portion of the world. 

ff.— Seneca, observing one day 
that Nero was ready to sacrifice 
many persons on the bare suspicion 
of treason, boldly said to hiin. "No 
matter how many persons you may 
de.itro.v, you cannot destroy your 
successor." 

13,— Catalani's husband, a hand- 
some )''rciicliman, was even more 
unuitellectual than his wife — he 
was stupid. 

Once, having found the pitch of 
the piano too high, she said, after a 
rehearsal to her husband — -"I'li • 
piano is too high ; will you see that 
It is made lower before the con- 
cert?" 

When the evening came, Catalan! 
was annoyed to find that the piano 
had not he n altered. 



'■■lud sent for the car- 
declared that he had 
I'o inches from each leg, 
een ordered to do. 
t can't he too high now, 
said the husband, scoth- 



U. r I. us 
pciitcr, wl: 
sawn ciff t\ 
as he had I 

"Suiely 
my dear!" 
ingly. 

14.— In the third week of every 
June, the town of Buxton, in 
Derbyshire, holds high holiday. 
'J he springs and foiintaius are 
decorated Avith hoards of quaint 
and tasteful designs, in which 
howers are lavishly used. Banners, 
flags, and triun ihal a-chcs adorn 
the streets, wiiile hands of music 
ciili\-en the town, and many old 
Kiiglish sports are revived for the 
time. 

This period of niirthfulness is a 
survival of the ancient custom of 
dressing once a year the mineral 
and other wells for which Buxton 
is famous. 

15.— ^Irs. Beecher Stowe came of 
a famous NewEiigland family which 
has bctn settled in Conneci icut for 
two centuries, and which has pro- 
duced several famous divines, in- 
cluding her late brother, the Rev. 
Henry Ward Beecher. 

On the completion of l;er educa- 
tion she joined her sister Catherine 
at her school in Hartford, Connec;i- 
cut— first as pupil and aftei wards as 
teacher. There she remained until 



tbe appointment of their father to 
the presiiiency of Lane Theological 
Seminary at Cincinnati, Ohio, ad- 
i'linin.!,' the slavestate of Kentncl<y. 
Hf-re Harriet saw much of the 
jiracticil workings of the insti n- 
tion of slavery, and beciiue ac- 
quainted with the sc ■IK'S and 
incidents she afterwards so graphi- 
cally described in her anti-slavery 
writings. 

She niarriod in 1838 the Rev. 0. B. 
Stowe, a theological professor at 
Lane Seminary. Her liiSD work 
was a series of sketches of the 
descendants of the Pilgrim Father.-:. 
Two years Jater "Uncle Tom's 
Cabin" was contributi d as a serial 
to an anti-slavery newsiiaper. 

It fell in wiih the niodd of the 
time, and speedily atta ned a cir- 
culation which has rarely been 
equalled. More thanamilliou copies 
have Ijsen pr nted in English, while 
it has been translated into juany 
-foreign languages. 

After this early success Mrs. 
Beecher Stowe wrote numerous 
stories but thonsh none of them 
could becalledmediocn-jthey failed 
to take a hold on the public. 

IS.— We liave heard of a military 
poet— liiinself owning the title of 
lieutenant to a foot rc,u:iment— who, 
in writin.g some verseson Waterloo, 
conveyed one of his reminiscences 
of the battle in the following 
heraldic couplet :— 
'"^Yt'p forth. Liaitennnt Cobden, of 
ller Majesty's hundred ennl gecnnd 
foot— step fortJi unto thefrmit' 

Cried Major- General Sir Ilussei/ 
Vivian, K.C.D. — 'and hear the 
battle's brunt/'" 

29. — Since the days of the 
Apostles the head of tne Catholic 
Church has never either retainolor 
assumed the name of Peter. The 
oei-n pants of the Papal chair have 
always felt that it would 1)0 pre- 
sumption to have oneself styled 
Peter the second. 

30.— The poet Rogers was afflicted 
witn a notably unpleasant, c .daver- 
ouscountenance, which, with all his 
Intellectual power, " as a mortiHca- 
tion to him. To h de his annoyance 
he joked about his ugliness inces- 
saiuly,.%nd ueceivrdhis friends into 
suppo ing him iudilferent to it. He 
once turned to Sydney Smith, who, 
with Byrou and !\roi)i-e, was diuiu ; 
with him, and said — 

"Chantrey wants to perpetuate 
this niisei-al)le face of mine. What 
pose would you siiggCrt that I 
should take ?" 

"If you really wish to spare the 
world as much as jiossiiilc," sail 
the wit, " I would, if I were you, be 
taken at my prayers ; iny face 
buried in my hands." 

Rogers laughed with ihe other 
persons present, l)ut l:e shuc a 
maligprint glance at the ieste'-, and, 
it is said, never fully forgave him 
for the bon mot. 



A GOOD DOSE OF RHUBARB. 



A SENSIBLE GIRL'S REPLY TO 

MOORE'S 
" Our couch sheM be roses all spangled 

with deir." 
It would give me rheumatics, and so 
it -would 1,0 :i 

WAI/riili SAVAGE Landob. 



THE following bit of autobiography appecrs in a sketch of 
the late Yen. Archdeacoii Denison, who was born in 
1S05, and who died in 1891. 

When he was a young man, his mother gave him a 
medicine chest. "I had a gardener then," he says, "an 
old soldier, William Finlay. He came to me and said— 

" ' I'm b:td all over, inside and out, wants yon to give me 
some physic. They tells me you've got a medicine-chest, and 
a book as belongs to it." ' Well,' said I, ' I liave ; what will 
you take?' ' Some rhubarb,' said he. ' I'll look in the book,' 
I said, ' and see how much.' 

"Now the book has — I have it still with the chest— 
the book has at the beginning a table of doses, quite an 
inexcusable snare, I think, to simple peonle. It is con- 
structed on a hypothetical principle—' If to an adult a dram, 
so much to other ages.' The hypothetical part escaped me ; 
an adult one dram— a dram, that's 60 grains -magnesia to be 
added upon experience; how much'? I suppose half— 30 
grains— 90 grains in all. 

" It looked a great deal ; but I said to myself, ' Must be all 
right, here's the book ; Finlay's an adult.' He was over 
seventy. So I rang the bell. ' Here's your physic ; I liope it 
will put you all right.' ' I be to take all that ? ' ' Yes, that's 
just what the book says; small doses foolish things.' 'All 
right,' says he. Then I began to encourage hiii'i. 'Now 
Finlay, you're not veiy well ; don't try and do any work 
to-day; go home, keen yourself Avarm, and tell your wife to 
mix it up in some warm water— not too much water. You'll 
be much better in the morning. I should, if I were you, take 
it at once.' ' All right,' he said. 

" Poor man ! his coiitidence in me had no limits. I thought 
no more about it till next morning. My conscience was 
quite easy. I had done a wise and kind thing. 

"When I was dressing in the morning I looked out of the 
window. There was Finlay standing between me and the garden 
wall. He looked, so to speak, shadowy— almost ghostly. The 
wall, as it were, was visible through him. But, as it was 
daylight, I wasn't afraid. ' Hope you're better this morning ; 
glad to think you must be, or you would not have come up ' 
' Well,' he said, ' I be a trifle better.' ' Ah,' I said, ' I thouo-li't 
so. You took your physic, of course ? ' ' Why, didn't you tell 
me to take it? I'll tell you all about it. I goes home to my 
wife and says, "There, you mix that up; mind, not mucli 
water." " Lord's sake," she said, " you not be going to take all 
that'? Why, it would kill a horse and a cow !" " Yon foolish 
woman, hold your tongue ; go and do as I bids yon. Master's 
got a book and knows a sight more than you." So she goes 
and mixes it up in a slop-b.isin, and brings it back with a 
spoon standing up in the middle.' At this part of his report 
I began to have misgivings. He went on : 'I got him down, 
but it was a tough job, ami goes to bed.' I draw a veil over 
what followed. I struggled to look sympathetic, but mv 
misgivings increased. ' Well,' I said, as soon as I could 
steady my voice, 'go into the kitchen and have some nice 
warm breakfast, and then we'll see what is to be done next.' 

"Half an hour after I was on my way to Oxford as fast as I 
cottld go, and went to my dear friend Dr. Wootton. In the 
course of conversation I asked liint in a kind of careless way 
about I'hubarb, as a guide for my parochial practice. ' Well,' 
he said, ' it's a line medicine, and I give good doses of it'. 
'Yes; what is a good dose?' 'Eighteen grains is quite 
enough for anybody.' 'Eighteen grains,' I said. 'Why, I 
gave a man sixty yesterday and thirty magnesia.' He opened 
his great eyes, and said, 'Is lie very old?' 'Yes; over 
seventy. Then perhaps he won't die ! Go home as fast as 
you can and pour in porter and poit wine.'" And Finlay 
didn't die. He survived for many years his experience of the 
Archdeacon's medicine-chest. 



7th Month," 



JULY— 31 days. 



t HABIT BECOMES 
8EC0KD NATURK, 



THE MOON'S (CHANGES. 

New Moon 7th, 31 min. past 8 afternoon. 

First Quarter 15th, .... 59 min. past 11 afternoon. 

Full Moon 22ncl, 42 min. past 9 afternoon. 

Last Quarter 29th, 42 min. past afternoon. 



EONS MOTS N EPARGNENT NULS- 
SPARE NO ONE. 



-•WITTICISMS 



1|S 



Dominion Day {Canada). 



5tlj <§itttiiaiT after Crittit^. 

Dog Days legUi; end August 11th. 
Independence Day (U.S.A.). 
Dividends on Consols, etc., due. 
5. Rt. Hon. Cecil John Rhodes 1).,1S53. 
8. Rt. Hon. Joseph Chamberlain li., 1836. 
Midsiommer Fire Insurance ceases. 



etlr c^ittttiaiJ after l^riitttii. 

Capt. 3Iarryat, novelist, born, 1T92. 
Alexandria homharded, 1882. 
The Crimea evacuated, 1856. 
Treaty of Berlin signed, 1878. 
Madame de Stael died, 1817. 
St. Swithin's Day. 



7th ^ixntia^ after Crittitw. 

Franco-Prussian War commenced, 1870. 
Papal Infallibility proclaimed, 1870. 
Bishop Wilberforce died, 1873. 
Army Purchase abolished,1871. 
Robert Burns, poet, died, 1796. 
23. Duke of Devonshire born, 1833. 



Stij ^xttttia^j after i^rinttir, 

Rev. John Newton born, 1725. 
Rt. Hon. A. J. Balfour born, 1848. 
25. St. James, Apostle and Martyr. 
"Care and diligence bring liicJc" 
Pope Innocent VIII. died, 1492. 
William Wilberforce died, 1833. 



dth ^untra^ after ©ritttt^. 

"A good life keeps off wrinkles." 



Sun 
iRises 
.&Sets 


Moon 

Rises 
&Sets 


3 49r 


Rises 
A.M. 


8 17s 


Morn. 


3 50r 


17 


8 17s 


53 


a ij2r 


135 


8. 16s 


2 27 


3 54r 
8 14s 


Sels 
P.M. 

8 25 


3 55r 


8 48 


8 13s 


9 7 


3 57r 


9 24 


8 11s 


9 39 


4 Or 


9 55 


8 10s 


10 11 


4 2r 


10 30 


8 8s 


10 53 


4 4r 


1123 


8 5s 


Morn. 


4 7r 


2 


8 3s 


55 


4 9r 


2 4 


8 Is 


Rises 
P.M. 


4 12r 


8 7 


7 58s 


8 31 


415r 


8 52 


7 55s 


9 12 


418r 


9 32 


7 52s 


9 56 


4 2U- 


10 23 


7 49s 


10 53 


4 24r 


1134 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



Many a man's love is but 
gratified egotism ; many a 
•woman's love only the confirma- 
tion of ber vanity. 

NoTHiNO in the world can be 
more pleasing ttan a mind under 
the guidance of reason and 
conscience. 



Pkrfect valour is to do un- 
witnessed what we should be 
capable of doing before all the 
world. 

Crkats easily believe others 
as bad as themselves ; there is 
no deceiving them, nor do they 
long deceive. 



HOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 

Busy yourself not in looking forward 
to the events of to-morrow; but whatever 
may be those of the days Providence 
mat/ yet assign you, neglect not to turn 
them to advantage.~B.ouACE. 

3.— On this day in 1423 was born 
Louis XI. of Prance, of whom the 
following anecdote is told. He 
narrowly escaped death on paying a 
visit on one occasion to the Duke of 
Alen(jon. He was entering the 
Duke s castle at the head of his 
suite through the principal door, 
when a large stone, detached from 
the battlements by a page who hap- 
pened to be there playing witli a girl, 
fell immedwtely in front of bim. 

The tyrant saw that he had been 
within an inch of the grave; but, 
being unable to punish the youth 
for what he was compelled to con- 
sider an accident, he pretended to 
discover in it amiraculous interfer- 
ence of Providence, and taking up 
the stone with much appearance 
of piety, carried it in procession 
to Mount St. Michael, beyond 
Avranches. 

10.— "While at Windsor (U.S.)," 
says Captain Marryat, " I took cold 
and was laid up with a fever. I had 
been in bed three days, when my 
landlady came into the room. 

"' Well, captain, how do you And 
yourself by this time ? ' 

" ' Oh, I am a little better, thank 
yon,' replied I. 

" ' Well, I am glad of it, because I 
want to whitewash your room ; for 
if the colourman stops to do it till 
to-morrow, he'll be charging us 
another quarter of a dollar.' 

" ' But I am not able to leave my 
room.' 

•"Well, then, I'll speak to him; 
I dare say he won't mind your being 
in bed while he whitewashes.'" 

14.— A friend of M. de Talleyrand 
asked him one day in confidence how 

it was that Madame C . a very 

stupid person, could have held him 
in her chains. " Why the truth is," 
he replied, "that Madame de Stael 
has so woin me out with her clever- 
ness that I feel as if I could never 
have enough of stupidity." 

19.— Bishop Wilberforce relates 
that he was once in a railway carri- 
age with two of the well-informed, 
who were discussing himself. The 
Bishop listened with some amuse- 
ment to the dissection of his charac- 
ter, until one of the speakers 
remarked that it was well known 
that his wife and children were 
often obliged to hide in the corners 
of the house to escape his rage. 

At this point the Bishop mildly 
interposed, saying that he had 
known the Bishop of Oxford for a 
great many years, in fact since his 
infancy, and must assure the 
speakers that they were mi sinformed 
regarding his domestic life. 

The remark was rtceived with 
politely veiled incredulity, and as 
the bishop left the train hp over^ 
heard one of the travellers whisper 
to the other, "Oh,youknow,Wili)er- 
force's friends always stand up for 
him in that way." 

21.— A London merchant, called 
Peter Thellusson, who died on this 



•BE NOT solitary: BE NOT IDLE. 



day in 1797, made an extraordinary 
will, directing the income of his 
property to he accumulated during 
the lives of all his children, grand- 
children, and great grandchildren 
who were living at the time of his 
death. His ol)]ect was to benrflt 
very largely three future descen- 
dants who might be living at the 
death of the survivor of all these, 
and so to found a very wealthy 
family. He meant to convert his 
£600,000 in course of time into 
something like twenty-three 
millions. 

The result of these trusts being 
upheld by the Courts was to create 
a mania for accumulations. One 
man gave instructions for a will 
which should postpone all enjoy- 
ment of his property until the denth 
of the last survivor of all the 
members of the peerage living at 
his death. 

To prevent the repetition of these 
absurdities, Thellusson's Act was 
passed, which in effect forbids tlie 
accumulation of income for a longer 
period than the settler's life or 
twenty-one years from his death, 
or the minority of any person living 
at his death, or of any person wlio 
would under the settlement be 
otherwise entitled to the income, 

Even so, however, the beneficial 
enjoyment of property may be post- 
poned for a very long time. 

25.— Coleridge, the poet, died on 
this day in 1834. 

Almost all the great men of his 
day who had personal acquaintance 
with Coleridge speak of him in a 
strain of admiration. "I think," 
says Dr. Arnold, " that, with all his 
faults, old Sam was more of a great 
man than any one who has lived 
within the four seas in my memory." 
Walter Savage Landor gave it as 
iliis opinion that, since Shakespeare, 
MSlilton. and Bacon, "we have had 
, nothing comparable with him." 
Wordsworth said that he had 
" seen men who had done wonderful 
things, but only one wonderful man 
—namely, Coleridge." 

Longfellow possessed Coleridge's 
own copy of the first edition of the 
"Slbyllme Leaves," with notes in 
the author's handwriting. In " The 
Ancient Mariner," after the stanza 
" The naked hulk alongside came," 
was printed another stanza— 
" A gust of ivind sterte up behind, 
And whistled through his bones ; 
Through the holes of liis eyes and 
the hole of his mouth. 
Half whistles and half groans." 

These verses were marked by 
ColSridge " To be struck out." 

29. -The " Good Wilberforce," as 
he was commonly called, was also 
known as the "Nightingale of the 
House of Commons," on account of 
his sweet voice and persuasive 
.eloquence. No fewer than forty 
members were influenced by his 
speech in Lord Melville's prosecu- 
tion. 

" To spend, or to lend, or to give in, 
'Tis a very good world that we live 

in; 
But to borrow, or beg, or get one's 

own, 
'Tis the very worst world that ever 

was known." 



THE FIRST STEP TO FAME AND 
FORTUNE. 



A REMARKABLE violin virtuoso was Ole Bull, the 
Norwegian, whose death in 1880 was deplored as a 
national loss. In the main he was a self-taught player. 
His individuality was so strangely marlced as to leave but 
little room for the direct influence of a teacher. He was him- 
self a true son of the North, of athletic build and independent 
character ; and the ruling passion of his life was the love he 
bore to his native land. "The glorious scenery," says one 
writer, "of the mountains and fjords of his home, tlie weird 
poetry of the Sagas of the North, took hold of his sensitive 
mind from early childhood and filled his Imagination. They 
were reflected in his style of playing and gave it that origin- 
ality and poetic charm by which he never failed to captivate 
his audience." 

An ever-to-be-remembered incident in the life of this 
"flaxen-haired Paganinl," as he was often called, is the 
following. We give it as it is described by the famous Danish 
writer, Hans Christian Andersen, of fairy-tale fame. 

Behind the Alps is the land of miracles, the world of 
adventure. We do not believe in miracles ; adventure, on the 
contrary, is very dear to us— we listen to it with willingness, 
and such a one as only happens to genius took place in 
Bologna in the year 1834. 

The poor Norseman, Ole Bull, whom at that time no one knew, 
had wandered thus far southward. In his fatherland some per- 
sons certainly thought that there was something in him ; but 
most people, as is generally the case, predicted that Ole Bull 
would amount to nothing. He himself felt that he must go 
out into the world in order to cherish the spark into a flame, 
or else to quench it entirely. Everything seemed at first to 
indicate that the latter would be the case. He had arrived 
at Bologna, but his money was spent, and there was no place 
where tliere was any prospect of getting more— no friend, 
not a countryman, held forth a helping hand towards him ; 
he sat alone in a poor attic in one of the small streets. 

It was already the second day tliat he had been here, and 
he had scarcely tasted food. The water-jug and the violin 
were the only two things that cheered the young and suffer- 
ing artist. He began to doubt whether he really were in 
possession of that talent with which God had endowed him, 
and in his despondency breathed into the violin those tones 
which have seized our hearts in so wonderful a manner— tliose 
tones which have told us how deeply he had suffered and 
felt. 

The same evening a great concert was to be given in the 
principal theatre. The house was filled to overflowing ; the 
Grand Duke of Tuscany was in the royal box ; Madame 
Malibran and Monsieur de Beriot were to lend their able 
assistance in the performance of several pieces. The concert 
was to commence, but matters looked inauspicious — the 
manager's star was not in tlie ascendant— Monsieur de Beriot 
had taken umbrage and refused to play. 

All was trouble and confusion on the stage, when, in this 
dilemma, the wife of Rossini, the composer, entered, and in 
the midst of the manager's distress related that on the 
previous evening, as she passed through one of the narrow 
streets, she had suddenly stopped on hearing the strange 
tones of an instrument, which certainly resembled those of 
a violin, but yet seemed to be different. She had asked the 
landlord of the house who it was who lived in the attic 
whence the sounds proceeded, and he had replied that it was 
a young man from the north of Europe, and that the instru- 
ment he played was certainly a lyre, but she felt sure that it 
could not be so ; it must either be a new sort of an instrument 
or an artist who knew how to treat his instrument in an un- 
usual manner. At the same time she said they ought to send 



Sth Month,"! 
1899. J 



AUGUST— 31 days. 



TIME TRIES ALL. 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 

New Moon Gth, 48 min. past 11 morning. 

First Quarter 14th, .... 54 min. past 11 morning. 

Full Moon 21st, .... 45 min. past 4 morning. 

Last Quarter 27th, .... 57 min. past 11 afternoon. 



CHOSE PERDUE, CHOSE CONNUE A THING 

LOST IS A THING KNOWN. 



Lammas Day : Scottish Q\iarter Day. 
1. rarcel post comiuenced 1SS3. 
Viscount Peel born, 1S29. 

" 'Tis deeds must win the prize." 
6. Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gothab., '44. 



lOtlj ^imtra:H aft. f^rittitir. 

Bank Holiday. 

''Sloth is the mother of poverty." 
Heligoland ceded to Germany, 1890. 
Rt. Hon. G. J. Goschen born, 1831. 
12. Grouse Shooting begins. 
Trinity Law Sittings end. 



lltlr ^itntrau aft. ©rinit^. 

Rev. Rowland Hill born, 1744. 
Sir Walter Scott born, 1771. 
15. Eev. Edward Irving born, 1792. 
Frederick the Great died, 1786. 
Emperor of Austria born, 1830. 
" Men should be what they seem." 



nth ^unU)j aft. tnitxt;!. 

Blackcock Shooting begins. 

" Handsome is that handsome does." 

Louis XVI. of France born, 1754. 
St Bartholomew. Huguenot massacre, 

[1572. 
Alexander Nasmyth, Scotch artist, bdrn 

[1758. 
Louis Philippe died, 1850. 



IStlj ^untiaii aft. Crinttj. 

29. Sir Rowland Hill died, 1879. 
Oliver Wendell Holmes born, 1809. 
Battle of Plevna, 1877. 
John Bunyan died, 1688. 



Sax 
Rises 
fcSets 


Moon 
Rises 
&Sets 


8) 

< 


4 25r 

7 Us 


Rises 

A.M. 

23 


25 
26 


4 23r 


1 20 


27 


7 41s 


2 22 


28 


4 31r 


3 28 


29 


7 3S3 


Sets 
P.M. 


® 


4 31r 


7 31 


1 


7 34s 


7 47 


2 


4 37r 


8 3 


3 


7 30s 


8 19 


4 


4 40r 


8 36 


5 


7 26s 


8 57 


6 


4 44r 


9 23 


7 


7 23s 


9 59 


D 


4 47r 


10 43 


9 


7 19s 


1142 


10 


4 50r 


Morn. 


11 


715s 


55 


12 


4 53r 


2 19 


13 


711s 


3 47 


14 


4 57r 


JUses 

j:m. 


O 


7 6s 


7 14 


16 


5 Or 


7 36 


17 


7 2s 


7 58 


18 


5 2r 


8 24 


19 


6 58s 


8 55 


20 


5 6r 


9 34 


C 


6 54s 


10 20 


22 


5 9r 


11 15 


23 


6 49s 


Morn. 


24 


5 12r 


15 


25 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



Thetib are peculiar ways in 
men, which discover what they 
are througli the most subtle 
feints and closest disguises. 

To 1)6 f i-ee-ininded and cheer- 
fully disposed at hours of meat, 
sleep and exercise is one of the 
best precepts of long la? ;iiig. 



Hr who wants good sense ia 
unhappy in having learning ; 
for lie has clie.'cby more ways 
of exp ising himself. 

KooLS line the hedges which 
Ih.uii I I ho road of life— what 
can the wise man do but smile 
as he passes along it. 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 



Agent : ' Here's n ciiclmneter I can 
r. commend. It is positively accurate 
—not at all Wee some cyclometers, 
ivhi.-h register tw > miies, perhaps, 
when you have only Hdden one." 

Young Lady: ''Have you any of 
that kind left?" 

'i-^.—n was the Rev. Rowland 
, J f IJ^bit to ride to chapel in aa 
old family carriage, a practice too 
aristocratic in the judgment of one 
of his flock, who detennined to re- 
buke it. 

It was customary in his chapel for 
notes to be gent to the puljiic, re- 
questing praj'ers for various ob- 
]ects,and one Sabliath Mr.Hill was 
proceeding with the rending of the^e 
requests as usnal, when he found 
himself in the midst of one of the 
following purport :— " Piayers are 
requestedfor the Rev. Mr. Hill, that 
he may be more humlde and like his 
Divme Master, who, instead of rid- 
ing in a carriage, was content to be 
borne on an ass." 

Having read the notice, he lifted 
his spectacles to his forehead, and 
looking round the chapel, observed 
that it was quite true he ha<i been 
guilty of the fault alle,'cd; but if 
the writer would step round to the 
vestry door after service, saddled 
and bridled, hi- would have no ob- 
jection to ride home, after his 
Master's example, on the hack of 
an ass. 

15.— The Rev. Kdward Irving as 
minister of the Scottish Church in 
Lend ;n, made a great deal of talk 
in his day. He was at lirst liighlv 
popular. He h.ad sat at the feet of 
Coleridge and imbibed his transcen- 
dental philosoiiliy. At length he 
lapsed into doeirin.-il crroi-s, accord- 
ing to the standards of thr Church 
—believed in the miraculous gift 
of tongues— the reappearance of the 
day of Pentecost— and was deposed 
from the ministry in 1S33. He died 
the following year, aged forty- 
thiee. 

He was the author of several dis- 
conrs 8 on the prophecies, two 
volumes of Sermous, and Four Or^i- 
tioni on the judg i.ent to coiv.e. 
Coleridge said of ihcse writings of 
Irving:— •'Sometimes he has five 
or six pages together of the purest 
eloquence, and then an outb:eak of 
almost madman's gabble." 

Thomas Carl.vie was one of irv- 
ing's early friend -s-Miss Welsh, 
who became Mrs. Carlyle, was, as is 
well known, at one time passion- 
ately in love with Irving, and he 
with her. After Irving's death, we 
find Carlyle thus writing of him :— 

" The first time 1 saw Irving was 
six-and-twenty years ago, in his 
native town, Annan. He was in sh 
from Edinburgh, with college 
prizes, high character, and promise : 
he had come to see our school- 
master, who had also been his. We 
heard of famed professors, of high 
matters classical, mathematical— a 
whole wonderland of knowledge: 
nothing but joy, health, hopefulness 
without end looked out from the 
blooming young man. The Inst 
time I saw him was three ninnths 
ago, in London. Frieiidliiicso still 



YOU MAY KNOW THE MASTEB BY THE MAN.' 



beamed in bis eyes, but now from 
amid unauiet Are; bis face was 
flaccid, wasted, unsound ; hoary as 
with extreme age: he was trerab- 
lin,!,' over the lu-ink of the grave. 
Adieu, tliou first friend — adieu 
while tliis confused twilight of 
ex-istenco lasts! Might we meet 
wl:ere twilight lias become day 1 " 

25. — Alexander Kasmyth, the 
landscape raintrr, was a man fruit- 
ful in expedients. The Duke of 
AthdU consu'ted him as to some 
iniproveiiicnrs which he desired to 
niHlce in his woodland scenery near 
Dunkild. Among other things a 
ceitiiin rocky crag needed to be 
)'linted with trees, to relieve the 
grim barrenness of its appeai'ance. 

The question was how to do ir,as 
it \v:is impossil>lc for any man to 
climb the crag in order to set seeds 
or plants in ilic clefts of the rock. 

A happy idea occurred to Nasmyth. 
Having observed in front of the 
castle a pair of small cannon, it 
occurred to biiii to turn them to 
acconnr. A nnmber of tin canisters 
were tilled with nil sorts of suitable 
tree seeds. The cannon were loaded, 
and the canisters were llred against 
the high face of the rock. They 
burst, and scattered the seed in all 
directions. 

Some years after Nasmyth was 
delighted to find that this scheme 
of iilanting by artillery had proved 
successiul ; the ti ees were flourish- 
ing in all the recesses of the clilf. 

29. — The late Oliver "Wendell 
Holmes once said that bis idea of 
perfect happiness was when four 
feet were on i lie fender. 

During the later part of his life, 
a friend, coming in and finding him 
in a dejected state of mind, asked, 
" What is the matter, my friend?" 

Blr. lldlmes looked up with a look 
of sorrow, and said, "Don't you 
see ? There are only two feet on 
the fender now." 

How much of the happmess of 
the marriage relation is suggested 
by bis idea, so tiiucliingly expressed, 
and the pathos of the aftertimc? 
It seems startling to think how 
much may be lerliaps unlicedmgly 
done by ourselves to destroy our 
fl reside happiness. 

31. John Bunyan, the famous 
auth<u- of the " Pilgrim's Progress." 
was a prisoner in the gaol (jf Bed- 
ford, with intervals of iiiecarious 
lib/riy, for twelveyears. He refused 
to be"set at birgc on the cnnditinn 
of 1 reaching no more. "No," was 
his brave an-wtr, "if you let me 
out to-day I'll preach again to- 
morrow." 

A few months before the Revo- 
lution of 1G83 lie caught a fever in 
consequence of a long ride from 
Reading to l.onloa in the rain. He 
died at the lioi'.seof his friend Mr. 
Si:riidwick,agro-er at the sign of 
the Star, on Snow Hill, London. He 
was buried in Bunhill Fields, called 
by the poet Sonthey tbe"Campo 
Santo of Dissenters." 



"Still seems it strange that thou 

shoiudst live for ever f 
Is it less siranye that thou shouldst 

live at all f 
This is a Miracle; and that no 

i»oj-e."— YOUKG. 



for him, and he might, perhaps, supply the place of Monsieur 
de Beriot by playing the jneces tliat must otherwise be want- 
ing in the evening's entertainment. 

This advice was acted upon, and a messenger was despatched 
to the street where Ole Bull sat in his attic. To him it was 
a message from heaven. Now or never, thought he, and, 
though ill and exhausted, he took his violin uuder his arm 
and accompanied the messenger to the theati'e. 

Two niinutes after his arrival the manager informed the 
assembled audience that a young Norwegian, consequently a 
"young savage," would give a specimen of his skill on the 
violin instead of Monsieur de Beriot. 

Ole Bull appeared. 1'lie theatre was brilliantly illum.inated. 
He perceived the scrutinising looks of the ladies nearest to 
liim ; one of them, who watclied him very closely through her 
opera-glass, smilingly wliisiiered to her neighbour, with a 
mocking mien, about the diffident manners of the artist. He 
looked at his clothes, and in the strong blaze of light they 
looked rather the worse for wear. The lady made her 
remarks about them, and her smile pierced his very heart. 

He had taken no notes with him which he could give to the 
orchestra ; he v/as consequently obliged to play without any 
accompaniment. But what should he play? "I will give 
them the fantasies wliich at this moment cross my mind ! " 
And he played improvisatorily remembrances of his own life 
— melodies from his soul. It was as if every thought, every 
feeling, passed through the violin and revealed itself to the 
audience. 

The most astounding acclamations resounded through the 
house. Ole Bull was called forth again and again. They still 
desired a new improvisation. He then addressed himself to that 
lady wdiose mocking smile had met him on his appearance, 
and asked for a theme to vary. She gave him one from 
" Norma." He then asked two other ladies, who chose one 
from "Othello" and one from "Moses." Now, thought he, 
if I take all three, unite them with each other, and form one 
piece, I shall then flatter each of the ladies, and perhaps the 
composition will produce an elfect. 

He did so. Powerfully as the rod of the magician the bow 
glided across the strings, while cold drops of perspiiation 
trickled down his forehead. There was fever in his blood ; 
it was as if the mind would free itself from the body; lire 
shot from his eyes; he felt himself almost swooning; yet a 
few bold strokes— they were his last bodily powers. 

Flowers and wreaths from Ihe charmed multitude fluttered 
about him, who, exhausted by mental conflict and liunger, 
was neai'ly fainting. He went to his homo accompanied by 
music. Before tlie house sounded the serenade for the hero 
of the evening, who meanwhile crept up the dark and narrow 
staircase, higher and higlier, into his poor garret, where he 
clutched the water-jug to refresh himself. When all was 
silent the landlord came to him, brought him food atid drink, 
and gave him a better room. Tlie next day he was informed 
that the theatre was at his service, and that a concert was to 
be arranged for him. An invitation from the Duke of Tuscany 
next followed, and from tliat moment name and fame were 
founded for Ole Bull. 



PROVERBS FROM CROATIA. 

It is better to die honestly than, to live shamefully. 

It is good to know everything hut not to do evenjthing. 

Where the big bells ring the little ones are not heard. 

The sun goes through dirty places but does not soil itself. 

When the cat is not at home the mice are the "landlords." 

It is better to weep with a wise man than to laugh with a 
foolish one. 

It is better to have one ounce of understanding than a hun- 
dred pounds of strength. 

The tongue can cut worse than a saw. 

Who m summer plays will in winter hunger. 



9th Months 
1899. J 



SEPTEMBER— 30 days. 



OLD Y UNG 
AND OLD LONG 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 

New Moon 5th, 33 min. past 3 morning. 

First Quarter 12th, 49 min. past 9 afternoon. 

FuU Moon 19th, .... 31 min. past afternoon. 

Last Quarter 26th, 3 min. past 3 afternoon. 



ENVIE PASSE AVARICE ENVY GOES BEYOND 

AVARICE. 



llF 
2S 



St. Giles. Partridge Sliooting begins. 
Great Fire of London began, 1606. 



14tlT .^itttt^a^ aft. i^rittit^. 

5. Louis XIV. of France born, 1638. 
The year 5660 of the Jewish era commences. 

"Absence of occupation is not rest." 
Queen Elizabeth born, 1533. 
Ariosto, Italian poet, born, 1474, 
Battle of Flodden, 1513. 



Sun 
Rises 
&Sets 



15t$ ^untra^ aft. l^rinit^. 

MungoPar]5:,African traveller, b., 1771. 

" They laugh that win." 
Capture of Quebec: Death of General 
Wolfe, 1759. 

Duke of Wellington died, 1852. 
16. P. 0. Savings Bank inst., 1861 
George I. landed in England, 1714. 



16tlj <^«tttJa;j aft. l^nttitir 

Dr. Samuel Johnson born, 1709. 
Lord Brougham born, 1779. 
Battle of the Alma, 1854. 
Sir Walter Scott died, 1832. 

" Avoid excess in anything." 
Autumn commences. 



SOS 



irtlj ^untra^ aft. fcititj. 

Siege of Paris commenced, 1870. 

25. Butler, author of "Hudibras," d., leso. 

" Man proposes, God disposes." 
Louis Pasteur died, 1895. 
St. Michael—Michaelmas Day. 
Lord Koberts, V.C., born, 1832. 



5 14r 

6 43s 

5 17r 

6 38s 

5 20r 

6 34s 

5 23r 

6 29s 

5 27r 

6 24s 

5 30r 

6 20s 

5 33r 

6 15s 

5 36r 

6 11s 
5 39r 
6 

5 43r 

6 Is 
5 46r 
5 57s 
5 49r 
5 52s 
5 52r 
5 48s 
5 56r 
5 43s 
5 59r 
5 39s 



Moon 

Rises 
&Sets 



Rises 
A.M. 

2 27 

3 33 

4 41 

Sets 
P.M. 

6 27 

6 45 

7 4 

7 29 

8 

8 40 

9 32 
10 37 
1154 

Morn. 

1 16 

2 43 

4 10 

Bises 
P.M. 

5 59 

6 23 
6 54 

7 31 

8 15 

9 7 
10 7 

nil 

Morn. 

17 
123 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



"What is becoming is honest, 
aud whatever is honest must 
always be becoming. 

Men are never such heroes, 
or such fools, as in the presence 
of women. 

. Ip you have received an 
injury from anyone, wash it 
out, not in blood, but in the 
waters of Lethe. 



OUB happiness in this world 
depends on the affections we 
are enabled to inspire. 

It is always the individual. 
not the age, that stands up for 
the truth. 

To do good to our enemies is 
to resemble the incense whose 
uroma perfumes the fire by 
which it is consumed. 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 

The man who always does his best, 
will find a steady demand for the 
things that he can do. 

1.— Notwithstanding the fact that 
September is the harvest month, we 
find six evil days set down in one 
old calendar and two in another. 

Both calendars are agreed that 
the sixth and seventh are dangerous 
days on which to undertake any- 
thing The other unlucky days are 
the third, fourth, twenty-flrst and 
twenty-second. 

Yet, despite these unpropitious 
days spread over two-thirds of the 
month, an ancient poet was found 
ready to sing— 
"In tyme of harvest mery it is 

ynough; 
Peres add apples hangen on bough ; 
The hayward bloweth mery home, 
In every felde ripe is corn ; 
The grapes hangen on the vyne ; 
Swete is treue love of fyne." 

September boasts very little 
weather - lore, though one would 
have expected to find plenty placed 
to its credit. It, however, "dries 
up ditches or breaks down hedges," 
and it is thus invoked— 
'^ September blow soft, 
Till the corn's in the loft." 

5.— A nolileman of the Court of 
France, taking leave of Louis XIV., 
who was sending him as ambassador 
to anotiier sovereign, the monarch 
said to him, " Tlie chief direction I 
have to give to you is to pursue a 
course of conduct entirely different 
from tliat of your predecessor." 

"SiiT," replied the new ambas- 
sador, " I trust that I shall act so 
that your majesty will not have to 
give similar instructions to my 
successor." 

11„— Sir Walter Scott, walking 
one day along the banks of the 
Yarrow, where Mungo Park was 
born, saw the traveller throwing 
stones into the water, and anxiously 
watching the bubbles that suc- 
ceeded. 

Scott inquired the object of his 
occupation. "I was thinking," 
answered Park, "how often I had 
thus tried to sound the rivers in 
Africa by calculating how long a 
time had elapsed before the bubbles 
rose to the surface." 

It was a slight circumstance, but 
the traveller's safety frequently 
depended upon it. 

18.— A lady desired Dr. Johnson 
to give his opinion of a work she 
had just written; adding that, if it 
would not do, she begged him to 
tell her, for she had other irojis in 
the fire; and in case of it not being 
likely to succeed, she could bring 
out something else. 

"Tlien," said the doctor, after 
turning over a few leaves, " I advise 
you, madam, to put it where your 
other irons are." 

20.— The famous battle of the 
Alma was fought between the 
English, French, and Turkish army 
on the one side, aud the Russians 
on the other. The allies numbered 
about 57,000 men, the Russians 
al)out 46,000. 

The battle began about mid-day. 



and by four o'clock, after a san- 
guinary .flRht, the allies were com- 
pletely victorious. The enemy, 
utterly routed, threw away their 
arms and knapsacks in their flight, 
having lost about 5,C00 men, of whom 
900 were made prisoners, mostly 
wounded. 

The loss of the British was 26 
officers and 327 men killed, and 73 
officers and 1,539 men wounded 
(chiefly from the 23rd, 7th, and 33rd 
regiments) ; thai, of the French. 
3 officers and 233 men killed, and 
54 officers and 1,033 men wounded. 
Total loss of allii s. about 3,203. 

25.— Butler's famous poeni of 
lludibras is a poem of considerable 
length— over ten thousand verses— 
but Hazlitt is bold enough to say 
that " half the lines are got by 
heart." This i> rather an exaggera- 
tion, but it is certainly a fact that 
diligent students of later English 
literature have read a great part of 
Hadibras thouf^li they may never 
have opened its pages. 

As examples of lines, some wise, 
some witiy, and some absurd, that 
have passed into general circula- 
tion, let us take the following :— 

" Great conquerors greater glory gain 
Bu foes in ti iumph led than slain. 

* * * * 
Valour's a mouse-trap, ivit a gin. 
Which women oft are taken in. 

* * * * 
Ally me ! whatperils do environ 

The man that meddles with cold iron. 



Rhyme the rudder is of verses. 
With which, like ships, they steer their 
courses. 

* * * * 
I am not now in fortune's power ; 
He that is down can fall no lower. 

* * * * 
Ee understood the speech of birds 
As well as they themselves do words. 

* * * * 

'Tis known he could speak Greek, 

As naturally as pigs squeak. 

* * * * 
In all the trade of war no feat 
Is nobler than a brave retreat ; 
For those that run away and fly, 
Take place at least o' th' enemy. 

« « » » 

Those that write in rhyme still make 
The one verse for the other's sake ; 
For one for sense, and one for rhyme, 
I think 's sufficient for one time." 

29> Michaelmas Day, or, to give 
it Its full title, the day of St, 
Michael and All Angels, is a great 
festival of the Church of Rome and 
a feast observed by the Church of 
England. There is a widely pre- 
valent custom of marking the day 
with a goose at dinner. It was a 
superstition that to eat goose at 
Michaelmas was to make certain of 
easy circumstances for the ensuing 
year. 



In men we various ruling passions 

find, 
In women two almost divide the kind : 
Those onlyflx'd, they first or last obey. 
The love of pleasure and the JLove of 

sway. 

Pope. 



A CASE OF CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE. 



XN the early part of this century the green of a rich bleacher 
in the north of Ireland had been frequently robbed at 
night to a very considerable amount, notwithstanding 
the utmost vigilance of the proprietor and his servants to pro- 
tect it, and without the slightest clue being furnished for the 
detection of the robber. 

ElTectually and repeatedly baffled by the ingenuity of the 
thief or thieves, the proprietor at length offered a reward of 
£100 for the apprehension of any person or persons detected 
robbing the green. 

A few days after this proclamation, the master was at mid- 
night raised from his bed by the alarm of a faithful servant, 
" there was somebody with a lantern crossing the green." The 
master started from his bed and flew to the window — it was 
so : he hurried on his clothes, and armed himself with a pistol ; 
the servant flew for his loaded musket, and they cautiously 
followed the light. The person with the lantern (a man) was, 
as they approached, on tip-toe, distinctly seen stooping and 
groping on the ground ; he was seen lifting and tumbling the 
linen. The servant fired ; the robber fell. 

The man and master now proceeded to examine the spot. 
The robber was dead ; he was recognised to be a youth about 
nineteen, who resided a few fields off. The linen was cut 
across ; bundles of it were tied up ; and upon searching and 
examining farther, tlie servant. In the presence of his master, 
picked up a penknife, with the name of the unhappy youth 
engraved upon the handle. 

Tlie evidence was conclusive, for in the morning the lantern 
was acknowledged by the afflicted and implicated father of 
the boy to be his lantern. Defence was dumb. 

The faithful servant received the hundred pounds reward, 
and was besides promoted to be the confidential overseer of 
the establishment. 

This faithful servant, this confidential overseer, was shortly 
after proved to have been himself the thief, and was hanged 
at Dundalk for the murder of the youth whom he had cruelly 
betrayed. 

It appeared, upon the clearest evidence, and by the dying 
confession and description of the wretch himself, that all 
this circumstantial evidence was preconcerted by him, not 
only to screen himself from the imputation of former robberies, 
but to get the hundred poimds reward. 

The dupe, the victini he chose for this diabolical purpose, 
was artless, affectionate, and obliging. The boy had a 
favourite knife, a penknife with his name engraved upon the 
handle, and the first act of the real robber was to coax the 
boy to give him that knife as a keepsake. 

On the evening of the fatal day he prepared tlie bleaching 
green to give evidence against the boy. He tore the linen 
from the pegs in some places, he cut it across in others ; he 
turned it up in heaps ; he tied it up in bundles as if ready to 
be removed, and placed the knife he had received in one of 
the cuts he had himself made. 

Matters being thus arranged, he invited the devoted youth 
to supper, and as the night was dark, he told him to bring 
the lantern to light him home. At supper, or after, he art- 
fully turned the conversation upon the favourite knife, which 
he afi"ected with great concern to miss, and pretending that 
the last recollection he had of it was using it on a particular 
spot of the bleaching green, described the spot to the obliging 
boy and begged him to see if it was there. He lit the lantern 
he had been desired to bring with him to light him home, and 
with alacrity proceeded upon his fatal errand. 

As soon as the man saw his victim was completely in the 
snare, he gave the alarm, and the melancholy crime already 
described was the result. 

Could there have been possible a stronger case of circum- 
stantial evidence than this ? 



loth Month, 1 
1899. J 



OOTOBER— 31 days. 



TlIK 



WHO IS GOJU 
18 HArPT. 



CHANGES. 

14 mill, past 7 afternoon. 



THE MOON'S 

Kow Moon 4tli,... 

First Quarter 12th, 10 miu. past 6 niorniu: 

Full Moon 18th 5 min. past 10 afternoon 

Last Quarter 26th, 40 min. past morning. 



FORCE N A PAS DROIT — 

RIO in 



-MIGHT KNOWS KO 



lis 

2M 

3jTu 

4W 

5Tli 

6'f 

7iS 



12 Th 

13F 

US 



15 
16 


M 


17 


Tu 


18 


W 


19 


Til 


20 


F 


21 


S 



22 ^ 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 



IStlj ^untraij aft. feitit^. 

J'Tieasant Shooting begins. 

Treaty of Limerick, 1G91. 

" Many women maraj ivords." 

Dividends on Consols, dec., due. 

W. H. Smith died, iS91. ,,. , .^. 

' [died, 029. 

Charles II. of France "the Simple" 



19tlT ^xtniraii aft. Sriititir. 

St. Denys, Patron Saint of France. 
Henry Cavendish, chemist., b., 1731. 
Edward Colston (Bristol) died, 1721. 

" Siceet is pleasure after pain." 
14. Sir W. V. Harcourt born, 1827. 
Michaelmas Fire Insurance ceases. 



mij .^uittraiT aft. t^rmit^. 

John Hunter, anatomist, d., 1793. 
Pope John YII. died, 707. 

St. Luke, Evangelist. 

"lie is oft Vae ?ri.'erf man 
ll/io is not vise at all." 

George Colman the younger b., 17G2 



21st ^itittiau aft. tettitn. 

Lord Jeffery, eminent critic, b., 1773. 
Michaelmas Law Sittings begin. 
Stephen, King of England, d., 1154. 

" Moderation is good sense." 
Mrs. Hester Chapone born, 1727. 
St. Simon and St. Jude. 



22tttr ^nn^an aft. Wximtjr. 

" Love makes all things possible." 
All Hallows' Eve. 



1 Si;n 


Moox 
Rises 
&Sets 


G 2r 


Rises 

A.M. 


5:i4s 


3 36 


G t,v 


4 43 


h •29;> 


Sds 
J'.M. 


C 9r 


5 11 


5 2.-;^ 


5 35 


C \h^ 


6 4 


5 20,s 


6 42 


6 lor 


7 31 


5 IGs 


8 30 


619r 


9 41 


5 12s 


10 59 


G22r 


Morn. 


5 7s 


21 


6 26r 


144 


5 2s 


3 8 


G29r 


4 32 


4 59s 


lilSGS 

P.M. 


6 33r 


4 51 


4 55s 


5 25 


G36r 


6 6 


4 51s 


6 58 


6 40r 


7 53 


4 47s 


8 58 


6 43r 


10 5 


4 43s 


11 11 


6 47r 


Morn. 


4 39s 


18 


6 50r 


121 


4 35s 


2 30 


6 54r 


3 38 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



A MAN will never chansre his 
mind, if lie Las no mind lo 
change. 

Mes of gront genius should 
not forget tliat tlieir failings 
or vices are more apt to be 
noticed and even admired than 
their virtues. 



There is no doctrine so 
false as not to coutain in it 
some truth. 

AN' active and faithful 
nieiuory doubles life; for it 
lirings a man again upon its 
stage Willi all those who have 
made their exits. 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 



William, dear," said little Mrs. 
Mater at breakfast, ''have you, read 
this article on ' IJow to tell a had 
egg-?" '-No," said William, "■hut 
my advice is, if yon hane amtthing to 
ted a bad egg. break it gently." 

1.— October derives its name from 
the Latin words Veto, eitht, and 
imber, a shower of rain, and was the 
eighth month in the calendar oE 
Romulus, but was changptl to the 
teuth month by Numa. The num- 
ber of Its days in tiie time of 
Romulus was the sameasat present. 
Niinia reduced them to twoncv-nine- 
but Juliusand Augustus Cassar each 
added one day, so that the original 
number was restored, and has not 
since been altered. 

By our Anglo-Saxon ancestors this 
month was called Wiin Monutli, or 
wine month : "and albeit they iiad 
not antiently wines made in Ger- 
many, yet in this season had they 
thein from divers countries ad- 
joining.' 

. 2.— Pheasant shooting in October 
IS very pleasant, for, as the antunui 
shoot of green just tips the oaks 
and the tints upon the trees are 
daily deepening, all the surrouud- 
ings are so good that your aiijiivcia- 
tionof theiuaddstoyourenjoviiieut 
of the sport. There Is a glorious 
combination of colour, then, in the 
velvet greens on the wooded knolls 
and in the fading fernsand bi-Mckeu 
—brown-stained and splashed with 
hues from gold to purple— which 
seems to harmonise with the game 
you seek; and you note it as the 
cock hud. with a wliir, gets up and 
rockets—lord of the wuods-iu all 
his hrilliancj-. 

I'iie.-is.nts will stick to the woods 
even when llusheJ by ihe beattrs, 
and you cm also beiiin with them 
as soon as you like; for, if you 
watch where they feed overnight, 
you will liiid them near there in the 
juorning, exeei.t when the uis-'ht 
has been wet, when thebrood-ihe 
' n:de' — will take to the liedLterows 
to e-icape from the drip of the 
branches. 

Pheasant breeding, however is 
expensive work, not only from' its 
beiongiugs, but because, in addiiiou 
to Its natural euemies— weasel, fox 
stoat, rat, and hedgehog— the bird 
IS constantly exposed to the wiles 
of the poachers and to the arts of 
their set. 

21.-George IT., when Prince 
Regent, remarked to Colman- 
'•Why, Colman, you are older than 
I am." 

"Oh, no, sir,'- replied Colman. "I 
could not take the libertv of coming 
into the world before your Royal 
Highness." 

25. — Stephen terminated his 
troubled reign at Dover, and found 
a resting-phue l)y the side of his 
queen and son at the monasiery of 
F.iversham, in Kent, which he had 
founded. There his corpse remaned 
till the dissolution of the abbeys, 
when, for the possession of the 
leaden coffin, it was exhumed, and 
its contents thrown into the sea. 

30. —Amongst the very first 



'the eemembeancb of a wbll- spent life is sweet.' 



batch of the forty Royal Acade- 
micians was Angelica KaufEiiiaiin, 
liorii on tlie SOili of October, 17J1, 
who became famous as a painter of 
classic and mytholo.sical pictures, 
and as a portrait painter, and was 
befriended by Sir Josliua Jleynolds. 

31.— The close of the last dayoE 
October is Icnown a;5 Halloween, or 
All Hallow Eve, the hallowed even- 
ing of All Saints' Day, November 1 ; 
and it is reyarded, even now, with 
much superstition throughoutGrcat 
Britain and Ireland. 

It is the evening for spirits to 
appear and for ghosts to wander ; 
and the child who is born ou that 
uii-'ht is believed to possess the 
power of seeing supernatural ob- 
jects—a siipersti tii m that was turned 
to account by Sir Walter Scott in 
"The Monastei-y." 

Spirits are invoked by sowing 
henipseed, and by many other 
incantations. The witches were 
warded off the corn at Hallow- 
een, boili in Scotland and England, 
by the waving of a lighted bi'and 
or straw ; and, similarly, lighted 
candles were used to drive them 
from theMallcin Tower,in theforest 
of I'endle, Lancashire. 

In Wales, bonfires were kindled on 
Halloween, and white stones cast 
into the ashes, and if any stone was 
not visible on tlie next morning, it 
was considered that the person who 
threw it would not live to see 
another anniversary of the day. 

The same practice and belief exist 
in the Scottish Higlilands. The 
bonfire at Balmoral, on Halloween, 
is on a large scale, and has often 
been witnessed by her Majesty, who 
has carried a lighted torch— her 
lloyal children doing the same— to 
toss upon the fire, in which a gro- 
tes(iue fl!-'ure is burnt, whose sup- 
jiosed cries are presumed to be 
drowned by the sound of the bag- 
pipes. 

The first rite to be observed in 
connection with this festival in 
Scotland was that of pulling a hail 
runtor cabbage sialk. The company 
must go outside tlie house, "hand 
in hand, with eyes shut, and pull the 
first they meet with 1 Its being big 
or little, straight or crooked, is pro- 
phetic of the size and shape of the 
grand object of all their spells— the 
husband or wife." If any particles 
of earth remained attached to the 
stalk, it meant that ihe future part- 
ner in life would have money, ar.d 
from "the taste of the custoc, that 
is the heart of the stem," might be 
determined the temper of the affi- 
anced. To conclude the ceremony, 
these cabbage-stalks were put over 
the door, "and theOhrisf.an names 
of the people whoiji .-hance brings 
into the house are,iiCcording to tiio 
priority of placing the lunts, the 
names in question. 

Another curious Halloween rites 
was the winnowing of three 
"wecbtsof nothing" — that is to 
say, repeating three times the 
action of exposing corn to the wind. 
The future husband or wife \v 
then sure to appear. 



"THE LITTLE WIZARD OF WALL 
STREET.^' 



•' Love and a crown, no rivalsMp can 

lear; 
All precious things are still possessed 

luitli fear." 

Drylen. 



XT may, without exaggeration, be said that Mr. Jay Gould 
— tiie Little Wizard of Wall Street as he was generally 
called — who died in the close of lSf)2, was one of the 
most I'eiiiarkable Americans of the last half century. P'or no 
other citizen of the United States has, unaided by family 
connection, unassisted by friends, or what is commonly 
called "luck," written himself so deeply into the day by day 
tinancial history of the Republic ; no other man, perhaps, 
exercised such a baneful iuflueuce on the moral character of 
the community. 

Judged as a money-getter alone, he was undoubtedly one 
of the most successful men of the age. About forty years ago 
his entire fortune amounted to £1,000, and he was practically 
an unknown man, a director in a small bank in the slow- 
going town of Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. When he died 
he owned or controlled one-tenth of the railway mileage of 
the United States, one-twentieth of the mileage of the world, 
owned or controlled 180,000 miles of telegraph wires, over 
which one-quarter of the telegraph business of the world is 
handled, and Avas the possessor of a fortune estimated at 
from fifteen to twenty millions sterling. 

And what makes this result all the more astounding is that 
Mr. Gould enjoyed no special monopoly, was protected and 
fostered by no special tariff, was the owner of no great patent 
right producing a certain revenue. His fortune was made in 
a way open to any of his countrymen, and made largely out of 
his countrymen, who tried to play, but failed in playing, his 
peculiar role of railway wrecker. 

Jay Gould was born on a small farm near Roxbury, a small 
town in Delaware County, New York, on May 27, 1836, and 
was, therefore, at the time of his death, in his 57th year. Until 
he reached the age of fourteen he assisted his father with the 
farm work. At that age he entered the Hobart Academy. 
His father being unable to support him while he was obtain- 
ing an education, the boy kept "the village blacksmith's books, 
and received in return for this service board and lodging. 
The expenses of his schooling were defrayed by the local shop- 
keepfr, for whom he did odd jobs. 

He early developed a laste for mathematics, and, upon 
leavl'ag school, decided to become a surveyor. His first 
work, a map of Ulste>' County, New York, gave such satis- 
faction that he was encouraged to extend the scope of his 
labour, and when only a lad of seventeen he had organised 
and put into the field five surveying parties. As a result of 
this enterprise he found himself, at the age of nineteen, with 
a credit balance at the bank of £1,000. But before long over- 
work and exposure to the malarial air of the swamps brought 
on a serious attack of typhoid fever, and this led him to 
abandon his chosen profession. 

About tliis time he made the acquaintance of Mr. Zadock 
Pratt, a timber merchant, who despatched him to the 
timber district of New York State to select a site for and to 
open up a saw mill. This Avork he accomplished to the satis- 
faction of Mr. Pratt, who took him into partnership, and later 
on withdrew in his favour. But Mr. Gould, even at this 
early age, seems to have possessed a wonderful talent for 
r lading the signs of the times, and noting the growth of 
'■ Wild Cat" banks, as they were called at the time, all over 
lite country, and seeing trouble in the near future, as a con- 
c-')quence of inflated currency, and extended credits, he sold 
I >-ut his timber mill and went to live in Stroudsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, converting, meanwhile, all his little fortune into 
gold. 

The panic of 1857 swept over the United States, and all 
railway securities dropped as far below their natural value 
as they had ranged above it heretofore. This was Gould's 



11th Month,! 
1899. J 



NOVEMBER— 30 days. 



r EDUCATION 

Lmakbs the ma». 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



New Moon 3rd, 

First Quarter 10th, 

Full Moon 17th, 

Last Quarter 25th, 



27 min. past 10 morning. 
35 min, past 1 afternoon. 
18 min. past 10 morning. 
35 min. past 6 morning. 



BON DROIT A BESOIN d'AIDE- 
CAUSE KEED3 HELP. 



All Saints' Day. 2. All Souls' 
" Hope is as cheap as despair." 
Mikado of Japan born, 1852. 
5. Gunpowder Plot, 1605. 



25rtr .^untra^ aft. Crittit^ 

CoUey Gibber, dramatist, born, 1671. 

" Try he/ore you trust." 
John Milton, poet, died, 1674. 
Prince of Wales born, 1841. 
9. Lord Mayor's Day. 
Martinmas. Scottish Quarter Day. 



Mt\j ^nnha-^ aft. Crittit^. 

Rossini, musical composer, died, 1868 
Dr. John Abercrombie died, 1844. 
"A friend to all is a friend to none." 
John Bright born, 1811. 
Suez Ganal opened, 1869. 
Fall of Ears, 1877. 



^5th ^ittttray aft. Sritttt^. 

Thomas Ghatterton, poet, born, 1752. 
Empress Frederick of Germany born, 
St. Cecilia. C^S^^- 

" The cat sees not every mouse." 
Lord Melbourne died, 1848. 
John Gibson Lockhart died, 1854. 



26tlT ^Utttraj aft. Sriitttj, 

Unkindness has no remedy at law." 

29. Donizetti, mus. composer,b.,179S. 

30. Archbishop of Canterbury,b.,1821. 
St. Andrew's Day. 



Sun 
Rises 
&Sets 


Moon 
Rise? 

&Sets 


i> 

< 


6 56r 


Sets 
P.M. 


28 


4 29s 


3 38 


29 


6 59r 


4 6 


• 


4 26s 


4 41 


1 


7 2r 


5 27 


2 


4 22s 


6 24 


3 


7 6r 


7 32 


4 


4 19s 


8 49 


5 


710r 


10 9 


6 


4 16s 


1130 


D 


713r 


Morn. 


8 


4 13s 


50 


9 


717r 


2 12 


10 


4 10s 


3 33 


11 


7 20r 


4 54 


12 


4 7s 


6 13 


13 


7 24r 


Rises 
P.M. 


O 


4 5s 


4 44 


15 


7 27r 


5 40 


16 


4 2s 


6 42 


17 


7 30r 


7 48 


18 


4 Os 


8 56 


19 


7 34r 


10 3 


20 


3 58s 


11 9 


21 


7 37r 


Morn. 


([ 


3 56s 


15 


23 


7 40r 


122 


24 


3 54s 


2 30 


25 


7 43r 


3 38 


26 


3 53s 


4 50 


27 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



There is so immediate a 
relation between our thoughts 
and gestures that a woman 
must think well to look well, 

Thebe are few people who 
are more often in the wrong 
than those who cannot endure 
to be so. 



Commend a fool for his wit, 
or a knave for his honesty, and 
they will receive you into their 
bosom. 

No action will be considered 
as blameless, unless the will 
was so, for by the will the act 
was dictated. 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 

The secret of success is concentra- 
tion ; wherever there has been a great 
life or a great work, that has gone 
before. Taste everything a little, look 
at everything a little, but live for one 
thing. Anything is possible to a 
man who knows his end, and makes 
straight font, and for it alone. 

13.— Rossini was, we believe, the 
hero of the "record " price forafew 
lessons. When he was in London 
in 1823-4, the composer, as the story 
goes, was worried by a nobleman 
who wanted singing lessons, and in 
order to put a stop to theannoj-ance 
he asked the prohibitive price of a 
hundred guineas a lesson. To his 
amazement the offer was accepted. 

20.— Tn the annals of literature 
there is no example recorded of pre- 
cocious talent which can vie with 
that of Thomas Chatterton. 

When he was about sixteen years 
of age the new bridge at Bristol was 
completed, and in connection with 
thMt event he gave to the world the 
flrst article of the series of literary 
forgeries which has immortalised 
hun. It was sent to Farley's Bristol 
Journal, and w&s called "a descrip- 
tion of the Friars flrst passing 
over the old bridge: taken from 
an ancient manuscript." 

He sulisequently, from time to 
time, produced various poems of 
pre-eminent beauty, clothed in 
antique language. The language, 
however, was not that of any one 
period ; nor was the style, nor in 
many instances the form of com- 
position, that of the fifteenth cen- 
tury, the age to which he assigned 
them. 

He pretended that they were 
written by Thomas Rowley, a priest, 
and Tliomas Caiiynge. and that they 
were copied from parchments, which 
his father had found in a large box 
in a room over the chapel on the 
north side of Redciiffe church. 

While he was engaged in com- 
posing these poems he was also a 
lil)eral contributor of prose and 
verse to the magazines. 

Having, in his moody moments, 
avowed an inteniion of committing 
suicide, his master— an attorney— 
leleased him from his indentures, 
and Chatterton repaired to London, 
where he resolved to depend upon 
his pen for sul>sistence. 

At the outset his hopes were 
raised to a high pitch, but they 
were soon blighted. In spite of his 
wonderful fertility and his per- 
severing exertions, he seems to 
h.ive been unable to provide for the 
day tliat was passing over hiin. 
Privations and wounded pride drove 
him to despair, and, on the i',5th of 
August, 1770, he put an end to his 
existence l)y poison. 

22.— St. Cecilia was a Roman 
lady of good family, whose devotion 
to Christianity was the cause of her 
death. According to some she was 
boiled to death, and others say she 
was beheaded. 

24.— Lord Melbourne deserves 
kindly remembrance as the flrst 
guide— and a safe guide he was— 
in political ailairs to her Majesty 
the Queen. As a minister he had 



THE 0EEAT AND THE LITTLE tt^YE NEED 01* ONE ANOTHEE." 



his faults. The Orieutal preceiit, 
" When j'ou are in doulit whether 
an action Is good or bad, abstaih 
from It," was raised by him into a 
policy. 

His eternal question, " Cannot 
you leave it alone?" disposed of 
every project of reform or irapi'ove- 
raent ; while his reflection that 
"Nobody ever did anything very 
foolish except from strong prin- 
ciple," seemed to make those re- 
forms which justice the most 
required the most inexpedient. 

26.— Lockhart's strong, complex 
character, and his reserve, have 
caused him to he often misjudged. 
" He had a very warm heart, often 
concealed by a cold, reserved man- 
ner." "There never lived a man 
more high-minded and truthful ; 
more willing to make sacrifices for 
the comfort of others ; more faith- 
ful to old ties of friendship and 
affection." 

In appearance he was tall, slight, 
and handsome, with dark hair and a 
broad, black brow, indicating force 
and penetration. 

29. — Donizetti was one of the 
four men who have led the musical 
and dramatic movement in Italy 
during the present century. The 
rival of Bellini, he walked in the 
footsteps of Rossini, and prepared 
the way for Verdi. He was, par ex- 
cellence; the musician of his time 
and of his race. He sang, as the bird 
sings, with(uit effort, without a dis- 
play of useless science, always sin- 
cere alike in his sad and in his gay 
moments. 

30.— St. Andrew, the patron saint 
of Scotland, for some unaccountable 
reason, would seem to have been 
the patron saint of lovers ; as the 
poet has said— 

'To Andrew all the lovers and the 
lusty wooers come." 

In a "History of Kent," written 
by Hasted, an account is given of a 
curious custom which used to 1ie 
observed on this day at Easling, 
before the Game Laws were as strict 
as they are now :— 

" On St. Andrew's Day, November 
SO, there is yearly a diversion called 
squirrel hunting in this and the 
neighbouring parishes, when the 
labourers and lower kinds of people, 
assembling together, form a lawless 
rabble, and being accoutred with 
guns, poles, clubs, and other such 
weapons, spend the greatest part of 
the day in parading through the 
woods and grounds, with loud shout- 
ings, and under pretence of de- 
molishing the squirrels, some few 
of which they kill, they destroy 
numbers of hares, pheasants, part- 
ridges, and, in short, whatever 
conies in their way, breaking down 
the hedges, and doing much -other 
mischief, and in the evening betak- 
ing themselves to the alehouses, 
finish their career there, as is usual 
with such sort of gentry." 



Oft what seems 
A trifle, a mere rtolhing, by itself. 
In some nice situations, turns the 

scale 
Of Fate and rules the most important 
actions, 

Thomsoit. 



opportunity, and he put every dollar he had in the World into 
the securities of the Rutland and Washington Railway — a 
railway with whose physical condition and natural traffic 
possibilities he was perfectly familiar. These securities he 
had the good fortune to secure at ahout 10 per cent, of their 
face value. 

With the return of confidence and the recovery of trade, 
Mr. Gould launched out still further, and, after two success- 
ful speculations, moved to New York City, in 1859, and 
established himself as a broker in Wall Street, his fortune at 
this time being estimated at £20,000, all in cash. Every 
dollar of this money he now invested in the securities of the 
Erie Railway Company, becoming a director and afterwards 
its president, an office he retained until the reorganisation of 
the company in 1872. 

It was during this period that the great struggle for control 
took place between Commodore Vanderbilt and Gould. Jay 
Gould had " gone short" of — that is, sold — his own shares; 
Vanderbilt, who had been watching for just this opportunity, 
bought the shares as fast as Gould sold them. But just when 
he thought to crush Gould and wrest the control of the rail- 
way from him, Gould issued an immense batch of new 
shares, and so got safely out of the difficulty. This issue was 
declared illegal, and Gould was ultimately forced to restore 
£1,200,000, but this came too late to serve Vanderbilt, and tlie 
attack only resulted in adding some millions to Jay Gould's 
fortune. 

After leaving the Erie Company, Mr. Gould bought his 
way into the Union Pacific, Wabash, Texas Pacific, St. 
Louis and Northern, Missouri Pacific, and Missouri, Kansas, 
and Texas, taking the latter out of the hands of the receiver. 
He then turned his attention to the field of telegraphy. He 
organised the Atlantic and Pacific Telegraph Company, and 
when this company was absorbed by the Western Union, the 
great monopoly, he set on foot the American Union Tele- 
graph Company, which a few years later was absorbed in the 
same way. After this he bought the control of the Western 
Union. In 1881 he became largely interested in the elevated 
railway system of New York City. 

From time to time combinations were formed to ruin him, 
but in some way the " Little Wizard of Wall Street," managed 
to defeat them all. Upon one occasion, it was reported in 
Wall Street that "Gould was bankrupt." Two hours later 
—it was on March 13, 1882 — Mr. Gould invited a committee 
of bankers to meet at his private office. When they had all 
arrived he handed over for their inspection certificates of 
stock, in his own name, having a face value of £10,600,000, 
at the same time offering to produce certificates for 
£4,000,000 more if the committee had not seen enough to 
convince them of his solvency. 

For several years previous to his death he gradually with- 
drew from active participation in the management of his 
railway properties, leaving the greater portion of this work 
in the hands of two of his sons. Such is the history of Jay 
Gould as the world at large knew him— a man who had per- 
haps, more enemies, and of whom more abuse was written 
than of any other citizen of the United States. And yet tlie 
side which he kept hidden from the world, in which he 
played such an important part, was in many ways a 
striking contrast. 

Probably no man in America worked harder during his life 
than Jay Gould. It was his habit to rise at 6 a.m. in summer, 
and 7 in winter, and from that hour until midnight his busy 
brain was at work with but few intermissions. Every 
detail of each system of railway line was at his fingers' 
ends, the accounts and returns were closely studied, and 
every official was known and watched. 

He never smoked, seldom took wine, and never drank 
spirits. An hour in the orchid-house, a few moments with 
his books in the library, a quiet drive with his wife, who 
idolised him — these were his pleasures. 



12tli Montli,"! 
1S93. J 



DECEMBER— 31 days. 



r THE EX 
L THE 



■\VOEK. 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 

New Moon 3rd 4S min. past morning. 



Fir at Quarter Pth, 

Full Moon 17th, 

Last Quarter 25tli, 



min. past 9 afternoon. 
31 min. past 1 morning. 
57 min. past 3 morning. 



LA PEUR EST GRAND INVENTEUR FEAE 13 

A GREAT INVENTOR. 


Son 
Rises 
&Sets 

7 46r 
3 51s 
7 49r 
3 50r, 
7 52r 
3 50s 
7 54r 
3 49s 
7 56r 

3 49s 

7 59r 
3 49s 

8 Ir 
3 49s 
8 3r 
3 49s 
8 4r 
3 49s 
8 5r 
3 50s 
8 6r 
3 51s 
8 7r 
3 52s 
8 8r 
3 54s 
8 8r 
3 56s 
8 8r 
3 57s 

8 9r 


Moon 
Rises 

&Sets 

Sets. 
P.M. 

3 18 

4 12 

5 19 

6 35 

7 56 
9 19 

10 40 

Morn. 

1 

120 

2 38 

3 56 

5 12 

6 22 

7 24 
Rises 
P..\J. 

5 32 

6 40 

7 47 

8 54 

10 1 

11 6 
Morn. 

12 
119 

2 29 

3 41 

4 52 

6 1 

7 1 


o3 

SB 


1 1 F j Princess of Wales born, 1844. 
2jS [Marquis of Lotliian born, 1833, 


28 
29 


3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 
9 


M 

Ta 

w 

Th 
F 

S 


Thomas Carlyle born, 1795. 
Alexandre Dumas died, 1870, 
Henry VI. of England born, 1421. 

" Fortune favours the brave." 
Dr. John Arbuthnot born, 1658. 
George Washington died, 1799. 


1 
2 

3 
4 
5 

D 


10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 


M 

Tu 
W 
Th 
F 

S 


^tttr .^utttra^j in ^trtient. 

10. Black Game and Grouse Shooting ends. 

" Skillis no burden." 
Dr. Johnson died, 1784 i ; :. 
Prince Consort died, 1861. 
Admiral Benbow born, 1650, 
Diogenes, Greek philosopher, died, b.g' 


7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 


17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 


5) 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S' 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 


5rti ^itntra^ in ^tiiisnt. 

Sir John Glanvil born, 1590. 

J. M. W. Turner, artist, died, 1851. 

" Truth never grows old. " 
St. Tliomas's Day.—Winter commences. 
21. Michaelmas Law Sittings end. 
24. Rt. Hon. John Morley b., 1838, 


O 
15 
16 

17 
18 
19 
20 


24 
25 

26 
27 
28 
29 
30 


4tlj ^utttraiT in ^trtient. 

Christmas Day. 

Boxing Day.— Bank Holiday. 

" Most men worship the rising mm." 
Innocents' Bay.— Childermas. 
Rt. Hon. W. E. Gladstone b., 1809. 
Titus, Roman Emperor, born, 41. 


21 

a 

23 
24 
25 
26 
27 


311S 


.^nntta^ aft. ©Ijmtmas. 


28 



WORDS OF THE WISE. 



To be doprired of the person 
we love, is a happiuos in com- 
parison of living with one we 
bare. 

Ip ynu wifh to appear agree- 
aiile in society, you must con- 
sent to be taught many things 
wliich you Ijnow already.' 



"I HAVE seldom," says Paley, 
" known any one who deserted 
truth in trifles, that could be 
trusted in matters of importance." 

A WAN cannot possess any 
thing that is better than a good 
wonun, nor any thing that la 
wors*! than a bad one. 



NOTES TO THE CALENDAR. 



A wealthy man displaying ove 
day his jewels to a philosopher, iha 
latter said, "Thank yon, sir, fur 
being willing to share surh magnifi- 
cent jewels with me." "Share them 
ivith you, sir ? What do you mean f " 
'■ II hy, you allow me to look at them, 
and what more can you do with them 
yourself? " 

5.— Alexandre Dumas the elder 
wns apt to be boastful at times. 
Tbus, he once observed at an even- 
ing p;u't.v— "I ahvMys keep a hun- 
dred louis d'or at the disposal of 
my friends." 

The very next morning a " good 
friend " called to borrow these hun- 
dred pieces of gold ; liuc Dumas, 
who was not to be caught napping, 
answered with a smile—" Ah my 
dear fellow, you didu't quite talce 
in my meaning. To be sure I always 
keep a hundred louis at my disposal 
for my friends ; but if I were to 
lend you the amount, it would no 
longer be at my disposal. Very 
sorry ! " 

8.— Dr. Arbuthnot in early life 
went down into Devonshire to prac- 
tise HS a physician, but the neigh- 
bourhood was so healthy he could 
get little or nothing to do. 

One morniuga gentleman met the 
doctor riding furiously towards 
Exeter. "Halloal Doctor I "e.K- 
claimed the former, "where are you 
riding in such a hurry ? " 

" Out of this vile country," cried 
Arbuthnot in a rage, "in which a 
man can neiUier live nor die 1 " 

IS.— Benbow was no scientific 
seaman. He was a sailor of the old 
school, who preferred to grapi>le 
with his foe and fight till ciiher 
himself or bis antagonist was de- 
stroyed, rather than indulge in 
those complicated movements for 
choice of position and the like, 
which in later years were to mark 
the efforts of our Admirals. He 
was a man who helped to make the 
Navy popular, and tlumgh a strict 
disciplinarian lie never lost the 
confidence and admiration of his 
crews. 

His death was a sacrifice. Had 
he lived another ten years his name 
might have been linked with s(nne 
of the greiitest naval victories of 
the eighteenth ceniury. As it was, 
he was called away when Kngl.-md 
most needed him, and before she 
had established her supremacy on 
the sea. 

16.— Diogenes, washing his cab- 
bages, cried out to Aristippus, '■ If 
you could cat cabliages you would 
not have to pay court to the great." 

" And you," replied Aristippus, 
" If you knew how to pay court to 
the great would not have to eat 
cabbages." 

18.— Here is a pleasing instance 
of fraternal generosity related by 
Sir Matthew Hale in connection 
with the celebi'ated lawyer. Sir 
John Glanvil. "Gianvil'sfather had 
a fair estate, which he iniendiHl to 
settle on his elder brother ;"but he 
b?ing a vicious young man, and 
there appearing no hopes of his 
recovery, he s^^ttfcd it on him that 
was his second s >n. 



■ THE HIGHEST BEANCH IS NOT THE SAFEST BOOST.' 



" Dpon his death his eldest son, 
finding that what he h;id before 
looked ui)OD aa the threateniugs of 
an angry father, was now but too 
certain, became melancholy -, and 
that by degrees wrought so great a 
Change on him, that what his father 
could not prevail in while he lived 
was now effected by the severity of 
his last will, so that it was now too 
late for him to change in hopes of 
an estate that was gone from him. 

" But his brother, observing the 
reality of the change, resolved 
within himself what to do ; so he 
called hiiu, with many of his 
friends, together to a feast ; and 
after other dishes had been served 
up to tJie dinner, he ordered one 
that was covered to be set before 
his brother and desired him to un- 
cover iD ; which he doing, the 
company was surprised to find it 
full of writings. So he told them 
that he was now to do what he was 
sure his father would have done 
if he had lived to see that happy 
change which they now all saw in 
his lirother, and therefore he freely 
restored to hiiu the whole estate." 

25.— On Christmas Eve the one 
inece of medi-.evalism which still 
siuvivcs in the Christmas cere- 
monies at Court makes its most 
inuiosing Qrst appearance. This is 
tlie.great baron of beef. This truly 
Uoyal joint is cooked at Windsor, 
fur the Osborne ranges are notlarge 
enough for the purpose. 

Knnn the great Windsor kitchens 
— wliL'ie Will Somers fought with 
I'n tell— come also a gigantic wood- 
cock pasty, a Koyal boars head, and 
the yucen's iihini-pudding. 

The pluni-pndding is a worthy 
companion of its magnificent asso- 
cia es. It is a giant among plum- 
puddings- Jlont Blanc amid the 
aialverh Hills. Some idea of the 
yueeu's Christmas pudding may be 
gatlieicd from the fact that when 
an Al|i of it has been set aside for 
despatch to Osborne, there still 
renininsa whole range to be divided 
up into small hills, which are Eent 
in the Queen's name to the various 
members of her posterity scattered 
about the world. 

28.— This day— known as Inno- 
cents' (lay, the Holy Innocents' 
Day, Childermas Day, or Childer- 
mas—has lieen observed from the 
earliest days of the Church in com- 
memoration of the massacre of the 
(hildren in Bethlehem, ordered by 
King Herod. 

It used to be held unlucky to 
marry on this day, or to begin any 
work or enter on any undertaking— 
In fact, it was reckoned as ai)out 
the most unlucky day of the whole 
year. In some parts of England it 
was even held unlucky to sweep the 
house. 

In ancient times the massacre of 
the innocents might be said to be 
annually re-enacted in the form of 
a smart whipping, which it was 
customary to administer to the 
children on this day, to impress 
upon their memories this leading 
evcut in sacred history. 



A GIFT TO A PRIMA DONNA. 



Grateful is the noise of noble deeds 
To nolle hearts. 

Tennyson. 



SEVERAL years ago, when Vienna was the centre-point 
of every sort of amusement and gaiety, a certain young 
Prince paid his first visit to the Imperial town. Ho 
was very much smitten by the charms of a popular prima 
donna, who was at that time singing in Vienna. He gave a 
reception, at which he invited the lady to sing as his guest. 

The Prince desired to give her a lasting and costly remem- 
brance of the occasion, and, after consulting with his aide-de- 
camp on the subject, decided that his own portrait set in 
a frame of diamonds would be the most appropriate gift. 
The Prince designed the frame himself, and sent to Paris to 
have it manufactured. It was oval in shape, made of filigree 
gold ; at the base the initials of the singer and the emblems of 
music were set in diamonds of enormous value. 

Two days after the frame had been left at the house of the 
singer the Prince's aide-de-camp received a letter of thanks 
from her, in which she said that she would always value the 
frame as a remembrance of his Highness ; and that the work 
was so tasteful and the stones so brilliant that they might 
easily be mistaken for real. 

The Prince was very much excited by this letter, and 
immediately sent his aide-de-camp to the singer in order to 
assure her that the stones were real by having them tested at 
a jeweller's. The lady at first refused, saying that she valued 
the frame as a remembrance of the Prince, and not for its 
worth, but the aide-de-camp insisted upon her accompanying 
him to a well-known jeweller's. The stones were tested, and 
the jeweller stated, much to the aide-de-camp's amazement, 
that they were undoubtedly false, being merely good paste 
diamonds. 

The question now arose— How and when had they been 
changed ? The jeweller who had manufactured the frame in 
Paris was above suspicion, and it had only passed through 
the hands of the Prince and his aide-de-camp before it was 
delivered to the prima donna. The strictest inquiries were 
instituted, but it was in vain ; the mystery could not be 
cleared up. It ended in the Prince taking back the frame 
and sttbstituting an equally valuable present. 

Two years later the Prince again visited Vienna. In the 
meantime the matter had passed away from the memory of 
all but himself, and with hiiu it was still a sore subject. 

One day, when walking along one of the principal streets of 
Vienna, his eye was attracted by a diamond frame in a jeweller's 
window. Upon examining it he found it to be a counterpart 
of the frame he had designed himself two years before. 

He entered the shop and asked the man when and where he 
had procured it. The owner answered that it was his own 
work. About two years ago a lady had brought him a similar 
frame set in real diamonds. She had employed him to break 
out the real stones and replace them with paste, saying they 
were too good to be wasted in the frame, and that she wished 
to wear them. The jeweller stated that he was so struck with 
the elegance and the originality of the design that he had 
taken a drawing of it, from which he had made the frame in 
the window. 

The Prince, after that, when he wished to give singers a 
memento, confined himself to less costly souvenirs. 



SHADOWS. 

A zephyr moves the maple trees, 
And straightiuay o'er the grass 

The shadows of their branches sh%fl— 
Shift, love, hut do not pass. 

So though with time a change may cojtm 

Within my steadfast heart, 
The shadow of thy form may stir, 

But cannot, love, depart. 



"put not off eepentakoe till a future day." 



GOOD WORDS ARE WORTH MUCH. 



Virtue and good behaviour 
are naturally productive of good 
fortune. 



Retrospect brightens exist- 
ence only as it is replete with 
pleasant memories. 



The only really bitter tears 
are those which are shed in soli- 
tude. 



^**********)(<***)(t*****>|c**3|f^ Thoughts are but !|)r*****************+**)|c5)c:jc*^ 
¥r ^ dreams till their effects be ^ X. 

^ THE Chief Treasure. ^ tried. ■)(- A. Reason for Music. 5 

* *' It ne'er was wealth, it ne'er was -^ The river of time has $ Preposterous ass/ that never read t 
t wealth ;g; Its cataracts and falls, and * ^ so far ^ 

J That bnupht contentment, peace, 5: these are revolutions. ^ 10 icnowtJi Because tvhy Music was 



#***><c*>!c*^****=*'**)k*>|<**'t'j)c*:ic*>|c# 



Never Despair. 



^ Thehandsandhlisso' mutual love, * of our nature. Moral Ev 
^ Oh, that's the chief est world's c; is its own curse. 
■X- treasure." Burns. * THBfuturcdestinyof the 

* * child is always tbe worlc of 

^ ************************ ^ the mother. 

The only freedom we ought 
to care about is the freedom 
to do right. 

Everything unknown to 
us we suppose to be magni- 
ficent. 

There is a wide difference 
between true courage and a 
mere contempt of life. 

If you would not haveafHic- 

tiou visit you twice, listen at 
once to what it teaches. 

A WOMAN'S true dowry, let 
all girls remember, is Virtue, 
Modesty, and Desires re- 
strained: not that which is 
usually so called. 

There are many comfort- 
able people in the world, but 
to call any man perfectly 
happy is an insult. 

If the world knew what 
passes in my heart, what 
wouldit thinkof me? /know 
it ; what do I think of my- 
self ? 

We often hear of a person 
who has command of many 
languages, but it is seldom 
that one ia master of his own 
tongue. 

Many a woman is unhappy 
because she has not married 
the man that she loves. But 
often she would be infiiiitely 
unhappier if she had married 
him. 



^ ordained ! 

J Was it not to refresh the mind of 

^ man, 

^ After his studies, or his usual 



Pain ? 



Shakespeare. 



The opal-hiied and many perfumed 
Morn 

From Gloom is born ; 
From out the sullen depth of ebon 
Niciht 

The stars shed light ; 
Gems in the rayless caverns of the 
earth 

Have their slow hirlh ; 
From luondrous alchemy of winter- 
hours 

Come summer flowers ; 
The bitter waters of the restless 
main 

Give gentle rain ; 
The fading bloom and dry seed bring 
once more 

The year's fresh store ; 
Just sequences of clashing tones 
afford 

The full accord ; 
Through weary ages, full of strife 
and ruth, 

Thought reaches Truth ; : 
Through efforts, long in vain, pro- 
phetic Need 

Begets the Deed: 

Nerve then thy soul with direst need 
to cope ; 

Life's brightest Hope 
Lies latent in Fate's deadliest 
lair- 
Never despair ! 



^|> *************^^>|,^^>^>(.^j,,^^ ^^ 

Harmless mirth is the best 
cordial against the consump- 
tion of the spirits ; wherefore 
jesting is not unlawful, if it 
trespasseth not in quantity, 



anality, or season. 

The three great ends which 
a statesman ought to propose 
to himself in the government 
of a nation ai-e:— (I) SecLinry 
to possessois ; (i) Facility o 
acquirers ; aiid(..Oj Hope 10 all. 

HowEVEH dull a woman 
m:iy be she will understand 
all there is in love ; however 
intelligent a man mny be he 
will never know but half of it. 

BeautifUu ai-e the admoni- 
tions of him whose life ac- 
cords with his teachings. 

As riches and favour for- 
sake a man, we discover him 
to he a fool, but nobody could 
find it out in his prosperity. 

The worst part of affecta- 
tion is that there is generally 
so little art in it. 

He who imagines he can do 
without the world deceives 
himself much ; but he who 
fancies the world cannot do 
without him is still more mis- 
taken. 

"When men grow virtuous in 
their old age they are merely 
making a sacrifice to God of 
the Devil's leavings. 

^************************^ The stoical scheme of ^************************g). 
^ ^ supplying our wants by ^ ^ 

^ A USEFUL life * loppiug off our desires is -X- In an Autograph Album. * 

' %. like cutting off our feet |^ o'er the ivet sands an insect crept 



{©J********'^*******'^*********^ 



'^ I live for those who love me, 

tt For those icho know me true, 

t For the heaven that smiles above me. * ,^^;, '''%'' \% ^" 'r.!.'^ '" ^ * 

* And awaits my spirit too; -^^voild, it is soirow and .^ 

■g- For the cause that lacks assistance, 



when we want 
If ther( 



■^ Ages ere manonearth was known- 



evil in this it ^nd patient Time, while Nature * 

i heaviness of heart. The 2^ The slender tracing turned to stone. I1 
^ 'Twasthefirst autograph; andours? $ 



For the wrong that needs resist^ tlTcc^lgTsf^atttvi%e t 



For the future in the distance. 
And tlie good that I can do. 
Mrs. George L. Banks. 



#************************^ 



7 onlv evil as they occasion $ Inleuguewitli the Creative powers, * 
5 sorrow;— take .that out— $ Shall 'scape Obliiion's broom so 5 
^ the rest is fancy, and dwel- ■)(• long? ^ 

* leth only in the head of ^ James R. Lowell, t 

man. 



Five great enemies to peace 
dwell within us ; namely, avarice, 
ambition, envy, anger, and pride ; 
and if those enemies were to be 
banished we should infallibly 
enjoy perfect peace. Against 
them everyone must all his life 
be on the watch. 



The disposition to give ^ ************************ ^ 
a cup of cold water to a disciple 
is a far nobler property than the 
finest intellect. If one lias 



ight to be proud of anything, it 
is of a good action done, as it 
ought to be, without any base or 
unworthy interest lurking at the 
bottom of it. 



The apostles of error are never 
so dangerous as when they appear 
in the guise of grey-headed old 
men. 

The wicked, whilst alive, is 
like dead ; the righteous, after 
death, is still alive. 



THE LAST DBOP MAKES THE CUP BUN OVER.' 



LET THE JEST GO ROUND. 



She : "Would you love me more 
if I bad a million dollars ? " He: 
" Of course I would. I would 
have more time." 

"What does a marriage licence 
cost ? " " Well, really, ifshard 



Mrs, Tenapot : " I am so glad 
that you are engaged to Harold 
Willoughby. Was italong court- 
ship?" Miss Skidmore: "Not 
very. My cyclometer registered 
about 700 miles." 



Mr. Short : " My dear Maria, I 
find that you have overdrawn at 
the bank." Mrs. Short : " Oh, no ; 
that can"t be. I've got three of 
those blank cheaues left." 

Before we were married I 



^:^,.^>fj;ij,"./,?£;?, ™ ..°"" ^ mnnnnHnnWrnn'm nsedto see a .olden halo 
iuiuiueeuoi Lwtuuy j cd-ih. ^ ^ around her head." "Doa't 

Se: "Really, I never loved 
anyone until I met you." She: 
" Oh, I knew that. You acted 
just like a colt that was seeing 
Its first locomotive." 



Customer : " Did you see this 
steak broiled ? " Waiter : " No, 
sah." Customer: "I wish you 
would investigate. I have a 
suspicion that It was tanned." 

Boger : " Many people spend 



A Good Advertisemekt. 

Te actresse ladye, light ofhecle. 
And toondrous loud ofhntte, 

Stepped on a slippery orange peele 
And swiftly down her satte. - 

But was she grieved ? Nay, nay 1 In 
joy 

She rose and smoothed her dresse. 
And straight-way called a messageboy 

And notified ye presse. 



you see it now?" "No ; it 
looks just like any other 
girl's frizzy red hair." 

Little Flossie : " For shame ! 
Always tied to your mam- 
ma's apron-strings. Proud 
Gertie: "My mamma doesn't 
wear aprons. We keep a ser- 
vant." 

" I WANT something in a 
small check," said young Mr. 



half their lives saying, ' Wait 'dlY^r^^l-^M^fMMrWMVrM^ Twitrers,as ho examined the 
tlllmy ship comes in,' and when taiior's cloths. "Did you 



that ship comes in it usually 
has a cargo of atmosphere 
a deck load of wind." 



TiTEY were sitting out 
dance. He : " Here comes the 
young parson ! I wonder if he 



brinir a with you, sir?" , asked 
the tailor. " Bring what with 
me ? " " The small check." 



mwmnwmmnnwrm 




idly) : "Would- "" 
n't it be adv' 



Annie Moobb. 
A7mie Moore has gone aivay to get 
married. 
Her loss ive all deeply deplore ; 
'Mong hosts of friends here she had 
tarried. 
But she'll never come hack Annie 
Moore. 



Father-in-law: "Whatever has 
come over you, Frank ? Since you 
married you seem to have lost all 
ambition."' Frank: " Well, you 
see, sir, I reached the height of 
my ambition when I became your 
son-in-law." 

" Queer about girls." 
" What is queer?" "When 
my daughterwas single, she 
wouldn't let her little 
brothers and sisters touch 
her piano; now she is mar- 
ried she thinks there isn't 
a piano on earth too good 
for her baby to bang on." 



able for you to 
propose first ?" 
Vexed Wife: 
"There is no 
calamity that 
can befall a wo- 
man that I have 
not suffered," 

6a«^'.-''- wfonl: MUUUUUUWMUUWM 

"My wife got even with that 
burglar who set the burglar 
alarm going and woke the 
baby." " What did she do ? " 
"She pulled him in by the 
collar and made him rock the 



my dear ; now you have never 
been a widow." Vexed Wife : 
" I said calamit.v, sir ! " 

A NOVELIST is an unnatural 
phenomenon, because his tail 
comes out of his head. 



" Was that you who got up 
and left the hall while I was 
lecturing?" asked a public 
lecturer of a man he met at 
the door. "No, sir," was the 
quick reply ; " I was never 
known to walk in my sleep 
in my life." 

Mother (reading) : " Every 
name means something : 
Charlie means brave; Philip 
means fond— what does Jack 
mean ? " Daughter {who was 
also reading): "Oh, Jack? 
Why he means business! 
He told me so last night," 

" I SUPPOSE you like your new 
play very much," said the In- 
terviewer to the actress. " Yes, 
indeed." " No doubt the lines are 
quite bright." " Well, to be frank 
with you, I haven't read them 
yer. But the costumee are simply 
gorgeous." 



Spear Points. 

People who are all tongue have no 
ears. 

A good guide will not be rejected 
because he is bow-legged. 

No good comes of blaming others 
for the misfortunes ive bring on our- 
selves. 

The world that the bird flies over is 
not the same that the snail crawls on. 

Every boy thinks his mother is the 
best loonian on earth— and they are 
all of them right, too. 

Many a man who finds a cottage 
large enough loould find a palace too 
small, if suddenly made rich. 

There are two classes of men who 
never profit by their mistakes— those 
who blame it on their luives, av 
those who lay it all to Providence. 



|: 

"What if I should cease to 
love you ? " he asked in a mo- 
ment of reckless abandon. 
" Then, dear, I should have 
your letters published as 
unique contributions to the 
literature of the century," was 
the soothing reply. 



baby to sleep again." 

" Nurse," said the doctor, 
" give the baby a bath and 
take the thernidmeter, so 
that the water will not be 
too hot or too cold." "All 
right, sir ; but I don't need 
the instrument. If the little 
one gets blue, it's too cold; 
if she gets red, it's too hot." 

Harry: "I met Gibson in 
town, yesterday. He spoke 
of you." Dick: "Indeed! 
He remembered you, then ? " 
"Oh, yes, said he would 
never forget me." "Then 
you owe him money, too ? " 

"Every man has his vice," 
said Tenspot to Tenterhook, 
who was fond of offering 
unsought counsel to his 
acquaintances. " What is 
my vice, pray ? " asked 
Tenterhook, " Advice," re- 
plied Tenspot, unhesitat- 
ingly. 

Visitor: " What are you cry- 
ing about, my little man?" 
Little Willie : " All my brothers 
hez got a holiday, and I hain't 
got none." Visitor. "Why, 
that's too badi! How is that ? " 

Little Willie (between sobs) : 
" I don't go— to— school yet." 



" NOTHING WILL STTPPLY THE WANT OF PEUBENOE." 



ABBREVIATIONS IN COMMON USE. 



" D 



A.B.— Able-bodied seaman. 

A bp.— Archbishop. 

A.C. (Lat. Ante Christum).— Be- 
fore Christ. 

A/c. or ace' t.— Account. 

A.D. (Lat. Anno Domini'^.— In the 
year of our Lord. 

All fin. (Lat. Ad finem').— To the 
end. 

iEt. or ^tat. (Lat. ^tatis anno).— 
In the year of his age. 

AM. (Lat. Anno mundiX— In the 
year of the world. (Lat. Ante 
meridiem).— Before noon. 

Auou. — Anonymous. 

Al.— First class (of ships). 

A.R..\.— Associate of the Royal 
Academy. 

A. R.S. A.— Associate of the Royal 
Scottish Academy. 

B.A. or A.B. (Lat. Artiuni Bacca- 
Za?«-c/(s).— Bachelor of Arts. 

Bart, or Ht.— Baronet. 

B.C.— Before Christ. 

B.C.L. — Bachelor of 
Civil Law. 

B. D. — Bachelor of Di- 
vinity. 

B/L.-Hill of Lading. 
B.Sc. — Bachelor of 

Science. 
Bp.— Bishop. 

C. or Cap. (Lat. Caput).— 
Chai)ter. 

C.A.— (_;iiartered Accountnnt. 

C.B.— Companion of the Bath. 

CH.— Civil Engineer. 

ceiu. (i.ai. centum,.- A hundred, 
frequently, £100 ; as, Three per 
cent. 

Cf. (Lat. Co?7/er).— Compare. 

O.f.i.— Cost freight and insur- 
ance. 

Ch. or Chap.— Chapter. 

t'hq.— Cheque. 

Clk.— Clerk. 

Co.— Company. County. 

Cr.— Creditor. 

C.S.T.— Companion of the Star of 
India. 

curt. — Current ; the present 
month. 

cwt.— Hundredweight. 

deg.— Degree. 

D.C.L.— Doctor of Civil Law. 

D.D.— Doctor of Divinity. 

D.U. (Lat. Dei gratia).— By the 
grace of God. 

Do. (ital. Ditto}.— Tixe same. 

Dr.— Doctor. Debtor. Drachm, 
or Drnra. 

D.Sc— Doctor of Science. 

D.V. (Lat. Deo volente).— God will- 
ing. 

dwt— Pennyweight. 

e.g. (Lat. exempli gratia).— For 
example. 

etc. or &c. (Lat. et cceter a). —And 
the rest ; and so forth. 

Ex.— Example. 

P.I). (Lat. Fidei Defensor).— De- 
fender of the Faith. 

P.G.S.— Fellow of the Geological 
Society. 

fl.— Flourished. Florin. 

F.M.-Field Marshal. 

Fo. or fol.— Folio. 

F.P.A. — Free of particular 
average. 

P.Ii.C.P. — Fellow of the Royal 
College of Physicians. 

F.R.C.S. — Fellow of the Royal 
College of Surgeons. 



F.R.S.— Fellow of the Royal 
Society. 

Fr't.— Freight. 

ft. -Foot. 

fur.— Furlong. 

F'wd.— Forward. 

gal.— Gallon. 

G. A.— General Average. 

G.C.B.— Knight Grand Cross of 
the Bath. 

G.C.M.G.- Knight Grand Cross of 
St. Michael and St. George. 

G.C.S.L — Knight Grand Com- 
mander of the Star of India. 

G. P.O.— General Post Office. 

Gr.- Greek. Lat.— Latin. Ital.— 
Italian, etc. 

gr.— Grain. 

h. or hr.— Hour. 

H. M.S.— Her Majesty's Service, or 
Ship. 

H.R.H.-His (or Her) Royal High- 
ness. 



m/s.— Months after sight. 

Mem. (Lat. .a/ewK/ito).— Remem- 
ber. Memorandum. 

1110.— Month. 

M. P. —Member of Parliament. 

M3S. — Manuscripts. 

Mus.B. (Lat. Musicce Dacca- 
/aiweMs).— Bachelor of Music. 

Mus.D. (Lat. MuaiccB Doctor).— 
Doctor of Music. 

N.B (Lat. Nota 6e«e).— Mark well; 
take notice. 

N.B.— North Britain (i.e., Scot- 
hind). 

N.D.— No date. 

neiii. con. (Lat. nemine contra- 
d/ceuie).— No one contradicting. 

No. (Lar. iVftme, o).— Number, 

N.P.— Notary Public. 

ob. (Lat. ubiit).— Died. 

Obs.— Obsolete. 



O.H.I 
Vice. 



-On Her Majesty's Ser- 



WORDS OP TRUTH. 

are to be true, nothing can need a lie, 
fault which needs it must grow two thereby 

HEBBERr. 



lb. or Ibid. (Lat. Ibidem).— In the 

same place. 
Id. (Lit. /(;e-/().— The same, 
i.e. (Lar. id est)-— That is. 
I. U.S. (Lat. Jesus Iloiivinum Sal- 

raio?-). —Jesus the Saviour of 

Men. 
in. —Inch. 

Incog. (Ital. Incognito). — Un- 
known. 
Inf. (Lat. /»j/rrt).— Below, 
inst. — Instant ; the present 

month. 
I.O.U.— I owe you. 
J.P.-Justice of the Peace. 
K.B.— Knight of the Bath. 
K.C.B.— Knight Commander of 

the Bath. 
K.C.M.G.— Knight Commander of 

St. Michael and St. George. 
K.C.S. I.— Knight Commander of 

the Star of India. 
K.G.— Knii-'ht of the Garter. 
Kilos.— Kilogrammes. 
K.T.— Knight of the Thistle. 
L. or Li 5. (Lat. Liber).— Boo\i. 
Lat.— Latitude. 

lb. (Lrit. libra).— Vound (weight). 
L/C— I,etter of Credit. 
L.D.— Lady Day. 
LL.B. (Lat. Legum Baccalaureus). 

bachelor of Laws. 
LL.D. (Lat. Legum Doctor).— 

Doctor of Laws. 
Lon. or Long.— Longitude. 
L.R.C.P.— Licentiate of the Royal 

College of Ph.vsicians. 
L.R.C.S.— Licentiate of the Royal 

College of Surgeons. 
L. s. d. {Lat. Librm, solidi, denarii). 

-Pounds, shillings, pence, 
m.— Mile, Minute. 
M.A. or A.M. (Lat. Artium 

Magisier).— Master of Aris. 
M.B. (Lat. Medicince Dacca- 

;((./M-e?<s).— Bachelor of Medicine. 
M.D. (Lat. Medicinoe Doctor),— 

Doctor of Medicine, 
m/d.— Months after date. 



oz.— Ounce. 
I_ P.- Page. Pp.— Pages. 
P.A. — Power of Attor- 
ney. 
P.C.— Privy Councillor, 
per ann. (Lar. per an- 
num). — By the year, 
per cent. (Lat. per cev- 

t(t))i).— By thehund.ed. 

1— per pro or pp.— By pro- 

' curatiou. 

Ph.D. (Lat. PhilosophicB Doctor).— 

Doctor of Phiosophy. 
Piiix. (Lat. Piiixu).—'H.e painted 

it. 
P.M. (Lat. Post meridiem).— After- 
noon. 
p.ii. — promispory note. 
P.O.- Post OHlce. 
P.O.O.— Post Office Order. 
P.P.O. (Fr. Pour prendre conu^).— 

To take leave ; to say good-bye. 
pro forma.— As a matter of loini. 
pro teiu. (Lat. pro tempore).— 

For the time, 
prox.— Next month. 
P.S. (Lat. Post scriptum).— Post- 
script. 
P. T.O.— Please turn over, 
q. or qy.— Query or (Question. 
Q.C.— (Queen's Counsel, 
qn— quarter, 
q.s. (Lat. quantum sufficit).— As 

much as is sunicient. 
q.v. (Lat. quod vide).— 'Wbic]\ see. 
K. (Lat. Hex It gina).— King or 

Queen. 
R. (Lat.. iJecf'pe).- Take. 
R.A.-— Royal Academician. Royal 

Artillery. 
R.E.— Royal Engineers. 
Reed.— lleceived. 
Recr.— Receipt. 
Retd.— Returned. 
R.I. P. (Lat. Requicscat in pace!). 

—May he rest in peace ! 
R.S.V.P. (Fr. Rcpondez s'il vans 

plait).— Answer please, 
seq. or sq. (Lat. sequens). —The 

following, 
sq. ft., etc.— Square foot, etc. 
sup. (Lat. SM^^ra).- Above, 
ult. (Lat. ultimo r,iense).—In the 

last month, 
v. (LHt. versus).— AgSLinst. 
v. or vid. (Lat. vide).— See. 
viz. (Lat. videlicet).— NsLmely. 
v/t.— Weight. 

xd.— Without the dividend. 
4 to.— Quarto. 



LAW SITTINGS, ECLIPSES, AND MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



INTEREST TABLE. 

Without giving an elaborate 
series of tabulated figures to as- 
certain the interest clue on any 
gi ven suiu at Hi 3, 5, or any other 
r.ite per cent., any person may cal- 
culate for himself the amount of 
interest by a very simple process. 
The amount of interest upim one 
pound for every month ai 5 per 
cent, is one penny. Having ;is- 
certained what any given sum 
amounts to at 5 per cent., dtlier 
rates may be calculated by adding 
to, or dividing it, thus: q months. 
5percent.for£80wouldbe£2 
2i per cent., which is one- 
half 1 

B per cent, is six-tenths ..140 
SJper cent, is seven-tenths 1 8 
4 per cent, is four-flfths .. 1 12 
If the interest should be more 
than 5 per cent., then the extra 
rate of interest must be added. 
Thus for 6i per cent, add one- 
fourth ; for 7^ per cent, add one- 



RECISTRATION OF BIRTHS, &C. 

In Enijlniid an infant must bo 
registered wilhm lorty-tvvo days 
of Its birth. Responsible persons 
failing to do this without reason- 
able cause l)econie liable to a 
penalty of forty shillings. 

When a death takes place, per- 
sonal information must be given 
to the registrar within five days. 
A certificate must be obtained to 
give to the clei'gyman performing 
the funeral service. 

In Scotlavd a birth must be re- 
gistered within 21 days; a mar- 
riage within three days ; and a 
death within eight days. 



TABLE TO CALCULATE WAGES, &C. 


Tr. 


Pr.Mnth. 


Pr. Week. 


Pr.Day. 


■F 


£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


B. d. 


1 


I 8 


4* 


03 




3 4 


9| 


if 


.S 


5 


1 li 


2 


4 


6 8 


1 6l 


2.i 


.5 


8 4 


1 11 


3i 


6 


10 


2 33 


4 


7 


11 8 


2 8i 


4.J 
5k 


8 


13 4 


3 OJ 
3 5.1 


9 


15 


6 


10 


16 8 


3 10 


64 


11 


18 4 


4 2 


7k 


1-J 


1 


4 7 


8 


J a 


1 1 8 


4 U 


8§f 


14 


1 3 4 


5 4 


15 


1 5 


5 9 


10 


l(i 


1 6 8 


6 1| 

6 6; 

6 10 
7 3i 


lOJ 


17 


1 8 4 


111 


IS 


1 10 


111 


19 


1 11 8 


1 Oi 


20 


1 13 4 


7 8 


1 li 


HO 


2 10 


11 6 


1 7| 


40 


3 6 8 


15 4J 


2 2} 


50 


4 3 4 


19 2 


2 9 


60 


5 


1 3 


3 3i 


70 


5 16 8 


1 6 10 


3 10 


80 


6 13 4 


1 10 8 


4 4} 


90 


7 10 


1 14 7 


4 111 


100 


8 6 8 


1 18 5i 


5 53 



If the Wages be Guineas instead 
of Pounds, for esrh Guinea add 
Id. u> eai^h Mtinth.or ^d. to earh 

Week. 



LAW SITTINGS, 1899. 

End 



Begin 
Hilary Sittings Jan. 11 
Easter do. Apr. U 
Trinity do. May 30 
Michaelmas do. Oct. 24 



May 19 
Aug. 12 
Dec. 21 



PRINCIPAL ARTICLES OF 

THE CALENDAR FOR 

THE YEAR 1899. 

Golden Number, 19 ; Epact, 18 ; 
Solar Cycle, 4; Dominical Let- 
ter, A ; Roman Indiction, 12 ; 
Julian Period (year of), 6612. 



FIXED AND MOVABLE 
FESTIVALS, ANNIVER- 
SARIES, &c. 

Epiphany Jan. 6 

Septuagesima Sunday .. „ 29 
Quinquagesima — Shrove 

Sunday Feb. 12 

Ash Wednesday „ 15 

Quadragesima— 1st S. in 

Lent „ 19 

St. David Mar. 1 

St. Patrick „ 17 

Annunciation— Lady Day „ 25 

Palm Sunday „ 26 

Good Friday „ 31 

Easter Sunday Apr. 2 

Low Sunday „ 9 

St.George „ 23 

Rogation Sunday May 7 

Ascension D.—holi/ Thurs. „ 11 
Pentecost— Whit Sunday • . „ 21 
Birth of (jueen Victoria.. „ 24 

Trinity Sunday „ 28 

Corpus Christi June 1 

Accession of t>>. Victoria.. „ 20 

Proclamation „ 21 

St. John Bapt.— Mids. Day „ 24 
St. Michael.— Michael. Day Sept. 29 
Binh of Prince of Wales Nov. 9 

St. Andrew „ 30 

First Sunday in Advent • ■ Dec. 3 

St. Thomas „ 21 

Christmas Day „ 25 



FOREIGN EPOCHS. 

The year 5660 of the Jewish Era 
commences on September5, 1899. 

Ramadan (Month of Abstinence 
observed by the Turks) com- 
mences on January 13, 1899. 

The year 1317 of the Moham- 
medan Era commences on May 
12, 1899. 



ECLIPSES IN 1899. 

In the year 1899 there will be 
three Eclipses of the Sun and 
two of the Moon :— 

Jai. 11-12.— A Partial Eclipse of 
the Sun, invisible at Greenwich. 

./'itne 8.— A Partial Eclipse of the 
Sun, visible at Greenwich. 

June 23.— A Total Eclipse of the 
Moon, invisible at Greenwich. 

Dec. 2-3.— An Annular Eclipse of 
the Sun, invisible at Gr^^^nvrich. 

Dec. 16-17.— A Partial Eclipse of 
the Moon, visible al Greenwich. 



ENGLISH QUARTER DAYS. 

These are— Lady Day, March 25; 
Midsummer, June 24; Michael- 
mas, September 29; and Christ- 
mas, December25. Quarterly trade 
accounts are made up to the end 
of the months of March, June, 
September, and December. 



SCOTCH QUARTER DAYS. 

Candlemas, February 2; Whit- 
sunday, May 15 ; Lammas, August 
1 ; and Martinmas, November ii. 
The Removal Terms in Scotch 
Burghs are May 28, November 28. 



BANK HOLIDAYS. 

In England and Ireland.— FjHSter 
Monday, the Monday in Whitsun 
week, first Monday in August, 26th 
day of December (or 27tli should 
the 26th be a Sunday). 

In Scotland.— New Year's Day, 
Christmas Day (if either of tlie 
above days falls on a Sunday, 
the following Monday shall be a 
Bank Holiday), Good Friday, first 
Monday in May, first Monday in 
August. 



INFECTIOUS DISEASES 

Where an inmate of any build- 
ing used for human habitation is 
suffering from an infectious 
disease, the head of the family, 
and in his default the nearest 
relatives of the patient present 
in the building or being in attend- 
ance on the patient, and in 
default of such relatives every 
person in charge of or in attend- 
ance on the patient, and in 
default of any such ijorson the 
occupier of the building, shall, as 
soon as he becomes aware that 
the patient is suffering from an 
infectious disease, send notice 
thereof to the medical officer of 
health of the district. 

Every medical practitioner at- 
tending on the patient shall send 
to the medical officer of health 
for the district a certificate stat- 
ing the infectiims- disease from 
which the patient i« suffering. 

Every person required to give 
notice, who fails ■ to- give the 
same, shall beliable an summary 
conviction to aflnenot exceeding 
forty shillings. 

The following diseases are 
included : small - pox, cholera, 
diphtheria, membranous croup, 
erysipelas, the disease known as 
scarlatina or scarlet fevir, and 
the fevers known by any of 
the following names — typhus, 
typhoid, enteric, relapsing, con- 
tinued, or puerperal, and includes 
as respects any particular district 
any infectious disease to which 
Che Act has been apiilied by the 
local authority. 



STAMPS, TAXES, LICENCES, EXCISE DUTIES^,. &c. 



Not exceeding. 



blit not 



BILL STAMPS. 

£ s. d. 
5 .. 1 
10 .. 2 

75 J V 100 .. 1 

And every additional £lOO, or frac- 
tion of £100— is. 

Days op Grace.— Bills of Ex- 
•change or Promissory Notes pay- 
able at any time after date liave 
tliree days of grace allowed— thus, 
a bill dated Jan. 1 at two months' 
date is not due tillMarch 4 ; but no 
days of grace are allowed on Bills 
at sight, or on demand. 

Bills falling due on Bank Holi- 
days are payable the day after ; 
those falling due on Sunday, Good 
Friday, or Christmas Day, must 
be paid the day before. 



RECEIPTS AND CHEQUES. 

Receipt for the payment of 
£2 or upwards Id. 

(Persons receiving the money to 

pay the duty. 
'P«nalty(&5rgivingai-eceipt, liable 
to duty^not duly stamped.. £10 
The person giving the receipt 
shall, before the instrument be 
delivered out of his hands, ob- 
literate the stan:p by writing his 
Name or Initials, tor/ether loith the 
trite date of liis sotn-itinq, so as to 
show clearly and distinctly that 
such stamp has been used. 

CHEQUES. 

Bankers' Cheques Id. 



PATENT (LETTERS) FOR INVEN- 
TIONS. 

On application for patent £10 
Complete specification .. 3 

Every patent is granted for the 
term of 14 years from the date of 
application, subject to the pay- 
ment before the expiration of the 
fourth and each succeeding year 
during the term of the patent, of 
the prescribed fee. The patentee 
may vo-V ^'^^ ivhole or any portion 
of the aggregate of such prescribed 
annual fees in advance. 
Before the expiration of 
the 4th year from date 

ofpatent £5 

5th year 6 

6th „ 7 

7tli „ 8 

Sth „ 9 

9tli , 10 

10th „ 11 

11th , 12 

:2th „ 13 

13th „ 14 

Pot additional particulars, see 
the "Circular of Information" 
issued by the Patent Ofiace. 



SPOILED STAMPS. 

All applications for allowance 
must be made within six months 
from the time of spoilage of un- 
executed instruments, or within 
six months of tbe date or of the 
first execution of others. 



INCOME TAX, 

Schedule C, D, and E, 6d. in the 
pound. 
Incomes under £160 exempt; 
those under £400 allowed a deduc- 
tion of £160; those between £400 
and £.500 a deduction of £150; 
beticeeii £500 and £600 a deduction 
of £120; between £600 and £700 a 
deduction of £70. 



LICENCES, EXCISE DUTIES, &C. 

Ai)praiser's & HouseAgt's. 

United Kingdom — £2 

ArmorialBearingsGt.Brit. 1 1 

„ on a Carriage, do. 2 2 

Arms,grantof,stampdty. 10 

Auctioneer's Anl. Licence 

United Kingdom 10 

Banker's Annual Licence, 

United Kingdom 30 

Beer and Wine Retailer's 4 
Beer and Wine not con- 
sumed on the premises 3 
Beer not drunk on the 

premises (England) ..150 
Beer drunk on premises 3 10 
Brewers' Licences :— 

Brewer of beer for sale 10 
Dogs,anykind,Gt.Britain 7 6 
„ Ireland, one dog — 2 6 
„ Every addl. dog 2 
Game Licences (U.K."):— 
If taken out after 31st 
July and before 1st No- 
vember, to expire on 
31st July following .. 3 
After 31st July, expire 

31st October 2 

After 3lst October, ex- 
pire 31st July 2 

Gamekeeper's (Gt. Brit.) 2 
Game Dealer's L'ce. (U.K.) 2 
Gun or Pistol Licence •- 10 
Marriage Licence,Special, 

England and Ireland 5 
„ not special 10 

Medicine(Patent)Dealer's, 

Gt. Brit., annl. licence 5 
Passenger Vessels, on 
board which liquors 
and tobacco are sold, 

one year 5 

„ „ one day ..100 

Pawnbroker's 7 10 

Publican's (U. K.) licence 
to sell spirits,beer,and 
wine to be consumed 
on the premises:— 
If rated under £10 
15 
» » 20 

» 1. 25 

» 30 

» 11 40 

,. » 50 

„ „ 100 

And £5 for each addi- 
tional £100 up to £60. 
Servants- Annual Licence 
for every Male Ser- 
vant in Great Britain 15 
Tobacco&SnulI,dealersin 5 3 

Tea. customs duty 4 

Voting Paper 1 

Warrant for Goods 3 



LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANIES. 

On every £100 of Capital 

to be raised 2 



4 10 





6 








8 








11 








14 








17 








20 








25 









AGREEMENTS. &0. 

AaaitiisiENT, or Memorandum 
of Agreement, under hand only, 
of the value of £5 or more, when 
not otherwise charged, 6d. 

Difto; to let a furnished house 
for lessthan a year, the rent being 
above £2o— 2s. 6d. 
AffldaVitfS-and Declarations, 2s. 6d. 



Articles of Clerkship to Solicitor, 
in England or Ireland . . £S0 
„ for Lancashire, Durham, 
or Scotc h s uperior co urts _£_60 

~r rSTATE DUTY. 

Where the princip;U value of 
the Estate exceeds £iCOand does 
not exceed £300, 1 per cent. ; £500 
to £1,000, 2 per cent. ; £1,000 to 
£10,000, 3 per cent. : and so on up 
to £1,000,000, which is charged 
8 per cent. 

HOUSE DUTY. 

On inhabited houses oc- s. d. 
cupied as farmnouse, 
public - house, coffee- 
shop, shop, warehouse, 
or lodging-house, of the 
annual value of £20 and 
not exceeding £40.... 
Exceeding £40 and not 

exceeding £60 | «« 4 

Exceeding £60 ' " " 

Other houses of the 

annual value of £20 

and not exceeding£40 

Exceeding £40 and not 

exceeding £60 

Exceeding £60 



So 



CONVEYANCE. 

Where the purchase money s. d. 
shall not exceed £5 6 

Excdg. £5&not excdg.£10 1 o 

10 „ 15 1 6 

„ 15 „ 20 2 

20 „ 25 2 6 

For every additional £25 up 
to £300 2 6 

If exceeding £300, then for 
every £50 5 

Any kind not otherwise 
charged 10 

Conveyance or Transfer— 

Of Bank of England Stock 7 9 

Of any colonial debenture 
stock or funded debt, for 
every £100 or fractional 
part of £100 of nominal 
amount transferred 2 6 

GOVERNMENT INSURANCES AND 
ANNUITIES. 

The Postmaster-General is em- 
powered to insure the lives of 
persons of either sex for any 
amount not less than £5 or more 
than £100. 

An insurance may be effected 
by any person not over the age of 
65 years and not under the age of 
14 years, or, if the amount does 
not exceed £5, not under the age 
of 8 years. 

The Postmaster-General is also 
empowered to grant immediate 
or deferred annuities for any 
amount not less than £i or more 
than £100 to any person not under 
the age of 5 years. The amount 
payable varies with the age. 



Prize Medals 







MaCNIVEN & CAMERON'S 

RENOVSTNED PENS. 



6d and 1 - the Box. 



TURNED-UP POINTS. 



3 6 tht ftroM. 



THE WAVERLEY PEN. 



Rapid and Quill-like in action. 



THE PICKWICK PEN. 



Suitable for swift commercial writing. 



THE BIG WAVERLEY PEN. 



Softer than the Waverley, but with same 
action. 



THE FLYING SCOTCHMAN PEN. 



Broad Point ; the steel brother of the Quill. 
Flanged to retain the ink. 



THE SCOTCH EXPRESS PEN. 



Soft and flexible, flanged to retain the ink. 



THE NILE PEN. 



Firm and free, great ink capacity, 



%e"Box; SIMPLE RESERVOIR PENS. ,. .he arcs.. 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN PEN. 



Turned-up Point, Firm, writes 300 words 
with one dip of ink. 



THE FLYING **J" PEN. 



A superior "J " Pen, capable of writing 
200 words with one dip of ink. 



USSORTED BOX, CONTAINING ALL THE KINDS, 1/- EACH, 



MACNIVEN & Cameron, 

PENMAKERS TO HER MAJESTY'S GOVERNMENT OFFICES. 

Waverley Works, Blair Street, EDINBURGH, 



The}' come .as a bo(in and a blessin}^'- to men, 
The Pickwick, the Owl, and the Waverley Pen." 



PENS FOR FINE WRITING. 



THE CLAYMORE PEN. 



Round at the point, easy and strong. 
6d and 1/- the Box. 3,6 the Gross. 



THE OWL. PEN. 



Turned-down Point, perfect flexibility. 
6d and 1/- the Box. 3/6 the Gross. 



THE COMMERCIAL PEN. 



Smooth Point, strong, durable and firm. 
6d and 1/- the Box. 2/- the Gross. 



6d and 1 - 
the Box. 



PENS with OBLIQUE POINTS. t^eGSoss. 



THE HINDOO PEN NO. 1- 


SMALL HINDOO PEN NO. 1. 


FINE DEGREE, Strong, lasting Pen. 


Will fit any ordinary Penholder. 


THEfHINDOO PEN NO. 2. 


SMALL HINDOO PEN NO. 2. 


" 





MEDIUM DEGREE, Strong, lasting Pen. 


Will fit any ordinary Penholder, 


THE HINDOO PEN NO. 3. 


SMALL HINDOO PEN NO. 3. 


J R G H / 


''-^-_- '.::;^ - — r •.< 2 c w ; v e tj & c ^ m E r c n ; 


BROAD DEGREE, Strong, lasting Pen. 


Will fit any ordinary Penholder. 



ENGROSSING, NO. 1. ENGROSSING, NO. 2. ENGROSSING, NO. 3. 

6d the Box. 2 - the Gross. 6d the Box. 2 - the Gross. 6d the Box. 2 - the Gross 



8d and i- the Box. SUPERIOR "J" PENS 

Black, the Gross, 2- OUnZiXlll/JV U iTJIino. 

Gilt, Do. 3 6 

Silver Do. 3 6 



6d and 1 - the Box. 
Black, the Gross, 3/6 
Gilt, Do. 5/- 



THE *'J" PEN. 


THE BIG "J" PEN. 




^^■^h^U_ 'v/..Em»iRtiRr.H ^^^^^^H 




ilC J PEN 


1 


■ 









THE FLYING "J" PEN (See Page 7). 
6d and 1/- per Box. Black, per Gross, 5/- Gilt, per Gross, 7 6. 



MACNIVEN & CAMERON'S PENS 



COMMERCIAL AND SCHOOL SERIES. 



O.A. 



PEN. 



The Gross. 



m 2/- 




O.B. 
PEN. 



O.L. 



^ 21- 



^^m 



2/6 



PEN. 



O.C. 



PEN. 



O.M. 






2/6 



PEN. 



(Silvered.) 



O.D. 



ij fefea 



1/6 



PEN. 
O.E. 

I PEN. 



O.F 




O.O. 



PEN. 



1/- 




MACNIVEN & CAMERON^S PENS 



COMMERCIAL AND SCHOOL ^EBIE^— Continued. 



BANK PEN. 



Fine, No. i. Medium, No. 2. 
6d the Box. 1/6 the Gross. 



CORRESPONDENCE PEN. 



Fine, No. I. Medium, No. 2. Broad, No. 3. 
6d the Box. 1/6 the Gross. 



SCHOOL BOARD PEN. 



EDIN BURGH M 

Fine, Medium and Broad. 
1/6 the Gross. 



COLLEGE AND SCHOOL PEN. 



Fine, Medium and Broad. 
16 the Gross. 



GLOBE SCHOOL PEN. 



Fine, Medium and Broad. 
6d the Box. 1'6 the Gross. 



CITY PEN. 



Fiire or Medium. 
1/- the Gross. 



RED INK PEN. 
the Box. _^^ -'^. ^ f^^W 2 6 the Gross. 

Made of Non-Corrodible Metal and Gold Coated. 



1 - per Box. 



BARREL PENS. 



THE BARREL "J" PEN. 



aARPlEL J PEN 

MACNtVEN & CAiVEE 



Raven Black, Quill-like action. 



1/- per Box. 



BROAD ARROW PEN. 




Turned-up Point, Firm, yet easy. 



THE NEW ACT REOA;iDni{] ESTATE OUTY. 



xVx alteration of considerable importance in our 
■^rsterii of taxntion— in the shape of a revision of 
r e PAistiiiLj death <Uities — was proposed by Sir 
William Harcourt in introducing his Budget on 
ilit^ I'ith of April, 1804, and became law on the 
list iii'.Tnlv. It occupied the principal portion 
ui the Fiiiaiiee Act, 1804 [57 & 58 Vict. ch. 30]. 

[n consequence of this alteration the existing 
jiriibnte, aci">unt, estate, and succession duties 
cease to e^■is^, and in their place a new duty, 
kiio'.vn ns Estate Dutv, is levied upon theprinci- 
jial wa'ne on all piopni'ty wliich passes on the 
de;ith of the owiinr, whether that property is 
real "Y personal, st't; led or niis-ettlcd. 

The chief iimvisions relaMi;^ to Estate Duty 
aveasf,ilh-ws:— 
i rropertynut"ft.!ie United Kingilom. — Property 
passing on the diath of the deceased when 
sitiiate out of the united Kingdom is includeil 
i^rdy, if, under the law in force before the i^ass- 
ing of this Act, le.^acy or succession duty was 
payalile in respert fl-.eri.'of, or would have been 
payable but for the relationship of the person 
to wlioin it p;issed. 

Silt'eil. /'/■!)/.('/«//.— Where property in respect 
of which Estate Duty is leviable, is settled by 
the will of tlie deceiised, or having been settled 
by some other disposition iiasses under that dis- 
position on the (b-;ith of tiie deceased to some 
P'-i-<on not coi'ipi^tent to(',is]iose of the ]iropertv, 
M fi ither Estate Dutv (called Settlement Estate 
Dnty) on the ■r)r!nei])al value of the settled 
pi'MpevTA- is lex-ied at the rite hereinafter speei- 
lied, except wliei'e tile mly life interest ui the 
pro] e'tv aftei the deatli of' the de-eased is that 
of a w lie or liushand of the deci'ased ; but during 
the continuauoti of the, sfcttleuient the Settle- 
ment Estate Duty is not to be payable more 
ill, in once.. 

.( 'ollcctUni and liecnvery of Estate Duty. — Where 
tlie executor of the dei-eased does not know the 
amount Of value of any pvo'perty whicli has 
passiai on the ileath, he may stale in the Inland 
Keveiine afiidavit that such pmijerty exists but 
la; does not know the amount or value thereof, 
and that he uiulcitakes, as soon as the amount 
and value aie ascertained, to bring in an account 
thereof, and to jiay lioih the duty for which he 
is or may be lialile, and any further duty pay- 
al)U- by reason hereof for which he is or may 
he liable in i-es])ect of the other property men- 
tioned in the a!:i,iavit. Estate Duty, so' far as 
nor, i)aid by the executor, is to be coliectetl upon 
an account setting foi-th the particulars of the 
[)ro| eity, and delivered to the Conunissicmers 
^ti;at is to say, the Commissioners of Inland 



Revenue) witliiu six months after the death bv 
tlie pt^i-.sou accountaVile for the duty, or wind.i 
such furtlier time as the Commissioners may 
allow. 

RcascnaMe Allotuances. — In determinin:.^ the 
value of an estate for the pui'pose of Estate Dutv, 
allowance is to he made for reasonable funeral 
exiien.ses, a,nd for delits and encumlirances, etc. 

Estinvded Value. — The principal value of any 
property is to be estimated to be tiie priiie 
whi(;h, in the opinion of the Commissioners, 
sui^li property would fetch if sold in the open 
market; at the time of the death of the deceased. 

CnMs of Fahtation. — Where the Commissioners 
require a valuation to be made by a jierson 
named b',- theni, the reasouable costs of such 
valnaiioM are itefr ived by tlu^ Commissioners. 

Po.-<tr<i„nl raniiient. — Where the Commis- 
sioners ai-e satished that the Estate Duty h* viable 
in respect of any property cannot -withcmt ex- 
cessi\-e sacrifice be raised at once, they may 
allow pavment to be postjioueil for such i>eriod, 
to such extent,, and on payment of such interest 
not exceeding four per cent, or any higher 
interest yielded by the property, and on such 
terms, as the Commissioners t,hink fit. 

I)h the Case of Over-payment. — Where it is 
proved to the sntisfaction of the Commissioners 
that too much Estate Duty has been paid, the 
excess is to be repaid by them, and in cases 
where the over-payment was due to over valua- 
tion by the Commissioners, with interest at 
three per cent, per annum 

Payment bij Stamps or OtJiervnse. — The Estate 
Duty maybe collected by means of stamps or 
such other means as the Conunissioners pre- 
scribe. 

Vor any who, are not Satisfied.— Any person 
aggrieved by the decision of tiie Commissioners 
with respect to the repayment of any ex(;ess of 
duty paid, or by the amount of duty claimed by 
the Cominissioners, whether on the ground of 
the value of any property or the rate charged or 
otherwise, may, on payment of, or giving security 
for, the iluty claimed by the Commis.sioners or 
such portion of it as is then payable by him, 
appeal to the High Court within the time and in 
the manner and on the conditions'directed by 
rules of Court, and the amount of duty is to be 
determined by the High Court, and if the duty 
as determined is less than that paid to the 
Commissioners the excess is to be repaid to the 
person complaining. 

Socde of Rates of Estate Duty. — The rates of 
Estate Duty are according to the following 
scale ; — 



Where 


the Principal Value of the Estate 


Estate Duty sh.all he Payable 
at the Rate per cent, of 


Exceeds 


£ £ 
luo and does not exceed 500 


One pound. 


„ 


50(.) „ 


, 


1,000 


Two pounds. 


„ 


1,000 „ 




10,000 


Three pounds. 


„ 


10,000 „ 




25,000 


Four pounds. 




'.'5,000 „ 


J, 


50, (JIM 


Four pounds ten shillings. 


„ 


50,000 „ 


„ 


75,000 


Five pounds. 




75,000 „ 


,t 


100,000 


Five pounds ten shillings. 




100,000 „ 


„ 


150,000 


Six pounds. 


„ 


150,000 „ 


„ 


250,000 


Six pounds ten shiUimgs. 


„ 


•J50,0nij „ 


„ 


500,000 


Seven pounds. 


'; 


500.!)! 10 ,, 
1,000,UOO 


" 


1,000,000 ^ 


Seven pounds ten shillings. 
Bight pounds. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



The PJl PER of TO-DJqY. 



The New 

Smooth. 
Ivory. 

Double Thick. 



This New Paper is pure white, has an exquisite 
surface, and is perfectly smooth on both sides. 

It is made from the purest materials, giving it a 
most delicate touch; while the improved machinery 
by which it is made, and the enormous production, 
enable it to be sold at a moderate price 



! 



IS per 5-Quire (120 sheets) Packet Court Shape 
Envelopes to suit, is per 100. 

See that each Sheet has the Water-mark, 
" The NE W SMOOTH IVOR K" 

LoNDOx AND Glasgow: 

WM. COLLINS, SONS, & Co., Ltd, 



WHEN A MAN DIES WITHOUT LEAVING A WILL 
HOW IS HIS PROPERTY DIVIDED? 

The follo-wing are the Rales by which the Personal Estates of EnsUsh Persons, ani the Movable Estates of 
i, otch Persons dying without leaving a will, are distributed. No 7tearer relations are iUpp sed to exist thaf 
ffiosc »»... •!< d. Where an asterisk (*) is pref.xed the regulation applies only to Scotland. 

It is to Oe. ^^......-■'•'d that by the Intestates Estates Act (33 and 54 Vict. c. 29) a very important alte.raticn has beef* 

recently made in the iu,uu .,c ■^e^ards provisions for widows oj tnen who die intestate, ond witlioitt issue, after 
1st September, 1890; it is enacttc .'"^atH the real and personal estate together do not exce^ d £'50 , the whole is 
^ to yn to the, widow ; if it exceeds ^5ov,, 'he widow is to have a charge on both proportion -.tely tor ^500. The pro- 
vision is to be in addition to her share of tii». residue. This does not apply to Scotland. 

If the Intestate die, leaving: His repreiefitatives take in the proportion following : — 

, Wife on'y, no blood relations Half to v ife, olhei lialf to the Cro»n. 

Wife, no near re'ations . i "?"" '° " «• '**'* ."^ next-of-lcin in equal degree to 

» intestaie, or the r lej-.il represenr tives. 

I One-third to wife, rest to c hild or c' ildren ; and if 
I children are dead, then to the representatives (.that is, 
Wife and child, or children, and children of a deceased ^ the.'r lineal da cendants). 

clhld > *One-third to wife ; one-third to living: children in pqnal 

shares; one-ihird equally anio g iivin^; chii'.atm per 
\ capita and issue of dead children /^r stirpes. 
Wife and father .. .. ».,.«», .. Half to wfe, and half to father. 

( Hilf o wife, ai d half to mother. 

Wife and mother „ ». ,. ..\ *H? If to wife; one-sixth to moclier, two-sixths to Crown 

I, failing kin. 

I Half to wife, one-fourth to livi' g broth -r or s'st 'r. one- 
Wife, brother, or sister and children of a deceased J fourth to deceased brother's'' r sister ■- chi dr-i . 

brother or sister j *Half to wife ; one-sixth to brother, two- ixths e ,ua ly 

\ among children of dead brother or sist- r 

( Half to wife, one-fourth to mother, and (jt:ior fouith to 

Wife, mother, nephews, and nieces \ ^^^t^l^t^^^J^ ^'^^^, t.o-sixths among 

\ nephews and mec&sper stirpes. 

, Half to wife, residue to mother, brother, sisters, and 

'^'^^rfVTil'^J'v>''?v!''^'''' T^^?' "^^ "'^'^•^ (cluldrenof J *Half?o wife; one-sixth to mother, two sixths among 

deceased brothers and sisters ^ the brothers and sisters (who take /^r ^a/^Va). and 

the nieces who take /frj^jV/^J. 

No wife or child _ All to next-of-kin and their legal repre'cutativ'--. 

All children ec\^3\\y per capita , issue of deceased child- 
ren per stirpes ; no difference be.weeu cUildren of 
different wives. 
«One half equally amongst all living children : the othe» 



half equally amongst living children per capita, ai'd 
issue of dead children /er stirpes. 

Husband and children Whole to husband. 

., ,, , ^ .. ..,.-. ,. , f The whole to mother. 

Mother but no wife, child, father, brother, sister. J ■*One-third to mother; two-thirds to the Crown failing 
nephew, or niece I kji, " 

Mother and brother ....«„ ^ ••{ *MTiher* one-third; brother two-thirds. 

( Whole to thein equally. 
Mother, and brothers and sisters ^ »• .. ..\ *Mother one-third; brothers and sisters two-thirds 

I equally ^^r capita. 
i Whole to father. 
Father, and brothers and sisters .. »« m ,,\ *One-lialf to father, the other half equally amjngst 

I brothers and sisters per capita. 
I Half to child, half to grandchild, who takes by renri^ 

■^hild and grandchild by deceased child "{ sentation. 

I. *Three-fourths to child, one-fourth to grandchild. 
T*" no child, children, or representatives of them .. .. All to next-of-kin hi equal degree to intest.nti- 

• ther or si ter, and children of a decea ed brother or / Half to brother or sister per capita, half to ihinirei' cf. 

J. SNter \ deceased brother or sister /eri-ZiV/M. 

r 'ther and grandfathr-r Whole to brother. 

f th r's grandson, aiul brother or sister's daughter . . All to daughter. 

oro her =)nd two aunts All to brother. 

Br .iher and wife Half to brother, half to wife. 

Or ui'If'th r, no nearer relation All to grandfather. 

Father's father, and mothers mother Equally to both. 

, . , f All to grandmother. 

randmotner, uncle, or aunt t 'All to uncle or aunt if paternal 

iJncle, and deceased uncle's child 



Uncle_by mother's side, and deceased uncle or aunt's / ^^^ji'd^T'^Jl-.eased rat.rn d uncle or aur. 

L elusion of mate' iiai uncle. 

Two „unt. nephew, and niece { 42;5h'i^'a°n^";,i.ce. 

Uacies or aunt's children, and brother's or sister's/ Equa ly to pll. 

t^raridchildren ■( *Brotlier's or Msier's grjndcliilditn. 

N'euhew by brother, and nephew by half-sister .. •• { *AnTo'r/7)evv"'b'''hrnthpr 

.\'e|ih-v\ ,b, deceased brother, and nephews and nlec«!S J Each in e^uai ^\\m^^ per L.ipila, and ii^ t V 

by deceased sister \ *The same. 

'SO-m.— I er capita, that is, taking hldWdually and not by 'epreseutation Ptr ^tirprr ts,-»t k th,-. 
fcod not in their own rights. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



CHARLES WAGSTAFF, 

Begs to intimate to the Inhabiiants ot ])alevEITH and SUR- 
ROUNDING District that be supplies 

New Milk and Cream Three Times Daily, 
Country Egg's Regularly. 



Newmills and Elmfield Place, Dalkeith. 




SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRIES. 

TRY 

MOHCRIEFF'S 
INKS. 

UNRIVALLED I'OR QUALITY. 
Sold by J. GARMENT, 67 High Street, Dalkeith 



THOMAS STEADMAN, ' 

BILL-POSTER, 

m mmm simisi,, ^MMmmm. 

Bills and Circulars Posted & Delivered in Town & Country. 
PRIVATE STATIONS IN DALKEITH & iSEIGHBOURHOOD. 



ABVERTlSEMEIMTb 



Glass, China & Earthenware Merchant, 

33 High Street, Dalkeith, 

Returns thanks for the hberal patronage received since 
commencing Business, and begs to intimate that she has on 
hand a Well-Selected Stock of 

GLASS. CHIMA & EARTHENWARE- 

The Stock comprises — Breakfast, Dinner, Dessert and Tea Services, Toilet and 
Trinket Sets, Fire-Proof China Art Vases, &;c. Parties supplied with 
Goods on Hire. Table Decorations and Tea Sets a Speciaity. 



Inspection respectfully Invited. 



THE -'DALKEITH" 

FUNERAL UNDERTAIOTG 

AND 

POSTING ESTABLISHMENT 

FUNERALS coaductcd to bait all Classes in Town and 

Countr3\ 

COFFINS, HEARSES, MOURNING COACHES, 

And every Funeral Requiste supplied on the Shortest iNotice 

at Moderate Terms. 

CLOSE AND OPEN CARRIAGES FOR HIRE. 

JAMBS HAIQ & SONS, 

CROFT STREET, DALKEITH. 



At)VERTISE:MENtS 



AUOTIONE3ER AND VALUATOK, 

FURNITURE and OTBER EFFFXT-; oxpose.l for 
Public Sale, or Bought and Sold Privately to ai y am jiint 
Orders for New & Second-Hand Furniture carefully attended to. 

UNDERTAKING in all its Branches. 

Furniture Stores, North Wynd, Dalkeith, 



N. and J. BUCHAN, Proprietors. 



VIEWS OF DALKEITH 

& NEIGHBOURHOOD. 



J. CAJEIMBNT, 

67 High Street, Dalkeith, I 

Would respectfully invite attention to this % 

Department of his business. By his special 
request a large number of New Views have 
been taken recently by 
Messrs Valentine & Sons, Ltd., Dundee, 



J.C. has also a large number of Views by 
Messrs W. Wilson & Co. Ltd., Aberdeen, 
both Scraps and Mounted. 



tHE LIVfc AND DEA:^ WttlGHT OF $HEEF>. 

I convcnie^it means o ascertaining^ the dead weight of sheep. 
LiTC U'e'\'ht ft r/u .S"".;- leduct die estimated weight of the 
ju\ce and any extraneous matter adltering ckereio, and seeli in the table for the remainder 
only. When ^vcirked ivitliput being Jasted, deduct either from the Live or Bead Weighty if 
half fat, T per cent. ; if moderately fat, er cent.; if extra fat, 3 per cent. 



In the folloiving table vie have 
Wlien usinzit. /'orir ^he i:ros: 





Dead Weight. 


W X 


De/ 


u Wkight. 


> 


Dead Weight. 


Ha'f 


Mod. 


Extra 


Half 


Mod. 


Extra 


►4 5 


Half 


Mod. 


Extra 


"■^ 


Fat. 


iat. 


Fat. 




Fat. 


Fat. 


Fat. 


> 


Fat. 


Fat. 


Fat. 


S K's. 


lbs 


U.S. 


I'lS. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


1 8o 


43 


48 


54 


124 


66 


75 


84 


I 8 


90 


102 


114 


r ^^ 


44 


50 


55 


126 


:>6 


76 


85 


170 


91 


IC3 


"1 


i S4 


45 


51 


57 


128 


09 


78 


87 


172 


92 


104 


116 


3 86 


46 


52 


58 


130 


70 


79 


88 


174 


93 


106 


riS 


W 88 


47 


53 


59 


132 


71 


80 


89 


176 


95 


107 


119 


90 


48 


54 


6. 


134 


72 


81 


91 


178 


90 


108 


121 


92 


49 


S^ 


62 


136 


73 


82 


92 


180 


97 


109 


122 


94 


50 


57 


63 


^38 


74 


84 


93 


182 


98 


III 


123 


96 


51 


58 


65 


140 


75 


8s 


95 


184 


99 


112 


123 


98 


52 


59 


60 


142 


77 


86 


96 


186 


100 


"3 


126 


100 


34 


60 


63 


14* 


77 


87 


97 


188 


lOI 


114 


127 


102 


55 


62 


69 


T46 


7S 


89 


99 


190 


102 


"5 


129 


104 


■■0 


63 


70 


148 


79 


yo 


100 


192 


103 


117 


130 


106 


57 


64 


72 


l^O 


81 


91 


102 


194 


104 


118 


131 


108 


5'^ 


65 


73 


152 


82 


92 


103 


196 


105 


119 


133 


no 


59 


f-7 


74 


154 


83 


93 


104 


198 


106 


120 


134 


112 


60 


68 


76 


m6 


84 


95 


TOO 


200 


108 


122 


136 


114 


61 


69 


77 


158 


8S 


90 


107 


202 


109 


123 


^37 


116 


62 


70 


78 


if^o 


86 


97 


108 


204 


no 


124 


138 


118 


63 


71 


80 


162 


87 


98 


no 


206 


III 


125 


140 


120 


64 


73 


81 


164 


88 


100 


III 


208 


112 


126 


14X 


122 




74 


82 


166 


8j 


lot 


iia 


246 


129 


146 1 163 



HOW TO FORETELL THE WEATHER. 

The undernoted Table, the result oj fjtany years of observation, will be found to be wonderfully 
accurate, but ii i::us' not be forgotten that there are many influencing causes which will dc 
range the ensuing ivcuJu'r and upset any predictions. 



New and Full Moon. 



? 



If it be a new or full nioon, or 
the moon entering n.iu ilie 
first or last quarter at noon, 
or between 12 and 2 . 

2 and 4 afternoon . 

4 — 6 evening 



6 — 


8 


evening 


8 — 


10 


ev- ning 


10 — 


12 


nis.;lil 


12 — 


2 


morning 


2 — 


4 


morning 


4 — 
6 — 


6 
8 


nioruing 
niwrun g 


8 — 


10 


morning 


ID — 


12 





Changeable .... 
Fair ..... 

I lair if wind at N.W. ; rainy, 
I /; wind at S. or S. W. 

I' tto 

] ai^ 

Ditto .... 

L (lid , ivith /requent slunvers . 

Aa n . . 

\i nid and Rain . 

C hang nib, e .... 

h > t'l/ueni skoivers . 



> Snow and rain. 

Fair and mild. 
Fair. 
( Fair and frosty, if wind at N. 

\ orN.E. 

( Rain or snow, ifS, or S.W. 

Ditto. 

Fair and frosty, 
\ Hard Jrost, unless wind S. OP 
\ S. IV. 

Sno'w and stormy. 

Ditto. 

Sioriny iveathcr. 
\ Cold rain, ij wind be W, ; 
( snoiL', ij E. 

Co d, ivith high ivind. 



Measures of Length (Gui:ie'' s Chain) 
used 111 Land Survti^nig. 

7*92, or nearly 8 iuclies . . — i lini>. 

25 lim-s, 01 iq8 inchr's . . = i pt«l<r-. 

4 poles = 1 ( ii in. 

10 chains, or 7. w20 nches . — 1 unovg 

8 furlongs, or 6 ,,300 inches . = 1 ui;lc. 
^ A ch.iin IS equa tu loo links, ur 702 i lies ir 
32 yards, or 66 Icei. In ■iL.uiland ii is <rqn.i u» 
m'7q6 yards, andiu IrcUad iii s e<jual to t^ yds. 



Land Square (or Gunter's Chain) 
Measure. 



62'720 ^^quarc mchcs . 


. = 


1 S(iu ire linK. 


y ^s sqLiaie links . 


. = 


I square fu t. 


2u f.O/ ,, 


. ~ 


1 square xicid. 


02- ,, 


• = 


. ^-.luare ,.. 1 . 


lo.onr, 


. = 


1 SI in ire < hain. 


d -, qua^ie cli 'ins . 


. ~ 


1 M, uiic rooii. 


10 -q'afc cti.iinS 


, = 


I sqn.ire acrt ,, 


64U ii^utue acres 


ts 


1 sv^oiue uui<( 



ADVERTISEMEKTS 



]f%!: "f^ ^¥^ %Wf" ^ "^^ ^Of '"W^ WM° ^Kr" ^pC 

SADDLER & HARNESS MAKER, 

13 SOUTH STREET DALKEITH. 

BRANCH AT 

GOREBRIDGE. 

Every A^rticle in the Trade supplied of First-Class Quality. 

Selection of Ladies' and Gent's Hand Big<, Ti-avelling BagS; 
Poitmaoteaus, Pocket Books, Purses, Rug straps, School Bags, 
Belts, and Footballs. 

GOLF CLUBS— ALL kinds. 

Golf Balls by various makers. Golf Club Bags and other Golf 
requisites. Balls re-made and Clubs repaired on Short Notice. 

Dalkeith Jobbing Smiths' Establishment. 



Begs to intimate to the inhabitant.^ of Dalkeith and district 
that he has commenced business as a Jobbing Blacksmith in 
those premises long and successfully occupied by the late Mr 
G, Leyden and latterly by Mr Rodger, at 



28 BACK STREET. 

R. D. trusts from his long cxpeiiuice nn<l by careful and 
personal attention to the ordery entrusted him, to receive a 
share of public patronage. 

ESTIMATES FURKISHED, 
28 BACK STREET, DALKEITH, 



ADVERTISEIMENTS 



AECe. CfllSHOLM & SON, 

Pousc ■'■ Caipcutcrs •'■■ ani> ■'■■ [Inbcrtakers, 

Elrafield Place Kewmills Rd., Dalkeith. 

House a.nJ Office Jobbing- done Promptly, Efficiently, and 
Economically, by Efficient Workmen. 

Estimates and Et signs furnished on application. 

Funerals carefully condvcted on Moderate Terms. 

House — 11 High Strfet, 

WILLIAM MCLEOD, 

BREAD AND BISCUIT BAKER, 

Bread of the Finest Quality. 

SPECIAL HUNGARIAN BREAD. 

Soirees and Parties Purveyed foi;. 

Nole the Address — 

19 Mim STREET, MLiliTH* 
WILLIAM M'CARTER, 

(Late of Alex. Neilands & Co.) 

S Ha jflL 1? E H^, 

London Road, DALKEITH. 



ROOFS REPAIRED AND UPHELD BY CONTRACT 
Estimates Furnished. 

Oideis Pioniptiy Attended to in Town and Country 
Charges Moderate. 



AbVliKTl-hiVilijSTS 



Watchmakers and Jewellers, 

05 HIGH STREET, 

DALKEITH. 

IpF^VE always on hand a large and carefully-selected Stock 
^ of WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELLEEY, ELECTRO- 
PLATED GOODS, &c., of which they respectfully invite 
inspection. 

All binds of Watches. Jewellery, etc. Repaired. 
COUNTRY ORDERS PUNCTUALLY ATTENDED TO. 

THE "DALKEITH" 

Si HiiH STRIET, MLiilTH, 



Always on Hand a Good Selection of Briar and 
Meerschaum Pipes, &c. Tobacco and Cigars. 

LEITH AND DALKEITH CARRIER, 



t 



^ , i LEITH— 42 Bernard Street. 
S5u;.rters, oaLKEITH— Marchbank. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ORAPEBY ^ CHINA WAREHOUSE, 

10, 12, and 14 HIGH STREET. 



WILLIAM .THOMSON 

Holds a large Stock of First-Class Goods, bought 
ia the First Markets for cash, and sold at lowest 
Ready-Money Prices. 

The Stock is always Fresh, Fashionable 
and Up-to-Date. We visit the London Markets 
twice in the Year — beginning of each Season — 
and have always the Latest Fashions. 

Millinery, Mantle, Underclothing 
Dress Goods, Silks, Umbrellas, Furs, 

Gloves, Ribbons, Lace, Trimmings, 

General Drapery, Household Drapery, 

Carpets, Gent.'s Underclothing, Shirts, 

Ties, Fiats, and Caps, 

Dressmaking under the management of a high- 
Class Dressmaker, with a large staff of experienced 
workers, gives the utmost satisfaction. 

iviouf^nin^ and Marriage Orders cayetully executed . 

CHINA DEPARTMENT. 

A large and choice Stock of China Tea Sets, 
jjinner Sets, Table Glass, Fancy Flower 
Pots, Vases, Bedroom Ware, Kitchen 
Ware, and Dairy Requisites. 

Inspection Invited 
Country Orders Punctually attended to 



IT-TT 




-■ - 
























HIGH WATER AT LONDON BRIDGE AND 


OTHER PLACES- 


la98. 




05 

II 


January. 


February. 


March. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


TIDE CONSTANTS. | 

Tlip. opproximate timfi nn ' 
Lncal Time\ 0/ Ilioh Water 


Morn 


Aft 


Morn 


Aft 


Morn 


Ait 


Morn 


Aft 


Mom 


Aft 


Morn 1 Aft 




li.iii. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. in. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. in. 


h. m. 


h.m. 


h. ni. 


h ui. il. m. 


1 


7 59 


8 28 


9 3 


9 47 


7 7 


7 36 


8 52 


9 42 


9 28 


10 5 


10 39,11 9 


«' the follminnrj poHs mau be 


2 


8 58 


9 34 


10 32 


11 14 


8 11 


8 51 


10 26 


11 4 


10 38 


11 7 


11 38 — 


ascn-tained by nilding or , 


3 


10 11 


10 49 


11 53 


— 


9 38 


10 27 


il 35 




1135 




7 


33 


S'iblractin'i the Iimir.^ mi^i 
w,' hides siiown below to /he 


4 


11 23 


11 56 


27 


54 


11 12 


1151 


5 


30 


1 


23 


58 


125 


time of High Water <U London 


=; 


— 


25 


1 17 


1 38 


— 


23 


49 


1 6 


43 


1 5 


1 60 


2 14 


Bridge. 


6 


51 


113 


1 57 


2 16 


49 


110 


126 


1 44 


1 27 


147 


2 40 


3 5 


Aberystwith ... add 5 3af i , 
Bantry ... „ 1 4l ' , 
Barnstaple ... „ 4 3{»J;i 
Berwick ... ,, 20¥ " 'i 


7 


135 


1 54 


2 34 


2 49 


129 


1 48 


2 3 


2 20 


2 8 


2 30 


3 31; 3 56 


8 


2 14 


2 I.. 


8 3 


3 19 


2 4 


2 20 


2 36 


2 55 


2 53 


3 16 


4 23 


4 47 


. 9 


2 48 


3 3 


3 36 


3 51 


2 36 


2 52 


3 15 


3 34 


3 39 


4 3 


5 14 


5 39 


10 


3 22 


3 39 


4 7 


4 26 


3 8 


3 24 


3 54 


4 15 


4 29 


4 55 


6 7 


6 33 


Bristol , 5 15 V, 


II 


3 57 


4 14 


4 42 


4 59 


3 41 


3 59 


4 38 


4 59 


5 19 


5 47 


6 58 


7 26 


Cardiff ^'468 


12 


4 31 


4 48 


5 17 


5 34 


4 16 


4 35 


5 22 


5 49 


6 16 


6 46 


7 54 


8 22 


Cardigan .... 5 3 


13 


5 5 


5 22 


5 52 


6 15 


4 53 


5 14 


6 16 


6 47 


7 19 


7 61 


8 54 


9 27 


Dartmouth ... ,^ 4 18 


'4 


5 40 


6 1 


6 38 


7 3 


5 33 


5 55 


7 21 


8 1 


8 26 


9 6 


9 68 10 31 


Devonport ... „ 3 45 


15 


6 22 


6 44 


7 32 


8 7 


6 21 


6 48 


8 44 


9 28 


9 40 


10 11 


11 3,11 32 


Dundee ... „ 34 


16 


7 6 


7 32 


8 47 


9 36 


7 20 


7 59 


10 10 


10 48 


10 44 


1116 





2 


Falmouth ... „ 2 59 


17 


8 1 


8 34 


10 26 


1113 


8 43 


9 33 


11 24 


11 54 


11 44 




29 


53 


Hull 1, 4 31 i 


18 


9 12 


9 55 


11 57 


— 


10 22 


11 7 


— 


20 


10 


34 


1 16 


1 37 


Leith 1, 19 


19 


10 38 


11 20 


34 


I 4 


11 48 


__ 


42 


1 3 


54 


1 17 


1 57 


2 17 


Newcastle ... „ 1 34 ; 


20 


— 


2 


1 29 


1 54 


21 


47 


124 


145 


137 


1 57 


2 35' 2 52 


Penzance ... „ 2 32 


21 


36 


1 7 


2 15 


2 34 


1 11 


133 


2 3 


2 20 


2 15 


2 32 


3 10 3 27 


Portland ... „ 5 3 


22 


1 36 


2 3 


2 55 


3 13 


1 53 


213 


2 37 


2 55 


2 50 


3 8 


3 45 


4 2 


Qneenstown ... „ 3 2 


23 


2 26 


2 49 


3 31 


3 49 


2 29 


2 48 


3 10 


3 27 


3 24 


3 43 


4 20 


4 37 


Scarborough ...,,2 13 


24 


3 12 


3 35 


4 8 


4 24 


3 4 


3 20 


3 46 


4 2 


4 


4 18 


4 54 


5 12 


Kuuderland ... ,, 1 24 


25 


3 54 


4 16 


4 41 


4 57 


3 37 


3 65 


4 18 


4S4 


4 34 


4 53 


5 30 


5 50 


Swansea ... ,,4 2 


26 


4H5 


4 56 


5 12 


5 27 


4 11 


4 27 


4 53 


5 10 


5 10 


5 30 


6 10 


6 31 


Torbay ... „ 4 2 


27 


5 14 


5 30 


5 44 


6 3 


4 42 


4 58 


6 28 


5 49 


5 51 


6 15 


6 54 


7 19 


Watertord ... „ 4 8 


28 


5 47 


6 5 


6 22 


6 43 


5 13 


6 31 


6 12 


6 37 


6 38 


7 4 


7 46 


8 13 


Whitby ... „ 1 47 


29 


6 25 


6 44 


- - 


- - 


5 51 


6 11 


7 4 


7 36 


7 31 


8 1 


8 43 


9 16 




30 


7 6 


7 29 


- - 


- - 


6 34 


7 2 


8 11 


8 48 


8 31 


9 5 


9 51 10 26 


Aberdeen ... sub. 58 


3T 


7 55 


8 26 




- - 


7 35 


8 111 - - 


— 


9 37 


10 8 


- - 1 - - 


Banff „ 1 30 

Belfast „ 3 15 








11 


July. 


August. 


September 


October. 


November. 


December. 


Brighton ... „ 2 43 
Carnarvon ... „ 4 31 

Cowes „ 3 43 

Douglas ... „ 2 46 


CS 


Muru Aft 
h.m. li. ui. 


Morn 


Aft 


Morn ; Aft 
h. m. h. m. 


Morn 


Aft 


Morn 


Aft 


Moru| Aft 




li. m. 


h.m. 


h. w. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m 


li. ni. 


I 


11 2 11 37 


6 35 


1 4 


2 6 2 26 


2 22 


2 40 


3 11 


3 29 


3 31 


3 49 


Dover „ 2 46 


2 


— 


10 


1 33 


1 59 


2 46, 3 6 


2 59 


3 IS 


3 47 


4 3 


4 7 


4 24 


Dublin „ 2 46 yS 


3 


41 


1 8 


2 23 


2 47 


3 27 3 45 


3 35 


3 53 


4 20 


4 39 


4 41 


5 


Folkestone ... „ 2 51 C'* 


4 


1 38 


2 5 


3 8 


3 32 


4 4! 4 23 


4 12 


4 27 


4 57 


5 15 


5 17 




Gravesend ... „ 53 14 




2 31 


2 58 


3 52 


4 14 


4 41 4 58 


4 45 


5 2 


5 37 


5 59 


5 58 


6 20 


Greenock ... „ 1 oOi^ 


6 


3 23 


3 47 


4 34 


4 53 


5 15 5 32 


5 19 


5 40 


6 24 


6 52 


6 43 


7 9 


Holyhead ... „ 3 47 111 


7 


4 11 


4 37 


5 12 


6 31 


5 52 6 13 


H 2 


6 26 


7 22 


7 55 


7 34 


8 3 


Kingstown ... „ 2 47 ^' 


8 


5 


5 23 


5 51 


6 12 


6 36 7 


6 54 


7 26 


8 30 


9 9 


S 34 


9 9 


Liverpool ... „ 2 35 


9 


5 45 


6 6 


6 31 


6 52 


7 30 8 4 


8 4 


8 46 


9 4(i 


10 20 


9 43 10 14 


Margate ... „ 2 13 


10 


6 28 


6 51 


7 16 


7 42 


8 46| 9 34 


9 33 


10 15 


10 51 


11 18 


10 45 1116 


Peterhead ... „ 1 24 


II 


7 14 


7 38 


8 13 


8 49 


10 2011 1 


10 51 


1121 


11 45 





11 46 





Portsmouth ... „ 2 17 


12 


8 4 


8 32 


9 30 


10 15 


11 37 


— 


11 49 




7 


28 


13 


38 


Ramsgate ... „ 2 14 


13 


9 4 


9 40 


10 57 


il 36 


8 


31 


13 


33 


48 


1 10 


1 4 


130 


Southampton... „ 3 28 


14 


10 18 


10 56 


— 


Oil 


52 


1 10 


51 


1 9 


130 


1 50 


1 55 


2 17 


Spithead ... „ 2 38 


IS 


11 31 


— 


39 


1 2 


129 


1 46 


1 26 


145 


2 11 


2 32 


2 43 


3 8 


Yarmouth ... „ 4 43 ^ 


16 

17 


4 
57 


34 

1 19 


121 
2 


141 

2 15 


2 2 
2 31 


2 16 

2 48 


2 1 

2 34 


2 18 
2 53 


2 54 

3 40 


3 17 

4 4 


3 33 

4 23 


3 57 

4 47 


Should the "tide interval" 
to be subtracted be greater 


18 


1 41 


2 2 


2 no 


2 46 


3 2 


3 20 


3 12 


3 31 


4 27 


4 53 


5 12 


5 37 


than the quantity from which 


19 


2 19 


2 36 


3 1 


3 17 


3 37 


3 54 


3 50 


4 13 


5 17 


5 44 


6 3 


6 28 


it has to be talced, add 12 hours 


20 
21 


2 54 

3 20 


3 11 
3 42 


3 32 

4 6 


3 49 

4 22 


4 12 

4 49 


4 31 

5 9 


4 34 

5 20 


4 57 

5 46 


612 
7 14 


6 44 

7 4S 


6 53 

7 47 


7 20 

8 17 


to the London Bridge time: 
the resulting difference ivill be 
the, jireeediiig day^s afternoon 


22 


3 58 


4 16 


4 38 


4 54 


5 29 


5 54 


6 16 


6 48 


8 23 


9 


8 48 


9 23 


iitlr. iriirii til,'. London morn- 


23 


4 33 


4 50 


5 12 


5 30 


6 22 


6 62 


7 24 


8 5 


9 30 


10 12 


9 58 


10 34 


ii,' l„lr ini.i n.-ied. 


24 


5 0] 5 23 


5 50 


6 12 


7 25 


8 8 


8 47 


9 33 10 45 


LI 15 


11 7 


11 40 


It in III liiipiieii that the sum 
'" Uitlli Water at London 
Brid//e," plus" tide intcrrnl" i 


25 


5 41 


6 


6 37 


7 6 


8 54 


9 44 


10 12 


10 48 


11 44 






10 


2'S 


6 20 


6 42 


7 37 


8 13 


10 30 


11 1-0 


11 20 


11 50 


11 


35 


37 


1 2 


iviUex'reed 12 lionrs: in that 


27 


7 7 


7 33 


8 56 


9 45 


1145 








15 


57 


1 21 


1 25 


1 47 


case this excess n-iil reiniseiit 


2^ 


S 3 


8 35 


10 33 


11 17 


15 


39 


3S 


59 


1 4i 


2 


2 8 


2 25 


the time of hiijh. lealer .ijter 
the vo'iii .ir-ni'dir'i'if foihin^- 
iii 1. it,-i;ii;l,ii 1 's Hi ■ I/i./h 


59 


9 13 


9 57 


11 57 


— 


1 2 


125 


121 


1 40 


2 19 


2 30 


2 43 




30 


)0-i(J 


1123 


28 


54 


145 


2 5 


2 


2 18 


2 55 


3 12 


3 IS 


3 35 


Water at Loudon leas cUher 


\ ^^ 




1 


1 20 


1 44 




- - 


2 00 


252 - - 




S 52 4 8 1 


morning or evening. 


* 












^— — 


















— . ■ 1 








LIVE STOCK 


PRODUCE TABLE. 








J.J 


J/«r^. 


Cow. 


E^ve. 


Sow. 


Feb. 


Mare. 


1 

Cow. 


Ewe. 


5'l37£;. 


Mar. 


Mare. 


Cow. 


Ewe. ' 

_l 


Sow. 


J 


Dec I 


Oct.io 


My. 29 


Ap. 21 


I 


Tan. I 


No. 10 


Jan. 29 


My. 2 2 


I 


Jan. 29 


1 1 
Dec. 8 Jul. 27 


jnn.19 


2 


2 


II 


3-' 




2 


2 


11 


30 


23 


2 


30 


9 


28 


20 


3 


3 


12 


31 


23 


3 


3 


12 


July I 


24 


3 


^3/ 


10 


29 


21 


4 


4 


13 


June 1 


24 


4 


4 


13 


2 


25 


4 


Feb. I 


ir 


30 


22 


5 


5 


14 


2 


25 


S 




14 


3 


26 


5 


2 


12 


, 3^ 


23 


t 6 


6 


15 


3 


20 


6 


6 


15 


4 


27 


6 


3 


13 


Aug. I 


24 


^ 7 


7 


16 


4 


27 


7 


7 


16 


5 


28 


7 


4 


14 


2 


25 


V 3 


8 


17 


5 


28 


8 


8 


17 


6 


29 


8 


5 


15 


3 


26 


1 5 


9 


18 


6 


29 


9 


9 


18 


7 


30 


9 


6 


16 


4 


S 


1^^ 


10 


19 


7 


•;o 


10 


10 


19 


8 


31 


ID 


7 


17 


S 


#" 


II 


20 


8 


May I 


II 


II 


20 


9 


June I 


11 


8 


18 


6 


29 


ir 12 


12 


21 


9 


2 


12 


12 


■21 


10 


2 


12 


9 


19 


7 


30 


13 


13 


22 


10 


3 


13 


IS 


22 


II 


3 


13 


ID 


20 


8 


Juiy 1 


H 


14 


23 


II 


4 


14 


14 


23 


12 


4 


14 


11 


21 


9 


2 


IS 


15 


24 


12 


5 


15 


15 


24 


13 


s 


15 


12 


22 


10 


3 


n 


16 


25 


13 


6 


16 


i6 


25 


14 


6 


16 


13 


23 


II 


4 


17 


17 


26 


14 


7 


17 


17 


26 


15 


7 


17 


14 


24 


12 


5 


18 


18 


27 


15 


8 


18 


18 


27 


16 


8 


18 


15 


^5 


13 


6 


19 


19 


28 


16 


9 


19 


19 


28 


17 


9 


19 


16 


26 


14 


7 


20 


20 


29 


17 


10 


20 


20 


29 


18 


ID 


20 


'7 


27 


IS 


8 


21 


21 


SC- 


18 


II 


21 


21 


^3° 


19 


H 


21 


18 


28 


16 


9 


22 


22 


SI 


19 


12 


22 


22 


Dec. I 


20 


12 


22 


19 


29 


17 


10 


•23 


23 


Nov. I 


20 


13 


23 


23 


2 


21 


13 


23 


20 


30 


18 


II 


24 


24 


2 


21 


14 


24 


24 


3 


22 


14 


24 


21 


T^' 


19 


12 


25 


25 


3 


22 


15 


25 


2S 


4 


23 


15 


25 


22 


Jan. I 


20 


13 


20 


26 


4 


23 


16 


26 


26 


5 


24 


16 


26 


23 


2 


21 


14 


27 


27 


5 


24 


17 


27 


27 


6 


25 


17 


27 


24 


3 


22 


IS 


28 


23 


6 


25 


18 


28 


28 


7 


26 


18 


28 


25 


4 


23 


16 


29 


29 


7 


26 


19 


29 










29 


26 


5 


24 


17 


30 


30 


8 


27 


20 












SO 


27 


6 


25 


18 


31 


31 


9 




21 












31 


28 


7 


26 


19 


Apr. 


Mare. 


Co%v. 


^K'^. 


Sow. 


May. 


3^ are. 


Cow. 


.Sw^. ^ tSiiw. 


June 


^/«r^. 


C02U. 


Ezve. 


Sow. 


/"i 


Mar. I 


Jan. 8 


Au. 27 


Jul. 20 


I 


Ma. 31 


Feb. 7 


Sep.26 Au. 19 


I 


May I 


Ma. 10 


Oct.27 


Sep.19 


2 


2 


9 


28 


21 


2 


7\pr. I 


8 


27 


20 


2 


2 


II 


28 


20 


? 


3 


10 


29 


22 


3 


2 


9 


28 


21 


3 


3 


12 


29 


21 




4 


II 


30 


23 


4 


3 


ID 


29 


22 


4 


4 


13 


so 


22 




5 


12 


3t 


24 


5 


4 


II 


30 


23 


5 


5 


14 


.r3' 


23 




6 


13 


Sept. I 


25 


6 


S 


12 


Oct. I 


24 


6 


6 


15 


Nov. I 


24 




7 


14 


2 


26 


7 


6 


'3 


2 


25 


7 


7 


16 


2 


25 




8 


15 


3 


27 


8 


7 


14 


3 


26 


8 


8 


17 


3 


26 




9 


16 


4 


28 


9 


8 


15 


4 


27 


9 


9 


18 


4 


27 


10 


10 


17 


5 


29 


10 


9 


16 




28 


10 


10 


19 


5 


28 


II 


n 


18 


6 


30 


II 


10 


17 


6 


29 


II 


II 


20 


6 


29 


12 


12 


19 


7 


31 


12 


II 


iB 


7 


30 


12 


12 


21 


7 


30 


i^; 


13 


20 


8 


Aug. I 


13 


12 


19 


8 


^ 31 


•3 


IS 


22 


8 


Oct. I 


A 


14 


21 


9 


2 


14 


13 


20 


9 


Sep. I 


14 


14 


23 


9 


2 


IS 


15 


22 


10 


3 


15 


14 


21 


10 


2 


15 


15 


24 


ID 


3 


16 


16 


23 


II 


4 


16 


IS 


22 


II 


3 


16 


16 


25 


II 


4 


17 


17 


24 


12 


5 


17 


16 


23 


12 


4 


17 


17 


26 


12 


5 


18 


18 


25 


13 


6 


18 


•7 


24 


13 


5 


18 


18 


27 


13 


6 


19 


19 


26 


14 


7 


19 


18 


25 


14 


6 


19 


19 


28 


14 


7 


20 


20 


27 


15 


8 


20 


19 


26 


15 


7 


■JO 


20 


29 


15 


8 


21 


21 


28 


16 


9 


21 


20 


27 


36 


8 


21 


21 


30 


16 


9 


22 


22 


29 


17 


10 


22 


21 


28 


'7 


9 


22 


22 


31 


17 


10 


23 


23 


30 


18 


II 


23 


22 


Mar. I 




10 


23 


23 


Apr. I 


18 


11 


24 


24 


^31 


19 


12 


24 


23 


2 


19 


II 


24 


24 


2 


19 


12 


25 


25 


Feb. T 


20 


13 


25 


24 


3 


20 


12 


25 


25 


3 


20 


13 


26 


26 


2 


21 


14 


26 


25 


4 


21 


13 


20 


26 


4 


21 


14 


27 


27 


3 


22 


IS 


27 


26 




22 


14 


27 


27 


5 


22 


15 


fzB 


28 


4 


23 


16 


28 


27 


6 


23 


15 


28 


28 


6 


23 


16 


29 


29 


5 


24 


17 


29 


28 


7 


24 


16 


29 


29 


7 


24 


'7 


30 


30 


6 


25 


18 


30 
31 


29 

30 


8 

9 


25 
26 


17 

18 


30 


30 

1 


8 


25 


18 





ADVERTISEMENTS 



THE ''DALKEITH" 

CROSS^K E YS 
HOTEL, 

Refurnished and Restocked with 

specially selected Wines and Spirits 

DINNERS, TEAS and SUPPERS supplied on the 
Shortest Notice. 

JOHN BRODIE, Purveyor, Ediatargli & Dalkeitli. 

Wedding and Excursion Parties Contracted for 
Room for Dining 150 People. 

Everything at Popular Prices. 



'BUS ^^^^^,^^^ DALKEITH & 

SERVICE ^ET^^^EN p^osEWELL. 

A 'Bus is run between Cross Keys, Dalkeith 
aitd Ro sew ell, as tinder: — 
Leave Cross Keys, Dalkeith: 9, 10, n, 12, 2, 3, 5 and 6. 
Leave Rosewell : 10, n, 12, i, 3, 4, 6, and 7. 

Fares — Dalkeith to Eskbank or Bonnyrigg, 2d; Bonnyrigg to 
Rosewell, 2d; Dalkeith to Rosewell, 4d. 

Posting in all its Branches. John Brodie, Proprietor. 



Also at 52 LOTHIAN ST., EDINBURGH- 

Dinner — Three Courses — One Shilling. 



TO TELL THE WEIGHT OF CATTLE. fc 

By means of the following table we may with considerable accuracy estimate the weight of 

cattle without the trouble of putting them upon the steelyard. It is to be observed, however^ 
that in very fat cattle the Jour quarters will be about one-twent'eth -more, while in those in a very 
lean state they will be one-twe»ti> th less than the wcghts s/ioivn. 



Girth. 


Length. 


Weight. 


Girth. 


Length. 


Weight. 


Girth, length. 


Weight. 


Girth. 


Length. 


Weight. 


ft. in. 


fi. in. 


J^. 


lbs. 


ft. in. 


//. in. 


42". 


lbs. 


'y?. in. ft. in. 


St. 


lbs. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


St. lbs. 


4 3 


3 o 


12 


12 


5 3 


5 


32 


11 


6 6 


4 6 


45 


3 


7 6 


5 3 


7^ 4 




3 3 


13 


13 


5 6 


3 6 


25 


2 




4 9 


47 


10 




5 6 


73 9 




3 6 


15 







3 9 


27 







5 


50 


4 




5 9 


77 




3 9 


i6 


I 




4 


28 


II 




5 3 


52 


11 




6 


80 5 




4 o 


17 


2 




4 3 


30 


8 




5 6 


55 


4 




6 3 


83 9 


4 6 


3 o 


14 


6 




4 6 


32 


5 




1 5 


57 


II 




6 6 


87 




3 3 


IS 


9 




4 9 


34 


2 




6 


60 


4 




6 9 


90 5 




3 6 


i6 


12 




5 


36 







6 3 


63 





7 9 


5 


71 7 




3 9 


i8 


I 




5 3 


37 


11 


6 9 


4 6 


48 


II 




5 3 


75 ' 




4 o 


19 


4 


5 9 


5 


29 


7 




4 9 


51 


7 




5 6 


78 9 




4 3 


20 


6 




4 


3^ 


6 




5 


54 


3 




5 9 


^2 ^ 


4 9 


3 3 


17 


6 




4 3 


-s: 


6 




5 3 


56 


13 




6 


P5 1. 




3 6 


18 


II 




4 6 


3: 


=; 




5 6 


59 


9 




6 3 


89 5 




3 9 


20 


2 




4 9 


37 


5 




5 9 


62 


6 




6 6 


92 13 




4 o 


21 


6 




5 


39 


5 




6 


^5 


I 




6 9 


90 7 




4 3 


22 


II 




5 3 


41 


4 


I 


6 3 


67 


11 




7 


100 




4 6 


24 


2 




5 6 


43 


4 


r 


4 


55 


6 


8 


5 3 


80 




4 9 


25 


7 


6 


4 3 


36 


6 




5 


58 


4 




5 6 


83 II 


5 o 


3 3 


19 


5 




4 6 


38 


8 




5 3 


61 


3 




5 9 


^7 8 




3 6 


20 


12 




4 9 


40 


10 




5 6 


64 


2 




6 


91 6 




3 9 


22 


7 




5 


42 


12 




5 9 


67 


I 




6 3 


95 3 




4 o 


23 


12 




5 1 


45 


c 




6 


69 


13 




6 6 


99 




4 3 


25 


5 




S 6 


A'' 


2 




6 3 


72 


12 




6 9 


TC2 rz 




4 6 


26 


13 




5 9 


49 


4 




6 6 


75 


II 




7 


106 g 




4 9 


28 


6 




6 


5T 


8 


7 3 


4 9 


59 


6 


8 3 


5 6 


89 I 




5 o 


30 





6 3 


4 6 


41 


II 




£ 


62 


8 




5 9 


93 2 


5 3 


3 3 


21 


4 




4 9 


44 


2 




5 3 


6 = 


9 




6 


97 3 




3 6 


22 


13 




5 


46 


7 




5 6 


6.'J 






6 3 


lOf 3 




3 9 


24 


8 




5 3 


48 


II 




5 9 


7f 


13 




6 6 


»05 4 




4 o 


26 


3 




5 6 


SI 


2 




6 


75 


I 




6 9 


19 5 




4 3 


27 


12 




5 9 


53 


6 




6 3 


78 


3 




7 


113 6 




4 6 


29 


7 




6 


55 


II 




6 6 


8t 


4 




7 3 


117 6 




4 9 


31 


2 




6 3 


58 


2 


7 6 


5 


06 


13 









HAY AND STRAW.. 

'r.'ss of Straw, 36 lb. 
. . ass of Old Hay 56 lb. 
Truss of New Hay (to September ist), 60 lb. 
Load, 36 Trusses = Straw, 11 cwt. 2 qrs. 8 lb. 
Old Hay, 18 cwt. ; New Hay, 19 cwt. 1 qr. 4 il> 

SEEDS NEEDED TO SOW AN IMPERI IL AC E 

Barley 2\ to 2\ bus 

Beans 2 /<? 2^ bus 

Cabbage, Drumhead, to transpl 

Carrot in drills . 

Clover 

Kohl Rabi . 

Ditto, drilled 

Ditto, for seed . 

Lucerne, broadcast . 

Mustard, white . . 

Mangold Wurtzel 

Oats .... 

Parsnip . . , 

Rape or Cole . , 



R,e 
Rye Grass . 
Sainfoin, Giant 
Tares, Winter 
Ditto, Spring 
Turnip ^ . 
Wheat ^ . 



ant 



4 /f'S 

8 to I J /, -V. 
4 to 17 Ib'c. 



4 lbs 
\\ bit-. 

20 lbs. 

5 lbs. 
%to 4 bu.'i. 

10 lbs. 
I pk. 
2I ro 3 biK. 
2 J 10 3 b'ts. 

'^b.S. 

■2\ ba.. 
2 to 2I bi' 
_j .c/S. 

li to 3\ bus. 



r-mnds 

Cloves 
Stones 

To 18 . 

Sacks . 



WOtL 

=• I Clove 

-•■ I Stone 
- I Tod 



W 



ey , 



I Last 
The Pack weighs ?4o lb. 

SE Hi NEED D 10 SlW CA^JEN PLOTS. 

Aspar gtis bed o' 15 squ.-^re yarus . I /'• 

l-!eaii-, boau, per row of 80 «(«-i( . . 'I qt. 

Beet, row of 50 ues. 

BruCCd i, per ■• ■---'"are 



Bniss Is 'pr— '- '—■ - * square -, 
C'libage ^"-^ ■^' «. suiiare y.'irds 
Carr'itv, •- -■■ ■-« .-^j rt-ei 
' auliflc'^'— - -< -Miuare yards 
Celery. - — -.-ic y .ids 
Kidne- --"-"is. row 80 eet . 
l-eltU' ■•• -1 n»iU£i;e yards 
Oiiioir - — -xsAW ire yards 
P.Trs!-— ^Mw 80 feet . 
P;i'-- ■ ^. (trill of 200 feet . 
K- ..,.. -ow .)f 60 teet . 

- i^Wjes, row of 8u .eet 
«.""ii-,lies, 4 squ.ire yards , 

:^'UiO\ , \ scitian- yards . 

Sji'mti-h, drill of 120 feet , 
I'uniip, 6 yards square 



rds, 



I pt. 
\pk. 



k .. 



ADVERTI-EiMliNTS 



iH4111S S, HOWS # iili, 

Family Grocers, Tea Dealers, Wine aad Spirit Meicliatits, 

1 ESKDAILL ST., DALKEITH, 

and 

17 .eiioh: sti^:eet, HiOA-isrHiEj^r) 

(Established 1817) 
They, having registered the names of "Glenesk" and "GLENKi^ivocK" as 
applying to their Teas and Whiskies, would call the attention of the Public 
to the Large Stock of these Goods, which are justly famed for their Quality and 
Cheapness. Having made these Branches of the Trade, along with Wines, 
their special study, they are able to offer the Tublic the Genuine Article at the 
Lowest Possible Price. 

ALL KINDS OF GROCERY GOODS AT LOWEST PRICES. 

Sole Agents for Kinloch's Catalan Wines. 

Agents for Raggett's Nourishing Stouts and Golden Hop Ales. 

Sole AoKNTsfor Equitable Fire and Accident Insurance. 

Shitping Agents — Passengers Booked to all parts at Lowest Rates. 

1 Eskdaill Street, Dalkeith : 17 High Strett, Loanhed 
Dalkeith. Root Repairing Shop. 



JOHN M'lVOR, 

Edinburgh Road. 

China and Glass Merchant, 
64 High Street, Dalkeith. 



SuOTTISH i^FiOVIBENT 
IliSTITDTIOfi. 

Head Office— 6 ST. ANDREW SQUARE, EDINBURGH. 

Mutual Assurance- Moderate Premiums. 

THE PREMIUMS are so moderate that an Assurance o 
£i 200 or £1250 may generally be secured from the first for tr 
same yearly payment which usually would be charged (wi. 
p>-ofits) for £1000 only — equivalent to an immediate and certa' 
P' lus of 20 to 25 per cent. 

fHE WHOLE SURPLUS goes to the Policyholders on a 
. >tem at once safe and equitable — no share being given to those 
by whose early death there is a loss to the Common Fund. 



EXAMPLES OF PREMIUMS FOR ^I 


DO AT DEATH (wiTH PROFITS 


) 


1 Age. 


25 30a 


35 


40 


45 


50 


55 


During Life. 
26 Payments. 
! 15 Payments. 


;C1 18 ^2 1 6 

2 10 2 2 13 

3 8 5 3 12 1 


£2 6 10 

2 17 9 

3 18 


;62 14 9 

3 4 6 

4 5 8 


;^3 5 9 

3 14 

4 16 2 


£4 1 7 

4 8 7 

5 11 8 


£5 111 

5 6 11 

6 9 11 



r *» — >-ncr>n of 30 may secure ;^1000 at death by a yearly payment, during life, of ;^20 15s., 
if. nost Offices secure (with profits) ^800 only. Or he may secure ;41000 by 25 

p,. :vi 10s., being thus free of payments before age 55 

\PLUS at last Investigation, (1894) amounted to ^1,423,000. 

More than one half of the members who died during the last 
Septennial period were entitled to Bonuses which, nOtwithstand- 
inj that the Premiums do not as a rule exceed the 
non-profit rates of other Offices were on the average equal 
to an Addition of about 50 per cent, to the policies which 
participated. 

ACCUMULATED FUNDS, '£10,500,000. 

Reports, with full information, may be had on application to the 
AGENT AT DALKEITH— 

ABRAM DOUGLAS, Corn Merchant, Dalkeith Mills. 




THE 



LANCASHIRE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

(Fire and Life) 



HEAD OFFICE— 

'V" The LaucasMre Insurance Buildings,Manchester. 
CAPITAL — THREE MILLIONS. 

OfFICFS TN ^COTLAND — * 

133 WEST GEORGE STREET, GLASGOW. 

12 YORK BUILDINGS, QUEEN STREET, EDINBURGH. 

QUEENSGATE, INVERNESS. 

SCOTTISH BOARD. 

Chairman— ^iv DONALD MATHESON, K.C.B. 



HUGH BROWN, Esq., Glasgow. 
D". S. CARGILL, Ksq., Glasgow and Ceylon. 
SirC. DALRYMPLE, of Newhailes, Bt, M.P. 
JOHN CHARLES DUNLOP, Esq,J.P.Edin. 
WALTER DUNCAN, Esq., Glasgow. 
ALEX. ERASER, Esq., Inverness. 
JAMES KEYDEN, Esq., Glasgow 
Sir GEORGE MACPHERSON-GRANT. 
Bart., of Ballindalloch (London Board.) 



W. H. EZIDSTON, Esq., Glasgow. 
Sir JAMES KING, of Campsie, Bart., LL.D. 
ANDREW MACKENZIE, Esq, of Dalmore 
Sir KENNETH J. MATHESON, of Loch- 

alsh, Bart. 
ALEX. ROSS, Esq., LL.D., Inverness. 
Sir JAMES A. RUSSELL, LL.D, Edinburgh 
ALEXANDER SCOTT, Esq., J.P., Dundee. 



Indisputable World-wide Policies. No Restrictions. 
Moderate Ra.tes. Interim Bonuses. 

Two Indeoendent Valuations of Life Liabilities. Payment of Claims 

on proof of Death and Title. Quotations of Life Eatos to meet Special 

Contingencies. Immediate provision for payment of De ).th Duties. 

Insurances are granted at Home and Abroad at equitable rates. 
Losses promptly and liberally settled. Surveys made Free of Charge. 

®MFI.©TE;mS» I.I^.BILITT DEFiiRTMBIITs' 

Insurances effected ?.gainst Employers' Liability under 

The Workmen's Compensation Act, 1897. 

The Employers' Liability Act. 

And at Co.mmon Law. 

Every Kisk is specially rated on its merits. 

Prospectuses and every information may be had at the 

East of Scotland Branch Office: 

12 York Buildings, Queen Street, Edinburgh. 

G. SM EATON GOOLD, Resident Secretary. 

AGENTS AT DALKEITH. 

Mr JOHN GARMENT, Bookseller. | Mr E. DAWSON, Croft Street. 

Mr JOHN CRAIG, Clydesdale Bank, 

Applicvtions for Agencies and for Quotations- of Rates invited.^